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Bolt Manufactures?


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#1 Woody

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 08:48 PM

I justed picked up a 1928 bolt that has the letter P stamped on side, who made this bolt? I know S is for Savage, a block-style S for Stevens, A.O.C. for Auto-Ordnance, and R for Remington. Thanks for your input.
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#2 PK.

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 09:02 PM

Petroleum Heat & Power of Stamford, CT subcontracted the bolts marked on the left side with a “P”
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#3 gijive

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 09:07 PM

Woody,

If the bolt is a blued bolt, check the rear end for a Savage "S." I believe the P on the side is a proof mark, not a manufacturing mark. On the other hand, it could be a subcontractor of Savage. The letter "P" was a letter code for Pitney-Bowes Corporation on other subcontracted Thompson parts.

In other words, I'm not sure what the "P" means. smile.gif
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#4 PK.

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Posted 11 February 2004 - 09:39 PM

Most of the bolts that I have encountered marked “S” on the back have the subcontractor mark “P” (identified as Pet. Heat & Power in Amer. Thunder) on the side. Other makers I have seen do not have the “P” marking. I seriously doubt it is a proof mark; it would be quite an unusual one as single characters were almost universally used to designate makers. The proof on the barrel and receiver were a prick punch mark within a ‘P’, or just a prick punch mark alone; more characteristic of a proof.
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