Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Rebarrel 1928 Thompson


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 subgun45

subgun45

    Member

  • Regular Group
  • 28 posts

Posted 25 April 2004 - 11:47 PM

hello,how much trouble is it to rebarrel a thompson?what special tools are needed?where can they be found?how do you remove the front handguard mount? anybody out there ever done this?any help is appreciated...thanks

thanks to all that responded..i am a do-it yourself type..so i am hell bent to do this myself..how do you remove the piece that holds the handguard on? can anyone give me the address of the fellow with the barrel removal tools? thanks again...i love this site so far..thanks

Edited by subgun45, 27 April 2004 - 01:38 PM.

  • 0

#2 hawksnest

hawksnest

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 1008 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:central Ohio
  • Interests:Class III weapons

Posted 26 April 2004 - 07:29 AM

subgun45: My .02, send it to a professional such as PK, hardrede or Ohio Ordnance works.
  • 0

#3 SecondAmend

SecondAmend

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 610 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 26 April 2004 - 04:52 PM

Other possible gunsmiths to consider (no opinion as to competence or value of services rendered, merely reporting). Shipping may be less to one of these depending on where you live:

Tim La France
LaFrance Specialties
PO Box 82049
San Diego, CA
92138
1-800-432-6248


Sam W. Alvarez
T&S Manufacturing
1223 Mt. Vernon Rd.
Southington, CT 06489
860-628-8174



Stan Andrewski
603-746-4387

Good luck!
  • 0

#4 JimFromFL

JimFromFL

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 1877 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida

Posted 26 April 2004 - 08:41 PM

Is it the original barrel on an original Thompson (pre-West Hurley)?

If not, you may be able to remove it yourself. If it is, you could still do it yourself, but it may be a bit harder.

I have found that a 2x4 with an oval hole slipped over the compensator works pretty well.

There are some tools available to make it easier. Richardson would be the person to talk too about that item.

I would first try to remove it yourself because I find that I will remove the barrel every few 1000 rounds or so to allow it to soak a few days for a good cleaning and you wouldn't want to have to send it off everytime.
  • 0

#5 Hurridale

Hurridale

    Long Time Member

  • Regular Group
  • 86 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 26 April 2004 - 09:57 PM

Changing a barrel is a breeze. I just did it. Here's the only tool you'll need (PK's address):

> Diamond K
> 1390 E 7th St.
> Delta, CO 81416

Strip the receiver and send to PK (registered mail seems to be the cheapest option). He will charge you less than any barrel wrench I've seen advertised, plus will give you an honest appraisal of anything else that may need to be done.

Please realize that this is no put-down of other Thompsonsmiths. I'm speaking only from personal experience. I've never dealt with the other fine folks; I HAVE dealt with PK. I have no problem endorsing him.

He'll probably have it back to you faster than you can receive a wrench.

I absolutely love do-it-yourself projects. Still, working on my house is one thing, working on my Thompson is quite another. Half of being good is knowing what you're bad at. I am not willing to risk my Thompson to personal experimentation.

Regards,
DC
  • 0

#6 Grey Crow

Grey Crow

    RKI Member

  • Board Donor
  • 1077 posts
  • Location:North Central Pennsylvania
  • Interests:Thompson Submachine guns, computers, reptiles.

Posted 26 April 2004 - 10:47 PM

Gotta agree with Hurridale,

PK fixed a few messes I made, and has it running like a top. Installed a new bbl, rechambered it, adjusted for headspace, and shot it in for 0 @ 50 yards.

Figure the cost of tools, then the frustration, then throw in the possibility of destroying something.

Why go through it, when there are people that have the equipment and the know-how to get it right the first time.

From this day on I won't tinker with it. Can't afford to replace it!
  • 0

#7 Deputy 89C6

Deputy 89C6

    Long Time Member

  • Regular Group
  • 92 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 27 April 2004 - 08:40 AM

I have to agree...PK is the way to go...he's currently fixing one of my "stupid moments". The barrel is not tough to remove with a proper clamp, but making sure it's back in place properly is a little tougher.

Steve
  • 0

#8 marks

marks

    Long Time Member

  • Regular Group
  • 100 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Oregon
  • Interests:Full auto weapons.

Posted 27 April 2004 - 09:12 AM

QUOTE (Deputy 89C6 @ Apr 27 2004, 08:40 AM)
The barrel is not tough to remove with a proper clamp, but making sure it's back in place properly is a little tougher.


The tinkerer in me would be curious how one is put on correctly.
  • 0

#9 Deputy 89C6

Deputy 89C6

    Long Time Member

  • Regular Group
  • 92 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 27 April 2004 - 09:28 AM

When I put a new barrel on my M1928 I just tightened it down as tight as I could get it. By some miracle the weapon functioned properly. The real problem was getting the compensator to allign properly. If I tightened it (compensator) all the way down my post went beyond the 1200 position. It required backing off slightly and then drilling the barrel to add a pin to hold the comp in place. All the while you must make sure the compensator does not move as then the pin hole will be out of allignment. This was done ny a friend, while I went out of the room...I couldn't watch...one goof with the drill would have ruined a $190.00 barrel.

I then tried to remove a barrel from a M1927A1 to send to PK. Well, to make a long story short the leather pad over the end of the receiver slipped and now there is a very noticable wrench reminder on the receiver to let a compentent gun smith do it in the future. Now PK has the entire weapon in order to fix my screwed up work.

Steve
  • 0

#10 JimFromFL

JimFromFL

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 1877 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Florida

Posted 27 April 2004 - 08:29 PM

Are you able to just send off the receiver for someone to do some work????

I thought a special Form needed to be completed first.

  • 0

#11 AZDoug

AZDoug

    Regular Member

  • Regular Group
  • 200 posts

Posted 29 April 2004 - 02:34 AM

Just a comment:

Ff you have a kurt 6" Angle-Lock vise mounted to the table of a 3500 pound knee mill, put a piece of paper in the vise (to protect the receiver finish), and clamp the receiver in the kurt vise, up front where the threads are.

Then a Richardson barrel changing tools will loosen the barrel quickly. Unless, maybe it is a WWII gun, then send it to a TSMG smith that is comfortable applying heat to the receiver to loosen the barrel, if required.

Or, just send it to a TSMG smith.

Doug
  • 0

#12 Mike45

Mike45

    Long Time Member

  • Regular Group
  • 124 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Gulf Coast
  • Interests:shooting,hunting,fishing,drinking,eating.

Posted 29 April 2004 - 06:44 AM

Hi Guys, A simple way to remove bad bl. is to remove cutts and weld nut to bl. and use impact wrench. Whole process maybe 15 min.
  • 0

#13 PK.

PK.

    Technical Expert

  • Board Benefactor
  • 1567 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CO, USA
  • Interests:Full time gunsmith who loves Thompsons, 35+ years experience.

Posted 29 April 2004 - 08:17 AM

You guys are killing me !! ohmy.gif
  • 0

#14 PK.

PK.

    Technical Expert

  • Board Benefactor
  • 1567 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CO, USA
  • Interests:Full time gunsmith who loves Thompsons, 35+ years experience.

Posted 29 April 2004 - 08:33 AM

Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhh!
  • 0

#15 Grey Crow

Grey Crow

    RKI Member

  • Board Donor
  • 1077 posts
  • Location:North Central Pennsylvania
  • Interests:Thompson Submachine guns, computers, reptiles.

Posted 29 April 2004 - 09:20 PM

I simply drill a hole from the top of the barrel through and out of the bottom, then I place the receiver on the curb and back the car onto it. Using a steel rod placed through the hole like a "T" handle, you can unscrew the barrel from the frame. The weight of the car also helps to squeeze the receiver so that a much tighter frame to receiver fit is produced. (make certain that you do not have studded tires on the car) If you accidentally use studded tires you can simply apply plumb brown salts, and it gives the appearance of a slightly pitted and well aged gun.

The other positive aspect of this method is that you have a compensator built into the barrel..

PS: make sure that the drilled holes are far enough forward to prevent the escaping gasses from burning your hand.

Disclaimer: Please do not try this at home, it should only be attempted by an experienced driver on a closed track.
  • 0