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Ever Tried Parkerizing?


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#1 LSU Tiger

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Posted 23 April 2004 - 09:17 PM

I was thumbing a Brownell's catalog today, and the thought hit me about doing my own parkerizing. Has anyone tried it? How did it look?
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#2 timg953

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Posted 24 April 2004 - 01:04 AM

Parkerizing isn't hard. I bought the pipe burner and stainless steel tank from Brownells about 10 years ago. You will need to be able to bead or sand blast your parts prior to parking. Be sure everything is degreased completely. I've heard of people parkerizing stuff on thier kitchen stoves but I personally wouldn't want the fumes in the house. I use the Amerlene Parkerizing solution sold by Brownells.
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#3 LSU Tiger

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Posted 24 April 2004 - 05:39 PM

OK, but timg953, does it come out gray or can black be attained? I'd love to know how a W W II weapon looked new, not 60+ years later.
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#4 LSU Tiger

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Posted 24 April 2004 - 10:15 PM

What is the black oxide process and what are the chemicals and steps?
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#5 LSU Tiger

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Posted 25 April 2004 - 09:40 PM

So, with no reference book in front of me, the W W II Thompsons were Dulite finished? huh.gif If that's the case, who can do this today?
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#6 timg953

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Posted 25 April 2004 - 11:20 PM

When using the Amerlene solution that Brownell's sells, I've found that the end color depends on how long you leave it in the tank, the kind of steel that it is and the all important oil pickling after you rinse the solution out with water. Example: Imbel FAL recievers come out a light grey color, U.S. GI Garands come out a dark grey green and occasionally the rear of the reciever is so dark as to alomst be black. I was told this is common on arsenal rebuilt M1s. What you might want to use is John Norrel's new WWII Grey/Green Moly Resin finish. We have used it and it's a dead ringer for the GI finish and much easier to put on, self lubricating and corrosion resistant. Durablitiy of a bake on finish with the looks of classic mil-spec parkerizing,
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#7 timg953

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Posted 26 April 2004 - 10:09 PM

#4 sand will give a nice matte finish and still be rough enough for the parkerizing solution to "bite". I used to repark the Blue Sky import Garands and Carbines for a local dealer that specialized in U.S. Military weapons. Some of the arlington ord weapons came out of the sand blaster and park tank looking like GI arsenal reworks because the import stamps were so light normal surface prep removed them.
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