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What Happened to all the Thompsons After WW2?


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#41 colt21a

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 01:23 PM

The Germans had to be better shots a five shot bolt action.. They did not have to worry on spray and pray until issued the K-43 G-43 and MP-44 ask any living WW 2German Vet today. He will tell you.

If you have both. you can enjoy the best. And the P-38 like the Hi-Power great stuff. heck its History.

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#42 Kilroy

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 01:39 PM

If you read commentary about guns, even in books, you get lead up some blind alleys.
 
A lot of information is just stories that went back and forth for decades.
 
Most people will quickly believe a story that romantic or interesting, and they ignore the boring version that is actually the truth.
 
Unless you can verify a story, you shouldn't believe it too much.

  

I know a gentleman, who is 101 years old now. His name is Albin Irzyk and hes written four books. He retired from the army as a Brigidar General and during World War II he was a Lt. Col. Commanding Combat Command B of the 4th Armored Division. He received the Distinguished Service Cross, several silver stars and two Purple Hearts during World War II. He saw a lot of combat. Ive sat down with him many times in his home and listened to his stories. He says during World War II no one complained about the Sherman tanks. Everyone thought they were great. Did they have issues? Yes, but doesnt everthing have its issues? He said everyone loved the Sherman tank up until the 1970s when another veteran Belton Cooper wrote a book called "Death Traps" that everyone began hating on the Sherman and its become commonplace to distain that tank. I could tell several stories of his enumerating why the Sherman was superior to the German counter parts (too many to type up here though) but after that book, they were damned and everyone jumped on the bandwagon of the Sherman was horrible. Another case of people who werent there making up a reality thats get taken as truth.



This is a really interesting topic and I find it kind of funny that it never occurred to me before.
 
What the heck did happen to all those Thompsons?  bottom of the sea?  smelter?  warehouse in greece?
 
we collectors and US police forces are holding a tiny fraction of the total production.

Buzz,
Yes, yes, and yes.  It is pretty amazing, isn't it?  And not just for Thompsons!  As Colt21aRon points out, so many other weapons too, and not limited to the USA.  Add BARs, mess kits, 60mm mortars, the list is endless.  There have to be many storehouses, warehouses, ship-sized containers etc. all over this country and the world filled with treasures.  Local lore has it (western Nebraska) that the US Army, in the dead of night, buried countless tons of .30 and .50 ammo along with M1 carbines, Browning M2s, in ravines southwest of McCook.  The really old boys around there say it's true but are not providing any coordinates.  So there's another scenario. 
In my town, there was an Army Air Base that trained pilots. After the war was over allegedly there were many surplus things... jeeps, Air plane engines, etc. some of it was taken to a hole and dump in and covered up and the rest taken to the ocean and dumped a few miles off shore. One of the guys I used to work with his brother in law was there when they pushed all these surplus items into the pit and covered them up. Today, there is a college dorm built on the site.

Edited by Kilroy, 21 December 2017 - 01:41 PM.

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#43 buzz

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 04:08 PM

If you equipped the US troops with P38s and MP40s and the Germans with Thompsons and 1911s, it would not have made the tiniest little scrap of a difference in the outcome of any battle.

 But if you equipped U.S. troops with Mauser K98 and Krauts with M1 Garand ( "the greatest battle implement ever devised"*) your declaration falls flat.

 

* Gen. Patton

 

 

No kidding, Arthur.

 

https://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Straw_man


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#44 Arthur Fliegenheimer

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 05:00 PM

No kidding, Arthur.

 

https://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Straw_man

buzz, on 06 Mar 2017 - 00:18, said:

 

When everyone's thinking alike, then nobody is thinking.

https://en.wikipedia...ity_experiments

  

"Wikipedia is like an old and eccentric uncle.

He can be a lot of fun—over the years he's seen a lot, and he can tell a great story. He's also no dummy; he's accumulated a lot of information and has some strong opinions about what he's gathered. You can learn quite a bit from him. But take everything he says with a grain of salt. A lot of the things he thinks he knows for sure aren't quite right, or are taken out of context. And when it comes down to it, sometimes he believes things that are a little bit, well, nuts."

 

Charles Seife (2014). Virtual Unreality: Just Because the Internet Told You, how Do You Know It's True?. Penguin Publishing Group.


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#45 inertord

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 05:58 PM

"If the German Air Force had had the Browning .50-caliber, the Battle of Britain would have turned out differently." German Field Marshal Herman Göring
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#46 Arthur Fliegenheimer

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 06:13 PM

"If the German Air Force had had the Browning .50-caliber, the Battle of Britain would have turned out differently." German Field Marshal Herman Göring


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#47 ron_brock

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 09:18 PM


No kidding, Arthur.
 
https://en.wikipedia.../wiki/Straw_man

buzz, on 06 Mar 2017 - 00:18, said:
 
When everyone's thinking alike, then nobody is thinking.
https://en.wikipedia...ity_experiments

  
"Wikipedia is like an old and eccentric uncle.
He can be a lot of funover the years he's seen a lot, and he can tell a great story. He's also no dummy; he's accumulated a lot of information and has some strong opinions about what he's gathered. You can learn quite a bit from him. But take everything he says with a grain of salt. A lot of the things he thinks he knows for sure aren't quite right, or are taken out of context. And when it comes down to it, sometimes he believes things that are a little bit, well, nuts."
 
Charles Seife (2014). Virtual Unreality: Just Because the Internet Told You, how Do You Know It's True?. Penguin Publishing Group.

Very appropriate and absolutely made me laugh out loud for multiple reasons.

Ron
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#48 Paladin601

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 10:34 PM

"If the German Air Force had had the Browning .50-caliber, the Battle of Britain would have turned out differently." German Field Marshal Herman Göring

 

The brits did not have the Browning either, they had the 303 vickers


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#49 Paladin601

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 10:38 PM

My guess there are still many unregistered Thompsons out there, for the same reason that if they had a gun registration now, many would not register them. I had an very well known authority on the Thompson, tell that he believe that there are more full auto guns now in Civilian hands then before  Reagan's ban. I believe him.


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#50 richard w.

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 07:11 AM

"If the German Air Force had had the Browning .50-caliber, the Battle of Britain would have turned out differently." German Field Marshal Herman Göring

 

The brits did not have the Browning either, they had the 303 vickers

.303 Brownings on Spitfires and Hurricanes.


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#51 1952HRA

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 08:17 AM

I know this is a little off topic but while we are talking about the British and Browning 50 Cals, did the British change the 50s to 303s on the Mustang p-51s and Corsair F4Us we sold them?
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#52 Paladin601

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 11:50 AM

 

"If the German Air Force had had the Browning .50-caliber, the Battle of Britain would have turned out differently." German Field Marshal Herman Göring

 

The brits did not have the Browning either, they had the 303 vickers

.303 Brownings on Spitfires and Hurricanes.


They were Brownings?, Cool, always thought they were vickers. Didn't that violate the neutrality act? Or were they manufactured in Britain?


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#53 Arthur Fliegenheimer

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Posted 22 December 2017 - 12:39 PM

They were Brownings?, Cool, always thought they were vickers. Didn't that violate the neutrality act? Or were they manufactured in Britain?

 1981 film "Eye Of The Needle"

 


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#54 anjong-ni

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 03:58 PM

In actuality...it was the Mosquitos.... Phil

"In 1940 I could at least fly as far as Glasgow in most of my aircraft, but not now! It makes me furious when I see the Mosquito. I turn green and yellow with envy. The British, who can afford aluminium better than we can, knock together a beautiful wooden aircraft that every piano factory over there is building, and they give it a speed which they have now increased yet again. What do you make of that? There is nothing the British do not have. They have the geniuses and we have the nincompoops. After the war is over I'm going to buy a British radio set then at least I'll own something that has always worked."....Air-Marshal Goering...
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#55 Mk VII

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Posted 23 December 2017 - 07:06 PM

The Colt gun was selected to replace the older Vickers types in the late Thirties, but with so many modifications that it was felt desirable to give it a distinctive name. In particular the Air Staff insisted that the gun must be made in Britain so as not to depend on foreign supply, and it must fire the same cartridge as the Army for logistical reasons. Air trials revealed a propensity to 'cook off' after a really long burst,  - which the Air Staff Specification had insisted was required - something which cordite-loaded ammunition was more likely to do, so the mechanism was changed to cease fire with bolt open. N.C.- loaded ammunition was also ruled out for logistical reasons. Initial supplies of guns were made by Colt, and thereafter by Vickers-Armstrong and BSA, with Standard Motors chipping to help later on.    Although some of the early American-made aircraft such as the Brewster Buffalo were rearmed with .303s, in an attempt to lighten them and improve their dismal performance, later ones were used as they came.


Edited by Mk VII, 23 December 2017 - 07:07 PM.

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#56 Big Al

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Posted 26 December 2017 - 07:48 PM

Someone stated here in the past that M1-type Thompsons can still be found on (I believe) Los Angeles class submarines.


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#57 2ndArmored

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Posted 26 December 2017 - 08:28 PM

There is always a story about some veteran that dies and their kids find a gun, grenade or something hidden in the Garage. There is a book on the Thompson cannot think of the name (blue Cover) that while in France researching the book, a number of people showed him Thompsons and other guns that were not turn in after the war, in case France was invaded again.

In England an Woman died who had been in MI-6 during the war, and she still had her Sten Gun in the attic.

I am sure many more will start turning up as the veterans get fewer from that war.

Dad's a WWII vet - still alive at 91.  He said GI's were shipping home enough trophy MP-40's and K-98's to fill the Queen Mary.  "Slightly used" Thompsons (separated into parts) et cetera.  And about half of them never made it to those homes, intercepted by the guys on the docks.  A change of address and off they went.


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#58 buzz

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Posted 27 December 2017 - 05:46 PM

Someone stated here in the past that M1-type Thompsons can still be found on (I believe) Los Angeles class submarines.

 

 

why would the navy bother with thompsons?

 

they'd have no parts or ammo in their supply network

 

what does the navy pay for a new M4 assault rifle?  $600 maybe?  the sub probably burns that much money with every spin of the propeller


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#59 dalbert

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 12:22 PM



Someone stated here in the past that M1-type Thompsons can still be found on (I believe) Los Angeles class submarines.

 
 
why would the navy bother with thompsons?
 
they'd have no parts or ammo in their supply network
 
what does the navy pay for a new M4 assault rifle?  $600 maybe?  the sub probably burns that much money with every spin of the propeller
They don't use M4's to internally guard the nukes, for fear of damaging them if a weapon is fired. They normally use shotguns, from what I understand. I may have been the one who mentioned the Thompsons still being in use, because a friend of mine indicated they were still in submarine use up through at least 1992, when he left service in Navy subs. I don't recall what subs he served on. I don't think they would have a need for many spare parts in such a limited role, but I did not ask my friend that question.

David Albert
dalbert@sturmgewehr.com
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#60 Ron Mills

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Posted 28 December 2017 - 07:50 PM

David, as a side note---a nephew of mine served in the Navy in the 1980s.  The ship he served on (not a sub) still had M3 Grease Guns complete with flash hiders as active arms at that time.  


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