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Very first Thompson build: some misc. questions (21 v. 28, parts resto


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#21 Motorcar

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Posted 13 February 2020 - 11:27 AM

"It's Okay, Don't worry. 07/02"  nice one  :D


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#22 shadycon

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Posted 13 February 2020 - 11:30 AM

Very well done folks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ;)


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#23 67ray

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 11:18 AM

Related to the tangent topic of legality, what is the case for an NFA gun that was registered (whether demilled or functional) but current possessor doesn't have paperwork?  Is there a way to change the registration of such an item to the current possessor?

 

Could see this fairly common as people might become infirmed/pass away without transferring


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#24 TD.

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 11:52 AM

This situation has certainly occurred in the past. I believe it is most common with the older dewats, many times where the original owner or heirs had no idea any paperwork was required for ownership, much less transfer. It is my understanding if the properly registered weapon stays with the Executor or the family, i.e., spouse or sibling, the ATF is very amenable to transferring the NFA weapon to an eligible recipient. Once the weapon leaves the control of the registered owner or lawful heirs of the registered owner, the situation becomes much more problematic and often results in forfeiture.

 

I post this just as general information. I am sure there are much more knowledgeable sources for this subject on the forum. Please do not take the above post as an absolute. Each situation is different!    


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#25 reconbob

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 12:27 PM

   Yes, this came up a lot some years ago when the greatest generation vets started

passing away. back in the 1970's when I first had my gun shop it seemed like every

month or two somebody walked in the shop and wanted to know what to do with the 

Grease gun, MP-40, Thompson, MP-44, etc. etc. Dad brought back in his dufflebag.

This happened so often that my opinion then (and now) is that there are as many -

or more - unregistered MG's out there than there are registered MG's.

 

   My belief at the time was that if you contacted the ATF about an MG for which you do

not have the registration paper, that the ATF would confiscate the gun and make no effort

to check and see if it was on the registry.

This was why just about all of these people thought that the best thing to

do was to do nothing and keep ATF out of it.

 

   The only people that contacted ATF were survivors or executors who were afraid of

guns and didn't want guns in the house.

 

    I am sure others have had different experiences and will offer different opinions.

 

Bob


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#26 Tiz

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 01:55 PM

Interesting, just last week I was speaking to the local ATF office on another matter and this subject happened to come up (I find most agents are rather chatty ). Anyway, this particular agent related some of his experiences with regard individuals discovering, for example, a NFA weapon in granddads attic after his passing. The agent stated that they make every effort to find out if paperwork exists on the weapon in question and if so assist the heir in getting the item legally conveyed to them so they can keep it or sell it. If the NFA item was never entered into the system and it has some historical relevance he told me they make an effort to move it to a museum or similar institution in order to preserve it. Only then, when all avenues are exhausted, are they forced to dis[pose of the weapon. At least that is what I was told.


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#27 reconbob

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 02:22 PM

      Times change. I hope that this is indeed the case. The era I was talking about was less than 10 years

after the upheaval of the 1960's - the assassinations, the 1968 gun control act and the 1968 MG amnesty,

plus it was an urban area (Philly). So it would not surprise me if they were more gung ho back then.

 

Bob


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#28 Tiz

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Posted 14 February 2020 - 02:33 PM

The agent I spoke with was out of the Pittsburgh, PA office. He came across as very sincere and believable. 


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