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M1 Bolt Notches


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#1 Cheesebeast

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Posted 19 January 2004 - 03:30 PM

Hello All,

I have a newbie question about the safe operation of my M1 Thompson. When I cock the bolt back to the open bolt position the sear catches it. But I can cock it about 3/4" back further and the sear catches it again. When it is disassembled I see that there are two notches in the bolt. I can apply the safety with the bolt in either position. Frankly, I don't remember if I had the weapon on semi or full (if that makes a difference) when I noticed this. Are the two notches in the bolt something to do with semi auto functioning?

I apologize if my semantics are not correct in my description of the parts involved. Hopefully you can get an idea of what I mean from my description. My Thompson is an M1 model- it has an M1 bolt (the firing pin is not fixed).

Thanks in advance,

Cheesebeast
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#2 PK.

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Posted 19 January 2004 - 10:24 PM

There are two notches in either the 21/28 or M1/A1 bolts (towards the front of the rectangular body) which will hold the bolt in the cocked position, one a little further back than the other. The “first” notch catches the bolt in the rear most position. The “second” notch is about 5/8” back of the first and will allow the bolt to be that much further forward when cocked. It’s purpose is to catch the sear if the first notch misses it in semi auto fire.

The third notch in the M1/A1 bolt (towards the rear of the bolt) allows the sear to raise up so the safety can be engaged with the bolt closed.

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#3 Cheesebeast

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Posted 20 January 2004 - 09:24 AM

Thanks once again, PK!

Best to you,
Cheesebeast
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#4 PK.

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Posted 20 January 2004 - 09:46 AM

My pleasure.

Interesting moniker; care to share the origins of it?

I love cheese myself, just about any kind. I remember reading once that they did a survey of solders returning from WWII concerning what food they missed the most. It was widely speculated that the answer would be chocolate, but it turned out to be cheese.

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#5 Cheesebeast

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Posted 20 January 2004 - 11:07 AM

Hi PK,

I had a tomcat once that seemed more interested in the cheese in the refrigerator than in the mice that scampered in the walls of our old house. I figured he wasn't really a cat, but instead was a "cheesebeast". The name stuck and since his passing into the great dairy beyond (no, not from lactose intolerance) I have used it as a moniker. I myself am partial to cheddar, particularly Cabot Hunter's Select.

I didn't know that cheese was unavailable to our G.I.s. in WWII. I remember reading in Currahee (Sp?), Currahee, Currahee that they were able to snag some German rations and they mentioned the cheese in tubes was "pretty good". My grandad fought in New Guinea, and as the son of a dairy farmer you would think he would have mentioned the lack of cheese. Probably being shot at by the Japanese was a more pressing worry!

I have had the cheese sauce from the "new" MREs and it isn't bad. I am sure it is a form of currency for our soldiers!

Best to you,
Cheese


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#6 TSMGguy

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Posted 20 January 2004 - 09:59 PM

Yes, we lusted after German cold rations anytime they were attached to us in any capacity (3rd US Cavalry, REFORGERs 1975 and 1977). We traded for them shamelessly. REALLY enjoyed the cheese in tubes, mustard, dark bread and sausages. I'll bet that those ration types had been around forever. The FRG troops considered our C rations to be rather tasteless, but liked the pound cake!
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