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M3 Finish Issues


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#21 johnsonlmg41

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Posted 13 February 2016 - 09:04 PM

Actually I've done just that with a M3 specifically.    What I've found is newer guys follow the instructions to a tee since they don't know any better.  I oversee any prep work and do most of that myself since gunsmiths know little if anything about chemistry and lots can go wrong.  Of course I always look at what came out of the tank last to make sure they have some clue and all is well with the setup so no I don't just drop stuff off on the porch with a sticky note on it, there is some diligence involved with everything I do.  I'm not the total idiot I may appear to be?

 

 I see some  old guys, "major names in the industry" home brewing park solutions, not maintaining their tanks/ solutions, etc.  and have long ago tossed the instructions and run by "feel or look".   That's not how chemistry works.  I was at another local guy last week and he was "re-doing" 15 guns that were parked by a guy that builds at least 150 parked guns a year.  He's not the only one, I've seen lots of it over the years as well as finishes failing in the field months down the road.   I'd love to park here myself, but the volume is too low and there are lots of guys close by set up that do good work for cheap, so I limit finishing here to what we can't get done elsewhere economically like hot bluing 60" 45# parts.  Physically and chemically challenging in a t-shirt :o.

 

So how's this project going anyhow?  Any new pics?


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#22 DZelenka

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Posted 15 February 2016 - 10:21 AM

No new pics. However, if anyone is interested in seeing a Lend Lease M3 that has had the bar removed and been reparkerized, there is one for sale on Sturmgewehr.com. This gun is interesting to me because it was likely built the same day and was shipped to Britain at the same time as mine. They are only about 200 apart in serial number. Whether I parkerize or paint my M3 (provided I get it), I will not be removing the bar. I think it looks like crap.

 

Dan

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#23 Got Uzi

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Posted 16 February 2016 - 10:27 AM

That is why I welded a new bar on my M3GG that was sent overseas.  Mine still had the two "tits" from where they used a hacksaw and cut the bar off so they could replace it with the regular magazine release guard.  I have seen several like that one and to me they are worth less than one with the bar on it as part of the lettering is gone.

 

I'd be curious to know what serial numbers shipped when.  My gun is a 1944 with a serial number in the low 180,XXX's.


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#24 DZelenka

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Posted 16 February 2016 - 10:37 AM

If your gun is in the 180,xxx and these two are 186,xxx, I would bet they were built really close in date. They may have been on the same ship headed to England. I don't know the production rate of the M3 but it had to be at least as high as the TSMG. My email address is dan@dzelenkalaw.com I would appreciate if you would send me some photographs of your gun. I am collecting a few for personal reference purposes.


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#25 Got Uzi

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Posted 16 February 2016 - 12:47 PM

I sent you some pictures from my phone.  They will show up as a Verizon number in your email.  I included pictures of before and after I added the bar back over the magazine release.  I will be refinishing it once the weather warms up.  I would still like to find a British proof marked barrel for it.


Edited by Got Uzi, 16 February 2016 - 12:48 PM.

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#26 DZelenka

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Posted 16 February 2016 - 04:13 PM

I received them. Thank you.


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#27 Got Uzi

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Posted 17 February 2016 - 06:49 AM

I will send you pictures of the finished product once it warms up as my heater is out in my machine shop so its too damn cold to paint.  Notice how your not able to tell the original bar was removed?  I tried to make sure that the welds would blend in to the old ones.


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#28 reconbob

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Posted 16 March 2016 - 09:40 PM

Of course we all have our opinions but if you parkerize a British era M3 you are
Immediately changing it from original as these guns were not parkerized. They were
painted. I have one and when I got it there were several shiny spots where the paint
had been damaged and the underlying steel was a raw, shiny silver color.
If it was me I would gently remove the glue with acetone or a similar solvent and
With very fine steel wool remove the excess paint. There is no reason to sandblast
a gun like this any more than you would sandblast a M1921 Colt. When you get most
of the excess paint off you've done no damage (sandblast) and you can re-evaluate
when you see what you've got. And yes, leave the bar over the mag catch.

Bob
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#29 DZelenka

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Posted 17 March 2016 - 09:10 AM

Bob,

 

The more I look at the gun, especially the inside, the more I believe it was factory finished with paint rather than parkreized with subsequent paint over the park. If it had been parked prior to painting, there would or should be areas where the paint was worn but the park remains. Of those, I can find none.

 

Dan


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#30 JMW-1955

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Posted 25 April 2018 - 02:45 PM

Hi Fellas, I have a refinish job going. Were the magazines & bodies of the grease gun different colors or the same? I was thinking of a flat OD. Many thanks, Jim
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