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GEG Stamp inside 1928 Savage


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#1 Scott

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Posted 07 March 2019 - 08:03 PM

Just got this Savage 1928 after almost a year waiting on the form 4. It does not have any military markings on the outside so assumed it not military. When I dissambled it there was a GEG inspector stamp on the bottom of the upper receiver near the rear sight. Anyone know the story behind this?

Attached File  Thompson 6.JPG   107.75K   112 downloadsAttached File  Thompson 1.JPG   315.06K   108 downloadsAttached File  Thompson 2.JPG   314.83K   112 downloadsAttached File  Thompson 3.JPG   210.76K   133 downloadsAttached File  Thompson 4.JPG   219.21K   131 downloadsAttached File  Thompson 5.JPG   305.35K   108 downloads


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#2 Frank Iannamico

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Posted 07 March 2019 - 08:08 PM

Even more interesting is the location of the Bridgeport address; at the rear of the receiver.

Some Savage Thompsons in your serial number range were marked like that. 

 

There is a photo in American Thunder III, page 120, of Savage Model of 1928 serial number S-93528 with the Bridgeport address at the rear of the receiver That Thompson, part of the Royal Armouries collection at Leeds, England, has the British Woolwich Arsenal Crown-W acceptance stamp. 


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#3 rpbcps

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 06:17 AM

S85140 is another Model of 1928 which has the Bridgeport address at the rear of the receiver, I'll check next time I am in the UK if that one has a "GEG inspector stamp on the bottom of the upper receiver near the rear sight".

 

Attached File  2. 85140 Serial No & Model.JPG   144K   35 downloads   Attached File  4. 85140 Brideport addresss & Patent No.s.JPG   163.5K   35 downloads

 

In my extensive notes on TSMGs, I have wrote:

"The first 20,000, (approx.), Bridgeport address 1928’s had the 13 patent numbers roll-marked in the centre of the right-hand side of the receiver and the address at the rear.

From around serial number 100000, this was changed again, the address was roll-marked at the centre of the receiver and the patent numbers were moved to the rear, the final change in the layout, which continued to be used on the subsequent lend lease US 1928A1’s"

 

Stays Safe

 

Richard


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#4 67ray

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 09:15 AM

Even more interesting is the location of the Bridgeport address; at the rear of the receiver.

Some Savage Thompsons in your serial number range were marked like that. 

 

There is a photo in American Thunder III, page 120, of Savage Model of 1928 serial number S-93528 with the Bridgeport address at the rear of the receiver That Thompson, part of the Royal Armouries collection at Leeds, England, has the British Woolwich Arsenal Crown-W acceptance stamp. 

 

 

I don't have access to that book here in Nantucket, can you post a pic of the British Woolwich Arsenal Crown-W acceptance stamp?


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#5 rpbcps

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 01:25 PM

 


Even more interesting is the location of the Bridgeport address; at the rear of the receiver.

Some Savage Thompsons in your serial number range were marked like that. 

 

There is a photo in American Thunder III, page 120, of Savage Model of 1928 serial number S-93528 with the Bridgeport address at the rear of the receiver That Thompson, part of the Royal Armouries collection at Leeds, England, has the British Woolwich Arsenal Crown-W acceptance stamp. 

 

 

I don't have access to that book here in Nantucket, can you post a pic of the British Woolwich Arsenal Crown-W acceptance stamp?

Attached File  2a 85140 Woolwich stamp.JPG   174.5K   24 downloads  Attached File  ROF Woolwich Stamp.JPG   11.28K   15 downloads


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#6 WCG

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 02:25 PM

Coincidentally I was just wondering what that GEG mark was,

I just bought another Thompson, a British purchase (cash & carry) 1928, Savage, S-86354

It has the Crown-W on the front left hand side of the receiver and along side is a GEG in a circle.

There is no GEG inside the receiver.

Only other marks are the arrow with ESA underneath either side of the receiver at the front

I'll try to post pictures, but at the moment that's defeating me.

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#7 rpbcps

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 02:51 PM

Coincidentally I was just wondering what that GEG mark was,

I just bought another Thompson, a British purchase (cash & carry) 1928, Savage, S-86354

It has the Crown-W on the front left hand side of the receiver and along side is a GEG in a circle.

There is no GEG inside the receiver.

Only other marks are the arrow with ESA underneath either side of the receiver at the front

I'll try to post pictures, but at the moment that's defeating me.

 

George E. Goll, “Rifleman Demonstrator”, begun his association with Auto Ordnance as John T. Thompsons driver. He was AOC's longest serving employee. He also accompanied John T. Thompson on his European sales tour in 1921, Here he is firing a burst from a Model of 1921, before an interested audience of British officers, at Bisley Camp, the Headquarters of the National Rifle Association of the United Kingdom.

 

Attached File  George E Goll AO Civilian Inspector during WW2.JPG   13.27K   17 downloads  Attached File  demo1.gif   24.75K   28 downloads 

 

George E. Goll continued his employment with AOC into the 1940’s, in the capacity of AOCs civilian inspector at the Savage Arms Corporations Utica plant between 1940 and 1944. He left his legacy in his encircled GEG stamp, found on most of the Thompson guns produced by the Savage Arms Corporations.

Attached File  GEG Bridgeport Post June1945.JPG   128.05K   28 downloads

 

Stay safe

 

Richard 


Edited by rpbcps, 08 March 2019 - 05:07 PM.

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#8 WCG

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 05:35 PM

Thanks Richard,

That's interesting. Just checked my Savage 1928 A1 and it's marked with the GEG (so faint I never noticed it before)

I'm waiting on my friend at the Royal Armouries here in the UK to decipher the other British marks on the 1928.

 

The 1928 probably has a story to tell as it ended up in Norway. Supposedly left by the Royal Marine Commandos.

It has the typical British top-mounted sling, but a straight fore end,

Given it a service and some new springs so ready for the range!

 

Cheers

Richard


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#9 WCG

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 05:38 PM

By the way,

The Bridgeport address on my Savage 1928 S-86354 is at the rear.


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#10 Sig

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 05:40 PM

sharing a picture

 

Attached File  GEG picture tip.jpeg   73.26K   9 downloads

 

 

 

 

 

 


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#11 Rimcrew

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Posted 08 March 2019 - 06:12 PM

Is that an original stamp?  If so, how the heck did you acquire that?

 

What an amazing piece of history to own...


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#12 Sig

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Posted 09 March 2019 - 07:41 AM

Is that an original stamp?  If so, how the heck did you acquire that?

 

What an amazing piece of history to own...

Here is an article on it.

 

Attached File  GEG stamp article.pdf   1.12MB   73 downloads


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#13 Adg105200

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Posted 09 March 2019 - 08:59 AM

Wow, awesome piece of history!

Andrew
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#14 rpbcps

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Posted 09 March 2019 - 03:55 PM

Thanks Richard,

That's interesting. Just checked my Savage 1928 A1 and it's marked with the GEG (so faint I never noticed it before)

I'm waiting on my friend at the Royal Armouries here in the UK to decipher the other British marks on the 1928.

 

The 1928 probably has a story to tell as it ended up in Norway. Supposedly left by the Royal Marine Commandos.

It has the typical British top-mounted sling, but a straight fore end,

Given it a service and some new springs so ready for the range!

 

Cheers

Richard

 

The Norwegian Navy were using Thompson SMGs through till the 1970’s, so yours may have been an issued weapon with the Norwegian forces, rather than one let by the commandos. 

 

If the commandos had left the Thompson behind, it may have ended up looking more like these ones:

Attached File  Norwegian Find.JPG   75.98K   28 downloads  Attached File  Norwegian Find 1.JPG   78.81K   30 downloads

 

Here is a photo of the cover of a Norwegian Thompson Manual.

Attached File  Norwegian TSMG Manual.jpg   240.41K   24 downloads

 

Stay safe

Richard


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#15 WCG

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Posted 10 March 2019 - 05:54 AM

I know the Norwegians had loads of cast-off equipment after the war,  we have had large quantities of K98 rifles (chambered 30-06) into the UK recently from Norway.

Maybe this Thompson was given to them post war, but I'm assuming the British Acceptance marks and sling position point to it's original purchaser?

My interest in purchasing it was because I have a 1928 A1, an M1, and an M1A1, so I needed a 1928 to complete the set of WW2 issue models, and a British one seemed perfect.

It's not likely to get shot too often as I prefer to use the M1A1 which was unissued, unfired when I got it so has no period patina.


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#16 rpbcps

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Posted 10 March 2019 - 09:16 AM

I know the Norwegians had loads of cast-off equipment after the war,  we have had large quantities of K98 rifles (chambered 30-06) into the UK recently from Norway.

Maybe this Thompson was given to them post war, but I'm assuming the British Acceptance marks and sling position point to it's original purchaser?

My interest in purchasing it was because I have a 1928 A1, an M1, and an M1A1, so I needed a 1928 to complete the set of WW2 issue models, and a British one seemed perfect.

It's not likely to get shot too often as I prefer to use the M1A1 which was unissued, unfired when I got it so has no period patina.

 

 

I agree 100% about the original buyer of the weapon being the British war Office, but I think  they would have been passed on 'officially' to the Norwegians rather than just being ‘left’ by a commando on some raid, is what I meant. Some Norwegian forces were based in Britain in the early years of the war, I have some photos somewhere of them in a location called "Glenmore Lodge", with not only Thompsons, but Lugers and other assorted weapons in their armoury. Indeed the Norwegians even used the British Transit Chests for the storage of their weapons, one recently came up for exchange in Norway a colleague informed me, but had  high asking ‘price’.

 

If you are based in the UK, I am intrigued how you can fire Thompsons, intrigued and anxious to find out how I can get the opportunity to fire one again, in the UK? The only opportunity I had to fire them in the distant past, was while serving in a reserve sqn. of the 11 EOD Regt., when attending training at the Kineton Army School of Ammunition. What did they not have there to shoot was the question, their stock of arms and ammunition was incredible, at the time.

 

Stay safe

Richard


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#17 WCG

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Posted 10 March 2019 - 11:37 AM

I'm a gunsmith and supplier to the film industry, so I have a Section 5 license.


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#18 rpbcps

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Posted 10 March 2019 - 02:05 PM

I'm a gunsmith and supplier to the film industry, so I have a Section 5 license.

 

I am envious, a dream job!

 

PM sent

 

Stay safe

Richard


Edited by rpbcps, 10 March 2019 - 02:39 PM.

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#19 Autorotate

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 09:33 AM

Richard,

Were the relic Thompson’s you have pictured found under water or under ground? Any other details as it their “story” ?
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#20 Chief762

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Posted 12 March 2019 - 01:24 PM

I bought Col. Terrence McCool's WH28 a few years ago. George Goll put his stamp on it in several locations, as they were friends. Does anyone else have a Westie that has a GEG stamp? Just curious.

Chief762 


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