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New - Colt Thompson in French Service


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#41 ron_brock

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 05:56 PM

I added to the title a bit to help. Here is the info from Gordons last book. Looking forward to seeing this one in person!!

Attached File  F7C46EFC-F86E-45EE-82D0-D9AAB147AA03.jpeg   22.58K   53 downloads

The term pearl was confusing as there was a few guns made called Pearl. This gun however was a pearl in hiding. Very nice with a great history.

Ron
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#42 Jack Wright

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 06:22 PM

I realize the wrath that I am about to bring down upon myself but nevertheless here goes:
Don’t change out ANY parts. Shoot it exactly the way it is. That’s how it came out of the
factory and that’s how it was meant to be shot. These guns were not made to be babied.
Shoot the bejesus out of it exactly the way it is and enjoy it!
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#43 ppgcowboy

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 06:33 PM

Shoot it with changed parts, and parts that can be replaced, including a different lower, and display it with the Colt parts.
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#44 mohawk64

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 06:36 PM

I wouldn't shoot it at all
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#45 SAW23015

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 06:51 PM

I would never buy any gun that I would not shoot, I know many do and that's okay. Not into guns for the money but for the fun of shooting then just like the were made.


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#46 83Baron

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 07:01 PM

Actuator and bolt swapped out, and only the finest factory ammo and have at it!
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#47 ron_brock

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 08:07 PM

I realize the wrath that I am about to bring down upon myself but nevertheless here goes:
Dont change out ANY parts. Shoot it exactly the way it is. Thats how it came out of the
factory and thats how it was meant to be shot. These guns were not made to be babied.
Shoot the bejesus out of it exactly the way it is and enjoy it!


This year at TATA a member was shooting his 28 Navy Overstamp, the actuator ear broke during firing. High cycle fatigue is a common failure mode on many original Colt profile actuator ears. The thin cross section is prone to breakage over time. He will likely spend $2,000 to $3,000 to replace this part if lucky enough to find one. At the time he was unaware. Lesson learned but there is a difference in enjoying a gun for what it is and taking a blantant gamble. Id at least change the few parts mentioned by seasoned veterans if you plan to shoot it.

Several of us are still shooting Colt guns, but common care should be practiced to prevent breaking rare and very difficult to replace parts.

Ron
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#48 Jack Wright

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 08:34 PM

The breakage was certainly unfortunate, but how many are shot where nothing breaks. The 21 Colt shoots in
a unique way and replacing the original actuator with a 28 actuator will certainly alter the way it shoots. To each his own,
but I would rather it shoot the way it is supposed to shoot rather than like something else...
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#49 jim c 351

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 09:31 PM

Jack,

WW2 28 actuators , machined to 21 specs are available from several gunsmiths.

This pretty much eliminates your justification for doing something incredibly stupid.

Jim C


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#50 ron_brock

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 09:33 PM

The beauty of that is gunsmiths who produce new parts. I shoot my Colt with a milled down GI actuator, PK hybrid buffer and pilot system and new 21 spring. Shoots just the way it was designed and no worry of turning my $1500 21 actuator into a junk Colt actuator.

There are options to have the same as designed functionality without risking a rare original part breaking.

Ron
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#51 ppgcowboy

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 09:40 PM

The breakage was certainly unfortunate, but how many are shot where nothing breaks. The 21 Colt shoots in
a unique way and replacing the original actuator with a 28 actuator will certainly alter the way it shoots. To each his own,
but I would rather it shoot the way it is supposed to shoot rather than like something else...


Sorry you giving bad advise. When the Colts were being shot like wild ponies, the Colt parts were easier to replace and they were not the collector pieces they are today. Protecting the high value and hard to replace items is the best advise to take. Just bcause you have a 4 wheel drive does not mean you have to bury it in mud or take it boulder hopping. I do not see many Mercedes SUV's on the logging roads elk hunting.
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#52 Jack Wright

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 10:23 PM

Bad advice, you say? What I am saying is simply this: you shoot your guns your way and I’ll shoot my
guns my way. I don’t swap parts out of anything. Prefer to shoot a gun the way it came from the factory.
If you prefer, you can do something else...
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#53 ppgcowboy

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 10:50 PM

I realize the wrath that I am about to bring down upon myself but nevertheless here goes:
Don’t change out ANY parts. Shoot it exactly the way it is. That’s how it came out of the
factory and that’s how it was meant to be shot. These guns were not made to be babied.
Shoot the bejesus out of it exactly the way it is and enjoy it!


You even capitalized the word any. Bad advise!!!
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#54 2ndArmored

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 10:52 PM

Free advice is worth what you paid for it.  And here's mine.  This is a rare firearm and irreplaceable family heirloom.  If something goes wrong, no amount of cussing will send you back in time to undo what you did.  "That's why we told him to swap out parts." Then he's not truly shooting his grandfather's gun anymore, so what's the point?  There are enough other Colt Thompson owners out there who can get you trigger time under the right circumstances to keep your risk/reward ratio reasonable.  I've got an original Colt 3rd Model Dragoon (1854) and an Uberti repro of the same revolver.  One's for fondling and one's for firing.

 

Stepping down from my soapbox now...


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#55 Jack Wright

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Posted 09 October 2018 - 11:06 PM

Well, you all have the advantage of me. I personally find it incomprehensible that anyone would own a gun that
he is afraid to shoot. But, that’s just me. I would LOVE (there are those caps again) to shoot the gun that is
the subject of this thread, but not with so many parts swapped out that you have to read the markings on the
receiver to know what you are shooting...
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#56 Slightly Twisted

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 02:01 AM

Thanks for all the information and advice. We have shot it multiple times. two or three times about 20 years ago, and about a month ago trying to up load a video.
Im still just blown away about the possible history. I really wish I new more about how my grandfather got the gun. We have a trunk full of old letters he sent home after the war we are rereading to see if he talked about it at all. What little info I have Ill try and write up as I understand it.

I cant seem to get them to work Im not the most techy person.

Attached Files


Edited by Slightly Twisted, 10 October 2018 - 02:04 AM.

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#57 JJX

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 07:57 AM

Congratulations and thank you Slightly Twisted for sharing.

I encourage you to keep searching for info on your grandfather. My dad was a WWII vet who passed away 10 years ago and we are still coming across old letters and documents relating to his war service that he never mentioned. He was in Germany near the end of the war, but the coolest thing he brought back was a sword.


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#58 SAW23015

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 08:02 AM

Great videos and a beautiful gun, enjoy it.


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#59 Motorcar

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 10:22 AM

That's cool video, thanks for sharing it! It's a museum piece that you own, awesome!


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#60 Merry Ploughboy

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Posted 10 October 2018 - 01:23 PM

Does it have the nickel plated oil can in the buttstock?

 

Do you have era correct stick and drum magazines?

 

If not, things to ask Santa to bring you for Christmas.

 

In any case, enjoy!


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