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21, 27, & 28 Wood


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#1 Grey Crow

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Posted 25 June 2004 - 11:25 PM

With the early models of Colts, did the metal butt plate curve over onto the top of the stock, or was it a flat piece that just covered the end grain?

Any one have photos of early non-crossbolt wood / metal configurations?


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#2 gijive

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Posted 28 June 2004 - 12:23 PM

Grey Crow,

The 1921, 1927 and 1921/28 Colt model butt stocks are all identical. Remember, all 15,000 Colt guns were Model of 1921 when they came off the assembly line. The butt stocks were the same and the butt plate has the curved portion at the top which is held by a small screw in the top of the stock. The WWII 1928 Model butt stocks were all fashioned after the original Colt guns, so WWII 1928 butt stocks are also all the same, irrespective of whether or not the have the reinforcing cross bolt.

The exception to Colt butt stocks is when the 1928 Model was offered with a horizontal foregrip and sling swivels. The original butt stocks were inletted for a swivel and an Enfield type off-set swivel was attached. The base of the Enfield type swivel is smaller than the milled type commonly found on WWII Thompsons. The WWII milled swivels will not fit in the area inletted for the swivel on a genuine Colt 1928 Navy model butt stock. If someone tries to sell you an early Colt butt stock with a WWII variety milled swivel, chances are it is an early WWII butt stock being passed off as a Colt stock.

The M1 and M1A1 guns have flat butt plates without the curved portion you refer to, again irrespective of whether or not they have the reinforcing cross bolt. Early butt plates were milled, later ones were stamped.

The MGC Replica guns manufactured in the late 1960's and 1970's have 1928 style butt stocks without the curved portion at the top. So in that respect, they are not entirely accurate.
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#3 Grey Crow

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Posted 28 June 2004 - 04:08 PM

Thank You very much gijive!

The info you provided really helps. Also you saved me some green....
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