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This is why US troops didn't use drum magazines.......


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#1 rpbcps

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 12:03 PM

Don't you love it when articles give incorrect information to their readers:

 

"Switching between a drum magazine and a box magazine required an extra set of tools. To load a drum magazine also required the user to have a special tool that would lock the bolt back to the rear. And, unlike spring-loaded box mags that were already under tension, reloading a drum magazine required a tool to rotate the spring in the magazine enough to put the rounds under the necessary tension.

 

Worst of all, if you lost any of the tools needed to reload the weapon, you would be hard-pressed to actually be able to do it without assistance".

 

https://www.wearethe...=2#rebelltitem2

 

Stay safe

 

Richard


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#2 Waffen Und Bier

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 12:43 PM

The drum windie thingie bit.
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#3 Paladin601

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 12:58 PM

Don't you love it when articles give incorrect information to their readers:

 

"Switching between a drum magazine and a box magazine required an extra set of tools. To load a drum magazine also required the user to have a special tool that would lock the bolt back to the rear. And, unlike spring-loaded box mags that were already under tension, reloading a drum magazine required a tool to rotate the spring in the magazine enough to put the rounds under the necessary tension.

 

Worst of all, if you lost any of the tools needed to reload the weapon, you would be hard-pressed to actually be able to do it without assistance".

 

https://www.wearethe...=2#rebelltitem2

 

Stay safe

 

Richard

so NOW you are attacking the media?         

 

(Sarcasm, where have I heard it before)


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#4 jim c 351

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 01:41 PM

Richard,

If they were writing about the Kahr semi auto Thompson the would be close to accurate.

Numrich sold a tool to aid in removing and inserting the drum.

The tool used for winding the drum is called the winding key and one comes with each drum.

I would guess that the author never got within a mile of a real Thompson, but may have shot a make believe Thompson.

Jim C

PS many Thompson gunners didn't like the drum for other reasons, especially the British, who returned a boat load for credit. 


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#5 rpbcps

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 02:38 PM

I thought that same, re: winding key, but as it comes with each drum?

 

The post war Kahr tool may be what the ill informed author is writing in about then?

 

Stay safe

 

Richard

PS I never attack, just question the media, quite often here in the UK!


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#6 Merry Ploughboy

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 02:45 PM

FWIW, back when Vector modified WWII era Suomi M31, 71 round drum magazines for use in the Uzi submachine gun, they came up with a drum winder based on a 2 1/2" PVC pipe cap.  The winder, of course, also works for non-modified Suomi drums.  Based on photos, I've made a few of the winders to take along with Vector drums and unmodified Suomi drums.  The winders keep ones fingers from getting dirty and also from getting whacked if ones grip slips and the rotor snaps back during winding.  So for some WWII vintage drum mags (e.g., those that don't have an external winding key), a drum winder is a nice, but not necessary tool.  Maybe that's what the author had in mind.

And those Suomi 50 round, quad-stack stick mags are impossible to load without a loader tool.


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#7 laurencen

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 03:47 PM

I can see why a 30xx stick was easier, they can carry 5 of them easily in a pouch and loads quite easily, to carry three drums would be tedious and having loaded a drum its way slower than a 30xx mag.

 

recall many years ago my uncle had a Thompson when he was in the Royal Navy, he said many drums went over the side, they rattled lots in the fields and easily gave positions away, he carried the 30xx mags, he had the Thompson on his wardrobe until he passed away, have no idea what happened to his bag but several war trophies were in it, 


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#8 MG08

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 05:48 PM

I seem to remember reading somewhere that the Early WWII GIs particularly in the Pacific and Brit commandos would use the drum to start an operation / attck, and then when empty drop it and use stick mags.  there sees to be pics of Marines using the drum in combat.


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#9 Oldtrooper

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 07:29 PM

I seem to remember reading somewhere that the Early WWII GIs particularly in the Pacific and Brit commandos would use the drum to start an operation / attck, and then when empty drop it and use stick mags.  there sees to be pics of Marines using the drum in combat.

Marine tank men with 50 round drum.

 

Attached File  Stuart Light Tank.jpg   171.14K   41 downloads


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#10 jim c 351

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 07:31 PM

Jeeps and tanks are a great way to transport drums.

Jim C


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#11 StrangeRanger

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 08:18 PM

...or anything else.


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#12 john

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 09:08 PM

That article has been thoroughly "Kahr-ed"!
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#13 anjong-ni

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 11:46 AM

The worst heresy: I think that until 1955, all Packard 8-cylinder automotive engines were "inline- (straight-) 8's"....Phil

 

 

 

 In gangland Chicago, all you needed was time for your V8 Packard to speed away before the Untouchables swooped in.


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#14 john

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 06:54 PM

It all sounds like a dime novel!
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#15 2ndArmored

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 07:02 PM

abc

Attached Files


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#16 Merry Ploughboy

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Posted 02 August 2020 - 10:14 AM

Also, in the semi-documentary movie "Wind Talkers", the American soldier played by Nicolas Cage did, in fact, use a Thompson with a drum magazine.  And, IIRC, he fired hundreds upon hundreds of rounds without replacing, reloading, or winding the drum.


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#17 jim c 351

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Posted 02 August 2020 - 04:21 PM

MP,

Old Nick was obviously using a post office Colt 21 in the opening scene and "if I remember correctly a "C" drum."

I actually thought that was quite clever of the writers.

Jim C 


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#18 john

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Posted 02 August 2020 - 08:54 PM

Not only that, he carried a bunch of thirty round mags in 20 round pouches and never lost a single one, nor did his pants fall down or belt fall off!
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#19 rpbcps

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Posted Yesterday, 11:56 AM

Not only that, he carried a bunch of thirty round mags in 20 round pouches and never lost a single one, nor did his pants fall down or belt fall off!

 

John,

attached is a photo of a US soldier using a five cell XX pouch to carry his 30 rnd mags, taking some wherein Europe, I am guessing.

 

Attached File  5 cell 30 rnd.jpg   138.64K   30 downloads

 

Stay safe

Richard


Edited by rpbcps, Yesterday, 11:57 AM.

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#20 jim c 351

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Posted Yesterday, 01:03 PM

Richard,

30 rd mags in a 5/20 mag pouch is the cats ass. Very fast and sure on the draw.

If worried about mags falling out, just bring the flaps around the side of mag and snap.

Competitive shooters do the same thing now, myself included.

Jim C


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