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Non-walnut 28 Buttstock


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#1 Gunner

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Posted 05 February 2004 - 05:50 PM

I recently received a 28 parts kit from IMA. Very nice. The metal was in better shape than the furniture, so I've started refinishing the wood. I noticed that the buttstock seems a lot lighter than a couple of other Thompson buttstocks I have. The grain seems different from other walnut stocks. I was wondering if there were other woods used instead of just walnut. This is a non-cross-bolt stock, serial no. 8503 (I think; it's hard to read first number.) The metal parts seemed to be blued and then pained with black paint (by the Brits?). Came with milled buttplate. Just curious. Thanks.
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#2 gijive

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Posted 05 February 2004 - 06:42 PM

Hi Don,

They did apparently use different wood during wartime production, but the numbered butt stocks are pretty early production. Maybe the grain varied on walnut depending on how it was cut? Deerslayer is the wood guy, maybe he knows what else was used.
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#3 AZDoug

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Posted 05 February 2004 - 06:44 PM

Serial Number? Like under the buttplate? Does the buttplate have a serial number on the inside also? Do they match?

I think only original Colt buttstocks had serial numbers on them, and that was where they were located. Too bad it was painted and refinished, if so.

Doug
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#4 Arthur Fliegenheimer

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Posted 05 February 2004 - 06:46 PM

There are examples of blond wood color buttstocks.
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#5 deerslayer

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Posted 05 February 2004 - 06:56 PM

I've looked at a few vintage 1928 stocks that differed from almost blond (walnut) to a chocolate (walnut) color. I've noticed the same in actual walnut trees that I've cut down though Iowa walnut is usually either a chocolate color or a reddish brown color. I've got a table that was made in Pennsylvania from walnut that my grandpa cut. It is very light in color. As to what was used by Remington or savage, I have no knowlege.
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#6 Gunner

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Posted 05 February 2004 - 07:07 PM

I may have miscommunicated earlier. What I was trying to say was that the wood seems a lot lighter -- in weight, not necessarily in color.

AZ, The serial number is on the rear end, the part that is covered by the buttplate. There is a serial number on the buttplate, but it doesn't match --5217.
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#7 21 smoker

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Posted 05 February 2004 - 07:33 PM

Gunner,...my butt stock seemed to be less dense wood than other stocks from IMA,..but it is walnut no doubt with serial number, oiler and oiler felt, that was a surprise.They sent 2 butt stocks one new,real dark stain and figured..I like it a lot,and the actuator was knurled...IMA quality pretty good.What do say about yours? I wish the parts kits were Savage for a rewat project I got going.TIA
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#8 AZDoug

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Posted 05 February 2004 - 07:53 PM

OK.

I have run across non-crossbolt stocks that appear to be made of poplar or some other wood. They have a funny grain, in that they are somewhat iridescent (poor choice of a word, but I don't know how to descibe it) in one direction, but not the other when finished with a linseed oil. I have one of these on my WH gun. I also know walnut varies in density and some are heavier than others..

I did not know that early non-colt guns had SN'd stocks. I wonder what the purpose was for that, and numbering the buttplates, except for maybe the stocks were fitted to the plates, then both were numbered, and the buttplates went to the blue tank and the stocks to the varnishers, and the plates and stocks were matched up again afterwords so the fit was perfect?

That seems like a lot of work for a military gun, and maybe that was the intention, but during refinishing nobody gave a crap about cosmetics, and buttplates and stocks were just assmebled without regard to matching the numbers up.

You could have Colt wood though, somebody familiar with the fonts used in the stampings could possibly tell.

I got a 1921 stock a few years back for next to nothing, that looked like it sat in the sun and rain for 30 years before I got it. Not much rust on the metal, but the wood was sunbleached like an old barn. The numbers matched on those. I refinished it the best I could (it actually looked OK), and somebody gave my $400 for it, because it didn't have a sling swivel cut out.

Doug


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#9 Gunner

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Posted 05 February 2004 - 09:06 PM

21 Smoker,

I was satisfied with my kit -- til I heard you got 2 buttstocks. Did you pay extra?

I'm not sure made the barrel, but it is new or almost new. Frame was by A.O., with AO or Stevens internals. Bright bolt was very nice.
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#10 21 smoker

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Posted 06 February 2004 - 12:30 PM

Gunner,... didn`t mean to bust your bubble... I received internal kit with butt stock kit in Oct.. tried to reorder same thing and IMA said they no longer would sell individually,...you have to buy whole kit for 1k.1 butt stock was crossbolt..really nice,and internals were great.enjoy what you got...it`s worth it, every penny.KEEPEM`SMOKIN`,out. wink.gif
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#11 LIONHART

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Posted 08 February 2004 - 07:26 PM

I've owne some Birch examples. Really nice, and stronger than Walnut too.

Edited by LIONHART, 09 February 2004 - 12:39 PM.

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#12 Arthur Fliegenheimer

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Posted 08 February 2004 - 09:00 PM

Birch stronger than walnut? They make those cheap aftermarket handguards for M1 Carbine's out of birch. Yuck!
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#13 Arthur Fliegenheimer

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 12:46 AM

And there in lies the problem. They stain it to look like walnut. I suppose you could make stocks out of oak also, but it seems walnut has been the go to wood for stocks for centuries. Birch may be fine for an attic stairway, where it might be subjected to weights exceeding hundreds of pounds, but how many times is a buttstock used as a ladder? I mean the weakest point of a 1928 TSMG buttstock is where it latches to the frame. The attachment will fail before the walnut buttstock does.
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#14 colt21a

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Posted 09 February 2004 - 01:01 AM

chinese chu wood...............and nam ding how tuck........take care,ron
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