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#1 horsemarine

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 09:12 AM

Greetings;

Beginning with a model 60 a few weeks ago, I have migrated to the .22 trainers. My question today concerns the MC-58. It appears that the USMC PROPERTY roll mark disappeared late in the contract, from that point on, US remains as well as the acceptance stamp in the wood. Can anyone shed light on the change? Specific serial number break point? 

 

One theory occurred to me as I write; These late guns were after fulfillment of the USMC contract. H&R was directed to discontinue the USMC mark the same way Colt's removed USMC from the CQB overrun. or, H&R anticipated orders from adjacent services.

 

Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.

Keith.

 


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#2 n64atlas

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Posted 14 May 2019 - 12:03 PM

Mine is USMC marked and is in the 6300 serial number range.

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#3 horsemarine

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Posted 21 May 2019 - 01:11 PM

Still searching but I think I can disproved my previous comment:

 

"One theory occurred to me as I write; These late guns were after fulfillment of the USMC contract. H&R was directed to discontinue the USMC mark the same way Colt's removed USMC from the CQB overrun. or, H&R anticipated orders from adjacent services."

 

I pulled the buttplate off 2 rifles in the 9100 range. In addition to the matching numbers on the wood and plate, the wood is hand stamped USMC.

 

 

Any thoughts, ideas, additional buttplate findings would be appreciated.

Keith


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#4 emmagee1917

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 01:30 PM

Well , we know the numbers on the butt and the plate were to mate the two fitted parts back together after each was seperated after fitting to be finished in their own lines . If the factory was running more than two lines of .22s ( a mc line and a commercial line ) they might have used / continued the hidden USMC marking to make sure the wood went to the correct line . Or it may just be the wood stampers never got the message . 

Example , in WW2 a member of the cannon crew would leave the cannon after his particular task was done . He would then watch from afar as the cannon fired , then would return to do his task again . Someone finally asked why he did this . They had to research back a bit to find that he had another job to do away from the cannon ….. help hold the horses while the cannon fired so they wouldn't bolt .

Chris


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#5 horsemarine

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Posted 22 May 2019 - 01:47 PM

That makes sense Chris. Thanks


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#6 dalbert

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Posted 27 May 2019 - 04:30 PM

Well , we know the numbers on the butt and the plate were to mate the two fitted parts back together after each was seperated after fitting to be finished in their own lines . If the factory was running more than two lines of .22s ( a mc line and a commercial line ) they might have used / continued the hidden USMC marking to make sure the wood went to the correct line . Or it may just be the wood stampers never got the message . 

Example , in WW2 a member of the cannon crew would leave the cannon after his particular task was done . He would then watch from afar as the cannon fired , then would return to do his task again . Someone finally asked why he did this . They had to research back a bit to find that he had another job to do away from the cannon ….. help hold the horses while the cannon fired so they wouldn't bolt .

Chris

 

emmagee1917,

 

What other production line would have been using MC58 stocks?  As far as I am aware, the model did not see civilian production.

 

David Albert

dalbert@sturmgewehr.com


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#7 emmagee1917

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Posted 28 May 2019 - 01:15 PM

None that I'm aware of , but commercial .22 lines used stocks as well and a mixup could cause a screw up cut that would make said stocks unuseable , thus a loss of time and money .

Current example .... bought a Ruger SR1911 10Mm first part of the month ...liked it , but only had 2 mags ...ordered 4 more .... recieved them...opened one up and checked fit and function , was good ....rest marked Ruger and 10MM and in same packaging and part number ….drilled and taped and mounted mag pads ...started to load them up to go shoot....they held 7 rds rather than 8 ...too short …. Officers rather than full size …. now have to unmount pads , return to sender , get correct ones, sender has to send them back to factory . Lost freight cost , time and labor , etc.

Chris

 

PS …. does anyone know of a Ruger SR1911 Officer / Defender style 10MM ? I don't , but why make mags for a non-existant gun ?


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