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Ww2 Wood Transit Box For '28


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#1 koldt

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Posted 30 July 2003 - 09:21 PM

I picked up this wooden transit case about 12 years ago and is one of those projects that just never gets completed. But this winter it will get done laugh.gif The wood is very dry and brittle. Any bump or nick will usually chip off small flakes. The corners are a tongue and groove/piano hinge style that have mostly just come apart. This is the major thing that needs fixing, with I think, some wood glue.

1.Case front showing handle and locks. Also note the "Karachi" (Pakistan? Venezuela?). Also the "England". There is some other writting that needs to be deciphered, with different sets of stencils on different layers of paint.
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2.Case rear showing the marking Montreal. So my Canadian content rule still applies for my collection.
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3.Top corner of the case showing the "Box 107 of 258" Wonder where the other 257 boxes went??
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4.Box open, with my Bridgeport '28 inside. Room for the complete "heater" with butt removed. 3 L drums & 6 XX mags. There is a small parts bin, in the corner. Cleaning rod on lid riveted in place by a couple of very dried leather strips. Various strips of felt to protect.
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5.Showing seperate mag compartments.
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6.Receiver taken out. Entire interior is wooden.
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7.Empty box showing interior and area for the butt. There is a 'V' groove in the seperation wall that holds the butt snug.
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8.And one last cheap, self loving, space wasting, obnoxious pic of my '28 cool.gif
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Hope this didn't bore ya guys. Again any questions or better yet if you can shed any more light, puleeeez give me a shout.
Thanx.






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#2 Grey Crow

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Posted 30 July 2003 - 09:37 PM

I used to use a wood preservative for bee hives that helped stop dry rot, it really penetrated. Let me do a little research and see if I can find it. You might just look into Thompsons wood products as well!

I'm really a skinny dude, I don't think I would want to carry it far fully loaded.
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#3 deerslayer

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Posted 30 July 2003 - 10:32 PM

I saw a photo of these cases a while back, considered making a replica or two. Very nice photos. A guy could almost reverse engineer the thing, but would there be any chance of getting the measurements?
Dan
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#4 JimFromFL

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Posted 02 August 2003 - 05:14 PM

Nice pictures.

It is nice to see another piece of Thompson history not seen before.

Thanks for sharing.

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#5 Ron A

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Posted 02 August 2003 - 07:11 PM

Great photos - did you see the item on Ebay several months ago - a wood
box which held 2 thompsons with the stocks attached? also more than one drum. The owner had no idea what it was..
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#6 koldt

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Posted 04 August 2003 - 12:29 AM

Nope, I didn't see the one on ebay. Dan, I will try to get some measurements at the same time as I get the corners glued. biggrin.gif OK, I will try to get them sooner....
Thanks for the tip on the preservative..
Any kind of info on the boxes would be a plus. I still have very limited info on them..

Brad
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#7 Walter63a

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Posted 04 August 2003 - 01:51 AM

Koldt, Karachi is the major port city in Pakistan. So, the Karachi marking on the box is not at all surprising (being a part of the British Empire {India} during WWII). The England, and Montreal markings also point to British Empire provenance. I realize that Canada was granted semi-autonomy (under the British North America Act it became a Dominion of the British Empire) from the British Empire in 1867, but I believe that it remained a part of the British Connomwealth of Nations, along with Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, India, Burma, Rhodesia, Hong Kong, etc. At any rate, being a Canadian citizen, I'm sure you know that Great Britain called upon all parts of the Empire for assistance during WWII and also had to protect those far-flung interests worldwide. As far as the grey color goes, the navies of most major powers in WWII painted all their ships, and nearly everything on and/or in them, 'battleship grey'. My father was a U.S. WWII veteran of the Pacific Theater and he brought back some things (alas, no Thompsons) in very similar colored wooden boxes (plain wood inside and grey outside), but without the metal handle on top (wooden handles on the sides). I hope this helps a little. biggrin.gif
Regards, Walter
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#8 Mk VII

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Posted 05 August 2003 - 01:58 AM

Cogswell & Harrison were, at one time, owned by Sam Cummings, the Interarms milsurp king.
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#9 koldt

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Posted 05 August 2003 - 05:14 AM

Great, thanks. Who are the Cogswell & Harrison on the box? I am assumeing a firearms dealer, but any other info would be super.
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#10 Walter63a

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Posted 05 August 2003 - 08:41 AM

Cogswell & Harrison was established in 1770, and has been billed as London's oldest surviving gunmaker.
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#11 koldt

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Posted 06 August 2003 - 05:44 AM

Walter, Found their web site, and I am going to send some better pics of the address written on the box and see if they can contribute anything. Thanks again!
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#12 Walter63a

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Posted 06 August 2003 - 11:03 AM

Brad, let us know what you discover. I would not be surprised if they contributed to the war effort by packaging, shipping and/or making guns. smile.gif Regards, Walter
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#13 Walter63a

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Posted 08 August 2003 - 04:07 PM

Brad, I was just leafing through Tracie L. Hill's excellent, Thompson:the American Legend, looking for more info. on the original Colt 21 models of Thompson, when I stumbled upon a photo of your transport box on page#221. According to Hill's book and information he apparently gained from the British Imperial War Museum, these transit chests (filled with fully accessorized 1928 Savage Thompsons) were to be used to fight the Nazis in their anticipated invasion of England (Hitler's Operation Sea Lion). They were kept in secret explosive dumps and gun rooms, until needed by Winston Churchil's Home Guard Special Units (essentially clandestine guerrilla groups) to defend Great Britain. When this did not occur, undoubtedly many of these transit boxes and their contents were shipped to areas around the world, where they were needed during the remaining years of WWII. I think you have a really interesting piece of history there. Take good care of it. smile.gif Regards, Walter
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#14 koldt

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Posted 08 August 2003 - 05:45 PM

Walter, Thanx a bunch! Puleeez don't laugh, I still don't have the book.... sad.gif Maybe if I look pitifull enough for Christmas my wife can ask Santa for me.. laugh.gif I have emailed some pics and request for information to the Cogswell & Harrison address.. As soon as I hear anything, I will report back. Cheers,
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#15 Walter63a

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Posted 08 August 2003 - 06:08 PM

Brad, I'm not laughing, its an expensive (but well worth it) book. I paid $85 here in the U.S.; It probably would be about $100 in Canada. Anyhow, I thought that you might not have it, so I included the extra information. blink.gif smile.gif Regards, Walter
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#16 koldt

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Posted 09 August 2003 - 10:53 AM

Well, I received a reply very promptly from C&H. Although they could not provide any hard information on the boxes, they did interpret the address. smile.gif


Cogswell & Harrison (Gunmakers) Ltd.,
Thatcham House 95 Sussex Place Slough SL1 1NN
Tel: 01753 520866 Fax: 01753 575770 e-mail: info@cogswell.co.uk

August 9th 2003

Dear Mr

The address you partly deciphered was most probably:

Cogswell & Harrison Cannon Works Bollo Lane Acton London W3

There are two photographs of the Cannon works in the Cogswell & Harrison history book Pages 46,47,48 refer to some of the activities in the Acton factories during WW2 and in the post war period.

During the war, millions of parts and thousands of weapons were transported by Cogswell & Harrison all over the world under British Government contracts. I am sorry to say that we have no information at all in our archives on transit boxes.

We trust this will be of interest and wish you well with your research

Regards

C&H Archives
______________________________________________________

"Cogswell & Harrison: Two Centuries of Gunmaking" published in the UK by the Sportsman's Press is now available in the USA from Safari Press.

A copy of this book can be obtained by mail order from Safari Press. The USA price is $39.95. A resume can be accessed by logging on to www.safaripress.com accessing the firearms section and clicking on Cooley G. & Newton N.
________________________________________________________________________


Reg No: 1638115 RFD: TVD 71 VAT No 366 2798 11



Gives us a little bit more than what we had. rolleyes.gif I am sure they had their plates full during '39-'45, so they weren't too interested in documenting wooden boxes.

Brad

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#17 Walter63a

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Posted 09 August 2003 - 02:21 PM

Brad, thanks for the additional information. I might just have to pick up a copy of their book. I would imagine that not too many of those boxes still survive 60+ years later; It would make an interesting display in your house or a museum (especially filled with a 28 Thompson and all the proper accessories). It might be a project to consider. Well, that's my two cents worth. biggrin.gif Regards, Walter
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#18 koldt

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Posted 09 August 2003 - 03:51 PM

Walter, I am hoping that it won't have to go to a museum for a few years yet, and can stay in my display. But unfortunetly with our government, you never know sad.gif
I am having a WW2 recruiting poster mounted. It has a picture of a Canadian officer who won the Victoria Cross during the clearing of the Dieppe beachhead. He has a Bren in each hand and a Tommy Gun tucked under his arm. Once mounted I think it will make a good wall hanger.
Thanks for the info on Cogswell & Harrison.
Brad
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#19 Walter63a

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Posted 09 August 2003 - 04:03 PM

Brad, you are welcome. smile.gif Hey, maybe you could post a photo of that poster here on this board. I'm sure a lot of us would love to see it. Enjoy it while you can. cool.gif Regards, Walter
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