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Gaging A Thompson - New Book


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#1 Taliaferro

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Posted 15 June 2020 - 10:05 AM

Attached File  FINAL FRONT COVER.jpg   177.27K   49 downloads

 

 

 

A new book should be available through Amazon Kindle books this week. The book's title is:

Gaging A Thompson: Manufacturing Inspection Tools

 

By Tracie L. Hill

 

The books is 420 pp color photo soft cover book. List price is $100.00.

 

The book describes the treasure trove of inspection gages found a few years ago and explains the

intended use of each gage. This book will not be for everybody. But, is intended to educate a student

of the Thompson on just how complex the design was to manufacture. 

 

If you are coming to The All Thompson Show and Shoot and are interested in a copy PM me and 

I will have your copy sitting awaiting your arrival.

 

Thanks to David Albert, Tom Davis, Roger Herbst, Sutton Coffman and Paul Gromkowski for all of their time

and help on this project.

 

Tracie Hill

 

 

 


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#2 Gio

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Posted 15 June 2020 - 03:30 PM

Thanks Tracie just what I needed another Thompson book. You know how to push my hot button. Will have to order this P M.

Frank
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#3 Paladin601

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Posted 17 June 2020 - 12:05 PM

Purchased.

I am as sucker for Thompson manufacturing books.


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#4 TD.

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Posted 17 June 2020 - 12:20 PM

Paladin601,

I believe you and all Thompson enthusiasts will enjoy this book. The production and inspection gages are simply amazing. And there is more!

 

Here is a link:

 

https://www.amazon.c...92414096&sr=8-1

 

All the gages will be on display at this years Hill family All Thompson Show & Shoot.

 

 


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#5 Paladin601

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Posted 17 June 2020 - 01:30 PM

Paladin601,

I believe you and all Thompson enthusiasts will enjoy this book. The production and inspection gages are simply amazing. And there is more!

 

Here is a link:

 

https://www.amazon.c...92414096&sr=8-1

 

All the gages will be on display at this years Hill family All Thompson Show & Shoot.

Thanks TD


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#6 Taliaferro

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Posted 17 June 2020 - 01:33 PM

If anyone wants an autographed copy just PM and I will sign one and send it to you.

 

PM me with details.

 

Thanks

 

Tracie Hill


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#7 Tiz

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Posted 20 June 2020 - 09:18 AM

TATA book signing? Cool


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#8 Gio

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Posted 23 June 2020 - 06:43 PM

My book came in the mail this PM. This book is not for everyone but if you are a mechanical nut like me I found it very interesting. Seeing those gages at the Creek when T.D. and David first made the deal on the batch they looked in real bad shape. The next time I saw them was at the TATA show. Tracie has spent a incredible amount of time putting this book together in a interesting read.

 

Tracie thanks.

Frank


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#9 reconbob

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Posted 29 June 2020 - 01:07 PM

Received my book today. I agree it is not for everybody but filled with many fascinating

photos of parts and gages. I am very happy with it and will enjoy reading it.

..BUT...the book was shipped (by Amazon) in a thin, flimsy

bubble envelope which was completely unable to protect the book - which is a soft cover -

book weighing 2 1/2 lbs. Not what I expect for a $100 book.  Mine looks like it was

dropped on the corner one or more times and did not arrive in new condition. Its not

worth it to fight the battle but I would caution others not to order this book until there are

assurances that it will be shipped in a BOX so it will arrive undamaged.

 

Bob


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#10 Gio

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Posted 29 June 2020 - 02:12 PM

Bob,

My book came from Amazon and was packaged the same. Mine looked as if it had been dropped once.


Frank
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#11 TD.

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Posted 29 June 2020 - 03:13 PM

Bob & Frank,

I too have had trouble with the packaging from Amazon. If any of the books I buy arrived damaged, I request a call and the books are replaced. A few times I have had to take a picture of the damage and upload the pictures - easy enough to do. I always purchase 10 or more books and they are packed in a box but often without enough packing material. It is like, what are you thinking! When I get a folded cover or bent corner, I bitch. And so far it seems to have worked! 

 

I am sure Tracie would pack all the books he sells directly in a box. I use a cardboard book cover when shipping but my books are not near as many pages as the Gage book.


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#12 Taliaferro

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 01:27 PM

Sorry to hear about the Amazon shipping issues.

 

Any books ordered through me are shipped in cardboard book boxes.

 

Tracie


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#13 Paladin601

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 03:42 PM

I concur, ORDER it from Tracie.  Mine came from Amazon as well. If I knew Amazon would of shipped it in a bubble envelope, I would of had second thoughts. But if it was damaged in any way, Amazon would definitely hear about it.


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#14 Paladin601

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Posted 30 June 2020 - 03:47 PM

Received my book today. I agree it is not for everybody but filled with many fascinating

photos of parts and gages. I am very happy with it and will enjoy reading it.

..BUT...the book was shipped (by Amazon) in a thin, flimsy

bubble envelope which was completely unable to protect the book - which is a soft cover -

book weighing 2 1/2 lbs. Not what I expect for a $100 book.  Mine looks like it was

dropped on the corner one or more times and did not arrive in new condition. Its not

worth it to fight the battle but I would caution others not to order this book until there are

assurances that it will be shipped in a BOX so it will arrive undamaged.

 

Bob

My guess is that by using "CNC Centers" has completely eliminated the use of Gages in the manufacturing of your receivers?

I was surprised that gages were even used for exterior profile radius's and the scalloped machining. Openned up a lot on early 20th century machining and manufacturing.


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#15 Taliaferro

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Posted 01 July 2020 - 06:48 AM

Even in this computer age, I am seeing a return to templates. They are a low tech accurate

check that can be done on an assembly line without the need to drag the machined part into a QC area for

a cmm to inspect.

 

Tracie


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#16 ron_brock

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Posted 30 July 2020 - 10:55 PM

Bump to the top to remind me (and others) to order one.

Ron
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#17 Frank Iannamico

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 07:57 AM

Recommended,

 

I like history, it is pretty amazing that the gages, used to build Thompsons nearly a century ago, have survived.

Kudos to Tracie for finding the gages, figuring what they were used for AND documenting it.  

 

Nice detailed photos too.


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#18 Vettom

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 09:11 AM

got my Tracie signed book too, I find this info very interesting, thanks for all the efforts.


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#19 giantpanda4

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Posted 31 July 2020 - 12:03 PM

Yes, very interesting.

 

As an engineer (retired...), I can appreciate all that goes into the manufacture of these gauges (gages?) as well as the day to day use.

 

I think the hardest part was deciphering what each one did. Once that was figured out, and all the cleaning and photography done, it sure made a great story.

 

Thanks a lot - the effort in doing the book is very appreciated!


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#20 reconbob

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Posted 01 August 2020 - 11:25 PM

I just saw the note about manufacturing receivers. I can
only speak for myself (Phila Ordnance). When we make the
receivers, once the tools are set in the machining center (which
holds 90 tools but we only use about 45 for Thompsons) the
only time we need to check or change anything is when a tool
breaks or gets dull.
We 100% inspect the barrel thread, the trigger frame rails,
and the grip mount slot, but everything else is pretty much
OK. If it's a 100% receiver of course we check the bolt pocket
and angle cuts for the bronze lock.
We have a variety of measuring and gaging tools such as
gage pins, calipers, micrometers, etc. which take the place
of the specialized gages enumerated in Tracies book.
Of course, we are not making hundreds of thousands as
they did back in the day. Today most likely a lot of checking
would be done by computerized coordinate measuring
machines, but there is often nothing better - and simple -
than GO and NO GO gages as seen in the book.
The beauty and simplicity of a GO/NO GO gage is that
it enables a barely skilled worker to accurately check a part
and not have know how to use precision measuring tools
such a micrometers, etc.
A factory during the time when the Thompsons were
made would have had a huge floor with hundreds of
simple milling machines where each machine would be
set for a specific cut on a part. Frequently the machine
would not have hand wheels but use a simple lever for
the operator to make the cut. Ten operations or cuts
might be done on ten machines with the parts passed
down the line.
In this environment the almost idiot proof gages
as found in the book would be used to quickly and
easily check the parts as they moved down the line.

Bob
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