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Tsmg "shooter" 1928 Vs. M1


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#1 Johnny.45

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 09:49 AM

Hi,
I am looking for a TSMG that I can shoot. I was wondering what configuration most TSMG owners prefer as a "shooter": the 1928 variants or the M1/M1A1 variants?
I am concerned about reliability, safety, maintenance, and parts availability.
I have read about the safety issues concerning the slam fire bolt on the M1A1 setup so I'd probably stay away from that bolt if I went with an M1 variation, but I am also wondering about the problems if any with the blish lock and the breech oiler associated with the 1928 variations. Also I am interested in opinions on going with or without a compensator.
Any recommendations and opinions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks for your time,
Johnny
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#2 Kevin

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 11:48 AM

My .02. All Thompsons are safe and reliable. If not - it is because the individual firearm needs some TLC. There are people on this board that can cure any problem. Parts are avialble for any model, but the prices are going up. It comes down to which version you like and how much you want to spend.
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#3 PK.

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 12:08 PM

For me; I’d choose the 28.

There are no short comings to the Bliss lock or oilier. Because the lock retards & “times” the action, the 28 is a much smoother, regular and softer shooting gun that the M1. I find the latter to be “jarring” because of the heavier, unrestrained bolt and, depending on the ammunition, inconsistent. You can put a “21 kit” into your 28 and enjoy a different feel with the higher cyclic rate. Dressing it up as “chopper” or GI A1 variant can be fun also. Just depends on which hat you want to wear that day. Don’t forget the M1 won’t take drums; if the ban sunsets, we might get some reasonable C drums on the market.

Both models are equal in reliability, safety, maintenance, and parts availability. There are a few 28 parts that are getting harder to find, but if you get spares in the next couple years you should be fine. This is a very popular gun and good parts will always be available from custom makers. Your comments about the M1 bolt are correct in my opinion.

The Cutts will help muzzle climb, but this is not a major issue. Assuming you shoot with hearing protection, the added muzzle blast from the Cutts can actually be pretty cool when shooting from the hip. The plain sight has a definite appeal to some as it provides a very clean and short appearance.

FWIW

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#4 Bisley45

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 12:08 PM

The 28 has a detachable butstock, and takes the drums and has a cutts comp, which works but can be a bitch to clean. The M1 is easyer to take appart and has less parts to clean or misplace on a workbench. Reliability is more a function of your ammo as I doubt any self respectiong shooter is going to drag his baby threw the mud after the hassles of a tax stamp. Parts are simple, stock up now as prices are just going up. It all comes down to personal taste, asthetics, and unfortunately depth of pocket book.

BB
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#5 Chopper28

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 12:20 PM

Personally, I would go with the 28. You can dress it up to look like the gangster weapon ofthe 1930's or you can outfit it to look like the GI issue weapon of WWII. The drum is a big plus. Nothing like dumping 50 rounds in 4-5 seconds. There is just no mistaking that classic look with vertical foregrip and the L or C drum. Really cool.
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#6 Walter63a

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 12:30 PM

Johnny.45, my personal preference is the 28, so I agree with Kevin, PK, Bisley45, and Chopper28. They gave great advice, so I won't add anything, except that there are a lot of guys out there who love their M1/M1A1's too. smile.gif Regards, Walter
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#7 Johnny.45

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 12:31 PM

Kevin, PK, & BB,

Thank you all for the replies. All your information and experience really helps. It makes my research in the world of the TSMG much easier. This Board really is a great resource.
I will continue to look for a Thompson "shooter" probably a 1928 version.
Is there any truth to the W.H. 1928's having reciever problems ie cracking from fatigue?
I read a post that stated that some W.H. 1928 receivers had cracked.

Anyway thanks again,
Johnny
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#8 Johnny.45

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 12:35 PM

Chopper28 & Walter63a,

Thanks for the posts. I think I will heed the advice and narrow the search to 1928's.
I just needed some guidance. Thanks for the help.


Stay Safe,
Johnny
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#9 PK.

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 02:09 PM

There was a time when some promoted “speed bolts” and cutting the ears off the locks to supposedly enhance reliability and increase cyclic rate. Guns so modified are asking for trouble; they are way outside their original design parameters. The cases of cracked receivers of which I am aware involved these modifications and or hot handloads.

While the WH receivers are softer than the Savage, Bridgeport or Colt guns, this actually makes them less likely to crack under normal use (soft gives, hard breaks). They will wear out faster, but not in your lifetime. If you get a WH that has not been “blue printed”, expect to pay some extra to get it set up correctly. Once done it will be a good shooter.

Receiver cracking is a non issue in a stock gun of any make.

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#10 Johnny.45

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 02:54 PM

PK,

That is outstanding information. Thank you so much for taking the time and answering my questions. It is a huge help. As stated I'm looking for a 1928 shooter, and that means probably a WH 1928 version. I'm just trying to educate myself along the way.
Your knowledge and wealth of information are greatly appreciated.
Any other suggestions, tips, recs... re: this matter are most welcome.

Stay Safe,

Johnny
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#11 John Jr

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Posted 07 August 2003 - 11:41 PM

Cant belive that an M1 or M1A1 owner hasn't come in here and shreaded this 28 hype. (I have a 28!)

biggrin.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif biggrin.gif smile.gif smile.gif smile.gif smile.gif smile.gif smile.gif smile.gif
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#12 hughlong

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Posted 08 August 2003 - 12:03 AM

If you can find one, I would recommend the Group Industries 1928 TSMG. I saw one for the first time several months ago, it was at a show and I believe was recently at Knob Creek as well.

It had a M1 grip frame and a ring front sight(over a threaded plain barrel) and a M1 late style rear sight.

I changed out the grip frame for a GI 1928 frame and put on a GI compensator.

The gun will make a great shooter and the M1 rear sight I think is more useable than the original 28 sight(i got one of those while the getting was good, but I don't have any immediate plans to install it; apparantly there are examples of the military using the later M1 protected sight on 1928s.

anyway, I am not sure how many are out there, but I am real pleased with this one. The receiver is great quality and I think it is more interesting than a West Hurley.
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#13 Johnny.45

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Posted 08 August 2003 - 09:34 AM

hughlong,

Thanks for the tip. I will keep my eyes open during my searches. Sounds like you have a nice gun there. Enjoy your TSMG.

Take Care,
Johnny
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#14 Brickyard

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Posted 08 August 2003 - 10:49 AM

Regardless of what or when you buy. REMEMBER, PK on these boards. If nothing else is said, it's the best piece of advise anyone can give.

PS - go 28, more versatile and the drum dumps are so cool.

Good luck!
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#15 hawksnest

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Posted 08 August 2003 - 11:26 AM

I am lucky enough to own an M1A1 and a 1928A1. I love both. I would hate to have to decide which one to sell.
The ability to use a drum in the 1928 is nice but the higher rate of fire of the M1A1 (using an M1 bolt) is also nice.
It will be interesting to see which kind of Thompson wins the steel plate shoot at the TCA show & shoot. (Assuming all shooters are equally skillful). Will a 1921 beat all? For the answer tune in after August 23.
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#16 Ron A

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Posted 08 August 2003 - 12:24 PM

My 2c's Nothing like a C drum dump - something you can't do with a M1 - I have both however!
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#17 Johnny.45

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Posted 08 August 2003 - 02:21 PM

Brickyard, hawksnest & Ron A,

Thank you all for your opinions and advice. I am leaning toward the 28 right now, but who knows. I appreciate all your help and experience re TSMG's. I am very aware of what a great resource this Board is, and I am very grateful for all the contributions.
I am glad to be a part of this forum.

You All Take Care,

Johnny
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#18 Bob

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Posted 08 August 2003 - 02:24 PM

I have a M1A1, M1 and 1928A1. I like all of them...but if I had to sell any of them the 1928A1 would be the last to go. As PK said, the '28 is a smooth as silk compared to the M1 series and the actuator is in the right spot! laugh.gif What were they thinking with the knob on the right side?
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#19 SecondAmend

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Posted 08 August 2003 - 04:57 PM

I suggest you compromise and buy at least one of each of the '28 and M1 versions.

And while you're at it, get a '21 as well.

Enjoy them all as long as you live and leave your heirs real pieces of history, not just a pile of cash.

I only have a '28 but my son and I have a great time with it. If and when I can afford to I will take my own advice. I may even get an MP-40 as well.

Any one (or more) TSMG's you buy is a good choice. All are likely to appreciate in monetary value and all are fun to shoot. No need for any post-purchase cognitive dissonance.

Good luck and have fun with whichever you buy!
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#20 Johnny.45

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Posted 08 August 2003 - 05:00 PM

Bob,

Thanks for that information. It helps alot. At present I'm researching and searching for 28's, probably West Hurleys due to funds. It seems to be the gun to shoot.
And yes I am paying close attention to what PK has stated earlier in the post.
I'm sure I'll be utilizing his services soon after the gun purchase.
I really appreciate the input.

Keep Safe,
Johnny
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