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Purchased 1928a1. Need To Restore It


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#1 Floridac3

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Posted 05 July 2004 - 10:25 PM

Last week I bought the 1928a1 that had been listed on Gunbroker for a while (I noticed others here talking about it).. The price was just right, so I couldn't pass on it. The finish looks horrendous though. What are my options for refinishing it? Anyone out there do really good Thompson work?

Thanks


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#2 Randy Lish

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Posted 05 July 2004 - 11:40 PM

I could not think of anyone else to send you to other than P.K. in Colorado. If you look at a previous post entitled: " P.k.'s Metal And Dan's Woodworking " you'll see what I mean.
Best Regards

Randy
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#3 Sgt

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Posted 05 July 2004 - 11:46 PM

Was this the 28 that was badly pitted, that some of us were commenting about?
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#4 colt21a

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Posted 05 July 2004 - 11:57 PM

if it is the one i am thinking of,a full restoration is in order.

as i am sure there is no documented battle history story to go with it.as some colts have this history but very few,it is even harder to document the militaries do to the mass amounts made,and those who used them have passed,and never wrote down number's and info......

or what serial number they had............remember this is just my opinion.but i have done enough research on it myself with first hand acct's,to be able to make that statement.............your mileage may vary..........

glad however that you bought something.now remember you are in the klub..........and all thompson owners deserve respect.no matter what they own.........wink!!

you deserve it now...............good luck in the restoration quest!!!

take care,ron
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#5 SecondAmend

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 06:27 AM

Congratulations!

We (well, some anyway) may have entered negative assessments of the gun, but, hey, it's a Thompson and there're ain't too many of 'em!

If it's the gun I'm thinking of, looked like the best bet was to get a complete '28 parts set from I.M.A. or other supplier to replace everything that goes in or on the receiver, see what/how much can be done to revamp the surface of the receiver, and enjoy!

I would not shoot the gun as is. Rust pits and dendrils may have weakened components, especially the barrell.

Some before, during and after photos may be interesting.

Good luck!
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#6 Brickyard

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 08:53 AM

1) Take pics and send to PK.
2) Call and discuss with same.
3) Package gun and parts available and send to same.
4) Evaluate options as discussed and agree on course of action.
5) Relax, be as patient as possible.
6) Work with the man. Trust me, he understands where you're trying to go.
7) Receive gun and ENJOY.

Sound simple?

It is.

I speak from multiple experiences.

Congrats on the new pup!

CJR
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#7 Hawkeye_Joe

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 09:37 AM

I think this is the one we are all talking about.. if these don't show up let me know and I'll host them on a format that will show.

user posted image

user posted image


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#8 Norm

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 10:10 AM

Hell, oil it up and shoot it!

It all looks the same in the muzzle flash! biggrin.gif

I would check the history before doing anything to it.

Norm
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#9 Arthur Fliegenheimer

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 10:46 AM

Norm,
Unless Floridac3 got the gun from the WWII vet, how would he ever check the history on the gun? The only thing a pitted and rusted gun is going to do is get worse. You couldn't possibly hurt this TSMG's value, historical or otherwise, with a make-over, especially since somebody has already attempted swapping out original components to begin with.

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#10 Floridac3

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 10:49 AM

Thanks for the help everyone.. I think I will look into having it cleaned up as recommended. The pictures above are indeed the gun. I was going to post them myself but was beaten to it..

I figured it was prob the last time I'd see a 1928 at such a price, and could always replace parts or restore at my leasure. Less out of pocket right now... and we all know the guns aren't getting any cheaper..

I will definitely post pics of the gun when it is restored. In the mean time, I think I've found a group of very informed collectors here. I'l prob be picking your brains again if you'd so allow me..


Thanks again!

Bill (FC3)


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#11 Hawkeye_Joe

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 11:50 AM

Bill, You mentioned a couple of times that you think you got a good deal on it. I put an offer in on it as well and wondered what you got it for. If you would be so kind as to let me know I would appreciate it. You can e-mail it to me if you don't want to post it in the open forum.
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#12 Balder

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 12:22 PM

QUOTE (Norm @ Jul 6 2004, 10:10 AM)
Hell, oil it up and shoot it!


I totally agree with Norm, the wear is part of the gun's history. Save the money, spend it on ammo in stead. Congrats on your gun - enjoy it!

Regards,

Balder
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#13 Arthur Fliegenheimer

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 12:41 PM

Balder,
I guess you mean neglect is of historical value? The worst of the pitting could easily have happned long after WWII, so I am not sure what would be sacrificed from a restoration. If original WWII lead fouling in the breach, barrel, muzzle and bolt is also a part of historical significance, then I guess cleaning the weapon after shooting would also compromise the history? Come on.

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#14 Balder

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 12:59 PM

Arthur,

If you, as a gun collector, were given the choice between a 100% original 1710 Brown Bess rifle with 60% finish and the same rifle with a 100% refinish - which would you choose?

Balder
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#15 Arthur Fliegenheimer

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 01:28 PM

Balder,
I hardly see the connection between an 18th century musket, whose wear would indeed reflect it's period usage, and a 60+ year-old TSMG, whose condition, in all likelihood, has nothing to do with its war time service, if it ever even went overseas. Sometimes we get too caught up in the "Antique Road Show" silliness concerning "original" finish. In some cases the best way to preserve the entire item is to refinish it rather than to continue to let the ravages of time and neglect further erode what remains. We are not talking about aged patina here, (although even the preservation of patina seems bazaar at times) but rather corrosive elements that don't heighten the "collectability" of the item, but rather threaten its integrity and shooting safety.

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#16 Norm

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 01:29 PM

QUOTE
Norm,
Unless Floridac3 got the gun from the WWII vet, how would he ever check the history on the gun? The only thing a pitted and rusted gun is going to do is get worse. You couldn't possibly hurt this TSMG's value, historical or otherwise, with a make-over, especially since somebody has already attempted swapping out original components to begin with.




All I'm saying is enjoy the gun.

If you want to refinish, go ahead. If not, that is fine also. Just enjoy what you have!

Besides, a WW2 vet could tell a lie about gun just as quickly as the rest of us.

Norm
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#17 Balder

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 02:37 PM

Arthur,

I asked you a question, I did not see a reply in your most recent posting.

Balder
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#18 Hawkeye_Joe

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 02:43 PM

For fear of being labeled the smartest guy on the planet again.. *LOL* I'll post about this anyway .. laugh.gif

QUOTE
If you, as a gun collector, were given the choice between a 100% original 1710 Brown Bess rifle with 60% finish and the same rifle with a 100% refinish - which would you choose?



Long Land Pattern Service Muskets, (they weren't called Brown Bess' til 1785 in print) were first manufactured in 1728....and they were muskets, smoothbored as a shotgun, not rifles..

And I know you were just making a point.. I just had to show off my big brains again.. *L* Oh and if it, the Bess,was in 60% shape.. I'd keep it that way. But I think I'd refinish that 1928a1... rolleyes.gif
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#19 The1930sRust

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 03:21 PM

WOW! Nice gun.

WOW! Just about a record. You guys got in 11 or so on-topic posts before the whole thing went south with bickering and arguing. Can you please start a new post when you get in a tiff, and try and keep the posts on topic? This is the third time recently I've seen this happen, and the result always degenerates, you degenerates! Thanks.

We now return you to your regularly scheduled post about FloridaC3's new toy......

Florida: CJ speaks volumes earlier. I saw his gun (correct me if I am wrong) that had been in a lagoon (or some such place), with some pitting. And had been a reweld. PK really did a number on it...
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#20 Arthur Fliegenheimer

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Posted 06 July 2004 - 03:33 PM

Hawkeye,
In the response to Balder's post, I referred to the "BB" as a musket. But superfluous information is always welcome.

Balder.
Yes, I would prefer a 60% conditioned "BB" over a refinished one. However, my interest in a "BB" would be for its 280 year-old charm, not as a firearm to go plinking with. But if that "BB" was below 35% condition, a refinishing might be the only way one could possibly appreciate the weapon at all. Just imagine, artisans have recently repainted the Sistine Chapel since Michelangelo's brush caressed the ceiling. The Statue Of Liberty has also had a makeover, as have countless other antiquities and historical objects.

Chris,
The topic never drifted away from the original point which was whether it was best to refinish the TSMG. If we make argument and polemics persona non -grata in a thread, then these posts will have all the flavor of Aunt Bea's pickles
.

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