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Rust "dots" On Colt 21/28


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#21 Z3BigDaddy

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 01:26 PM

"some that have told horror tales about it." What were these stories? "My father and I have had plenty of experience reversing the mistakes of using WD-40 on a gun." And what did you and your father have to reverse? I'm just a little confused as this is the first I have heard negative things about the product.

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#22 Sgt

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 03:01 PM

When I went though my concealed carry training, the Sgt. Maj. who taught the class recommended against WD40. He said it broke down the lubricants, and because of its penetrating properties was not good to have aroud ammo. In my opinion, it would still make a good cleaner.
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#23 Norm

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 03:07 PM

Z3,

I have no expierience with WD40 on guns, but I do on other machines.

I don't know how it would effect the asthetics of a gun (our machines are nasty from use.) I do know that if it is used as a lubricant and is allowed to set for a week or two, it pretty much evaporates. This leaves the item to be lubricated "dry." If you use it every other day on the item, it tends to work well.

The "horror tales" I had heard were on reveolvers and shotguns. People had used WD40 on them and let them sit for long periods of time. They say that the hinge points become very hard to open.

As I said, I never had any problem with it on a gun; because I have never used it on a gun.

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#24 Grey Crow

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 03:20 PM

For light rust I've always used 0000 steel wool and solvent.

I used Marksman's Choice w/ 0000 on the Worcester and got very good results. Light pressure!

For protection good old gun oil, nothing fancy. I keep an oil saturated shop cloth in an old peanut butter jar for wiping down the externals.
(by keeping the rag in a sealed container it prevents the fire hazard)

I have a Dan Wesson Pistol Pack that I purchased in 1976, it's stored in it's cary case of cloth coverd foam, the finish is new in condition. I annually take all my guns out and wipe them down and run a lightly oil coated patch through the bores.

If a product has worked for you and proven itself, stick with it.
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#25 junkyard4$

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 03:28 PM

I am not knocking it as a penetrate, it is good for taking rusted bolts out on old tractors, lawn mowers and whatever else. But now you guys are talking about using it on a $20,000 plus Colt Thompson. Our experience is people would put WD-40 on a gun just before they put it away thinking that it will protect it. What winds up happening is that the WD-40 will wash off any oil that was protecting the gun and then it starts rusting in the gun case. Or people will spray it in the internals thinking that it will lubricate the gun and the same thing happens. Spray some on a squeaky rusted gate hinge, it will stop squeaking but you can bet tomorrow it will start squeaking again. All I am saying is to use the right product for the job. I am not saying that WD-40 is a bad product, just not good for guns, keep it in the garage or shed.
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#26 Hurridale

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 06:16 PM

Junkyard and the other posters in this thread are right; WD40 is a SOLVENT, far more than a lubricant. The "WD" stands for "water displacement" (the "40" was from that it was the 40th formula the inventor tried). That's why it worked so well when you got water in the old distributor cap (back when cars had points).

It is a great product, but it is NOT a great lubricant, nor does it provide a protective cover on par with gun oils and greases designed to provide only that function.

It also works very well at stripping off protective cosmoline/oil from coated parts. Obviously, it if strips off protective coatings so well, it is not a good choice for gun finishes.

I use it, and I think it should be in everyone's toolbox. But like any tool, it needs to be used for what it is, and not for what it ain't.
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#27 Z3BigDaddy

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 09:50 PM

OK I guess it comes down to this... I know what my guns look like, if you want to peruse the contents of my safe have at it....

You all have stories about what "damage" others have had happen, which is worth, well, you know how much...... I'm not advocating it as a solution to long term storage, I've never said that... but I've never had probs with guns sitting for over a year at a time with no attention....

As for JunqueYard, you didn't tell the truth, or you didn't know the truth, bout WD40, why should I believe what you say about your own product? I'll stick with my Costco WD40, and you can use your 15 buck a can stuff.....

And I am still an advocate of using in combo with fine steel wool for rust spots... That was the thread topic BTW.....

Oh and Hurridale... Part of the problem is most people over lubricate their guns.... All you need is that microscopic layer... if she's dripping oil you've got her over lubed.......

Norm first you say it dries up and disappears then, People had used WD40 on them and let them sit for long periods of time. They say that the hinge points become very hard to open. How does that work when it is gone?


I would sit and argue more but unlike the Wendys guy I don't get paid.... Just trying to tell you what's works for me....
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#28 Norm

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 10:33 PM

Z3,

The WD40 seems to "wash out" any other lubricants (oil, grease, etc.) when used. After the WD40 "evaporates" there is nothing there and it is dry (unlubricated.)

If WD40 works for you, then by all means, keep using it.

Like I said earlier; I never used it on a gun. This is not because people warned me about it's "bad properties", but rather just by chance.


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#29 jim

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 11:03 PM

Okay, here's a picture of my Thompson, the one I'm considering different options on removing the light rust "dots".user posted image

I'll post more later.
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#30 jim

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 11:25 PM

here's another one.user posted image
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#31 jim

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 11:33 PM

user posted image
This one isn't close enough to show the dots, but it shows the overall condition.
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#32 Z3BigDaddy

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 11:41 PM

Oh man what a rusted piece of crap!!! I say get rid of it.... Let me put it in the safe with all my other neglected guns... PlueeeZe!!!


Really... It is a pretty nice looking Thompson... Nothing to be ashamed of there....

Blaine
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#33 Norm

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Posted 28 June 2004 - 09:34 AM

biggrin.gif Nice gun! biggrin.gif

I wouldn't do anything to it but shoot it!

Norm

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#34 catnipman

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Posted 28 June 2004 - 01:04 PM

Not that I'm suggesting this be done in this case, but check this post out regarding

Electrolytic Rust Removal
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#35 catnipman

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Posted 28 June 2004 - 01:39 PM

Here's some interesting information on chemical rust removal products:

Rust Treatment Comparisons

I found this cached by Google, with the original page gone, so the internal links don't work and the pics are missing, but the basic information is intact. I saved a copy to my own web site, since I presume the cached Google copy will disappear soon.
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#36 sten guy

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Posted 28 June 2004 - 02:00 PM

I personally wouldn't touch it. That gun is in much better shape than some I've seen.

STEN
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#37 Z3BigDaddy

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Posted 28 June 2004 - 02:08 PM

I think sten is right.... Just shooting it, cleaning it normally, and it will just kinda turn that into a nice patina that you will lose if you remove it.... And like he said it is a beautiful gun just the way it sits.....
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