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Rust "dots" On Colt 21/28


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#1 jim

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Posted 25 June 2004 - 10:17 PM

rust from an otherwise very nice 1921/28 Colt overstamp Thompson. Just came in today, very nice blueing with almost no blueing wear even on edges. The rust dots are only noticable if your about 3 inches from the reciever. Most are about the size of small pin-heads, appears that condensation in a closet did it.
I need a proven way to minimize the rust dots without removing or obscuring the original finish.

Any ideas will be appreciated,
Jim



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#2 John Jr

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Posted 25 June 2004 - 10:19 PM

Grab you some steel wool. Works great on rust. laugh.gif

(really... dont try that)

Jr
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#3 Z3BigDaddy

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Posted 25 June 2004 - 10:23 PM

Actually I do use steel wool, (fine), and WD40... It won't harm the blue.... Just use a light touch..... If you are worried about doing it, try it on your 22 rifle sitting in the corner with all the paint splatters on it.....
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#4 deerslayer

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Posted 25 June 2004 - 10:46 PM

A nice fresh pencil erasor has been just the ticket for me a time or two, also I've use a brass brush. Brass won't scratch the steel being to soft, but just stiff enough to take away the rust. I might seek PK's advice before trying any of these on $20+ grand worth of gun however.
Dan
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#5 Norm

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 12:29 AM

A Colt 21/28 Navy overstamp?

I personally would not try to remove it myself due to the value of the gun.

$20,000 is a lot of money! ohmy.gif

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#6 AZDoug

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 12:32 AM

Bronze or brass wool. Medium to fine withe WD-40 or kerosene. The soft bronze won't hurt the blue.

Doug
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#7 The1930sRust

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 08:59 AM

Rust on a Colt?!? Colt's rust?!? I didn't think their 'magical aura' would allow such a thing to happen;-) Seriously, I'd be real careful and real sober before making any decisions about this issue....
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#8 PATHFINDER

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 09:12 AM

Try sewing machine (or other light oil) and your finger tip. Even #OOOOOO steel wool is abrasive. That is why it works. Your finger will lift just enough off the rust dot on the initial contact to use as abrasive to remove the rest.

This removes the guess work: The rust is known to be softer than the steel yet it is exactly the same hardness as the rest of the rust dot. Sort of a "fight fire with fire" philosophy. Also using your finger tip gives you the best control to keep fron over working the job. One pass with steel wool and you may be suprised how much it 'removes'.


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#9 Sgt

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 09:15 AM

I've got a little surface rust spot on my Savage. I wonder if you keep that well oiled, if the rust would still have a tendency to worsen?
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#10 sten guy

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 09:29 AM

I use RIG stainless steel grease applied in moderation to the metal. It stays on the metal better than oil.
My .02.

STEN
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#11 Z3BigDaddy

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 09:30 AM

You understand that "bluing" itself is rust...

From shooting industry.com for neglected guns--->

"They make Powder Blast, which is an excellent cleaner to get dirt and debris out of the gun,” he said. “Then we recommend Break-Free CLP, which means cleaner, lubricant and preservative. If someone wants to do the cleanup themselves, we recommend grade 000 or 0000 steel wool to get the rust off without damaging the firearm.”


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#12 Mike45

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 10:34 AM

I recently got some rusty small parts and soaked them in "Blaster". It dissolved the rust without hurting the unrusted finish. The mfg. is Blaster Inc. ,Cleveland,OH. ph.800 858 6605 It works great :P
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#13 SecondAmend

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 10:52 AM

Gently rub with Saskatchewan seal skin. ("wink")
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#14 Murray

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 08:22 PM

All of my four Colts Thompsons were buried in an underground cache for about 20 years, (see Tracie Hills American Legend pages 63 and 64).
My guns are in that pile of Thompson shown on page 64, huh.gif
While one gun is in original condition, the other three had some rust spots. sad.gif
I have used a very fine slainless steel pot cleaner with 3 in 1 oil.
I find the stainless does not scratch the blued steel but tends to burnish it.
Like the guys posts above, the hardest part is making the decision to start. If possible, try on a patch that is not seen. Take the fore grip off and have a look at the underside of the fore grip support. You will often find rust on that ,apon which you can try cleaning with out damaging the appearance of the gun.
Best of luck rolleyes.gif
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#15 jim

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 01:17 AM

I think what I'm going to do is post some pictures of the gun for you guys to give me your opinions on whether or not it's rusted bad enough to take the chance on possibly ruining the entire finish.
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#16 full auto 45

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 06:56 AM

Philohio & Secomnd amend, your incorrect. You should use the oil from infant manatees, infants only as the adults you use the skin to sand with. Or use Snail Darter oil withspotted owl skin. You know they taste just like chicken.
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#17 SecondAmend

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 08:03 AM

Mike,

With all due respect, one fries baby manatee in snail darter oil. Spotted owl has a taste sort of between bald eagle and whooping crane, not at all like chicken.

To pay dues where due, the gag of "Saskatchewan seal skin" is from the 80's Showtime Canadian comedy series "Super Dave Osborn."
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#18 junkyard4$

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 10:10 AM

OK you guys I'm going to let you in on a little secret, WD-40 is mostly kerosene and some paraffin and the thought that anyone would use it on a gun of any value makes me shutter. My father and I have had plenty of experience reversing the mistakes of using WD-40 on a gun. The customer always says “but I put WD-40 on it”. It is good for loosening bolts but that’s about it, it will not give long term lubrication or rust protection. There is a product on the market that most people haven’t heard of yet for some reason. Gibbs Brand Lubricant is the best product we have found so far. We sprayed some junk shotgun barrels with Gibbs and left them outside for a few years and there is no rust at all. For rust spots I spray a little Gibbs on them once a day for a few days and the rust just falls off with no abrasives being used. Gibbs is also use by many law enforcement agencies across the country and we all know the amount of abuse and exposure to the weather law enforcement guns get. It is a little pricy but hey........you get what you pay for. Now for the shameless plug, I sell Gibbs so if anyone is interested in trying some go to this link http://www.gunbroker...p?Item=19820657

Thank You

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#19 Z3BigDaddy

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 11:58 AM

"but I put WD-40 on it". And what happened??? I have been using it for many years to no detriment to my guns, fishing equipment, door locks, and on and on.... Where did you find the formula of kerosene and wax? I agree it is petroleum based but kerosene?

While the ingredients in WD-40 are secret, we can tell you what WD-40 does NOT contain. WD-40 does not contain silicone, kerosene, water, wax, graphite, chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), or any known cancer-causing agents.

I don't mind you pitching you product, but don't do it by discrediting others with dubius facts....

BTW I have used WD40 on everything from Glenfield 22's to museum quality single action Colts with no fear, or negative results.
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#20 Norm

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 12:07 PM

The large machines I work on require lubrication quite often. We have been told to NEVER use WD40 as a lubricant.

We can use it to help break bound-up parts free, but must wash it away with acetone and then lubricate with oil or grease (whichever suits the need best.)

I have heard many guns owners say that they have had no problems with using WD40, and some that have told horror tales about it.

Maybe it just depends on the finsh and overall condition of the gun before using it?

Norm

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