Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

New Thoughts On Compensator Fouling?


  • Please log in to reply
29 replies to this topic

#21 SecondAmend

SecondAmend

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 610 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 15 July 2004 - 07:00 AM

For light to moderate comp fouling I've had fair results with either Wipe-Out foam reapplied several times over a couples days or by putting a small chunk of rag in the comp and soaking it in M-Pro-7 or Wipe-Out for a couple of days. I'm sure other non-acid, non-mercury based fouling removers work about as well which is to say, not real well but they do seem to ease the "matrix" up a bit. Heavy fouling generated by letting a guy shoot a couple hundred of his fairly hot hand load lead IDPA loads required scraping. Never again!

Only real cure - 21A, M1, or M1A1, that is, barrel without a comp.

As to the question - does a Cutts compensator "work" - sounds like they generate a lot of "work" getting the fouling cleaned out. Does the Cutts compensator provide a cost effective aid for a soldier to control the recommended firing of a Thompson at approved rates of fire? The Army said "No" and deleted them. Key term is "cost effective." Laws of physics will tell you the comp does something - the question is whether the results are worth the cost.

Rock on! Rat-tat-tat!


  • 0

#22 21 smoker

21 smoker

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Board Benefactor
  • 1333 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:West coast ,FL
  • Interests:collecting nfa, old cars, huntin` n fishin`, reloading ammo

    NRA CERTIFIED INSTRUCTOR
    MVPA RESTORATION MEMBER
    MARINE CORP LEAGUE PISTOL TEAM MEMBER

Posted 15 July 2004 - 07:02 AM

I know the initial price can be steep for an ultrasonic cleaner,...but so is our investments in NFA....maybe you can buddy up with some friends and pool your money...I did and everyone is happy with the results....let me clarify one point...the ultrasomic cleaning process does not remove lead completely,but loosens it`s grip,softens the bond it has...you will have to pick and scrape initially,especially the first time... but it sure makes it easier...and each time out it gets easier,til your time cleaning is very short...I`m still learning about it...BTW..surplus units are available...I have delt with Bob Bowman at Tankrides.com and was very satisfied...and L&R solutions...good guys to deal with...my .02, wink.gif
  • 0

#23 Kevin

Kevin

    Regular Member

  • Regular Group
  • 257 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:western, TN
  • Interests:Airplanes
    Guns
    Hot Rods

Posted 15 July 2004 - 07:07 PM

I've been using the stuff sold by Dillon. Squirt some on before you start and every time you come back from the line. ( you do dump 100+ rounds every time you go to the line -right? laugh.gif ). works fine I don't have to clean the comp now.
Kevin
  • 0

#24 OldFalGuy

OldFalGuy

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 700 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Central Texas
  • Interests:Sporting Clays, Skeet, Reloading and just plain Living

Posted 15 July 2004 - 11:35 PM

Ultra sonic is nice but pretty expensive but in relative terms they save a lot of time and wear and tear on pretty darn high dollar guns I think we would all agree. I bought a used one which is about 10 x 6 x 5 for $450 and I thought that was a bunch but I can drop the whole grip stick or the breach end of a barrel and abolt off an MG 42 in it with Simple green and 80% of the work is done. I imagine there are a whole lot better cleaners and I would like to hear what someone really likes to use. DOn't know what the answer is ont he comp but for me it will be to shoot it and squirt it with a solvent and keep shooting. Be nice to be able to remove it easily and I don't know how easy it really is as I don't have the Thompson here yet to tell- any thoughts.

Mark
  • 0

#25 prairiefire

prairiefire

    New Member

  • Regular Group
  • 16 posts

Posted 19 July 2004 - 12:34 PM

good lord! you guys think you got problems with lead build-up in the comp after shooting FMJ? I shoot hard-cast lead round nose 230 grainers 99% of the time ( 100-200 Rds / weekend) since FMJ is so darn expensive in my neck of the woods ( 5x more! ). Guys, you should see the layer of lead i have to deal with come clean-up time. The word "chunks of lead" describe it completely! They are a true cast-iron (or is it cast-lead) bitch to remove. Have tried chemicals, to know avail. oh well, elbow grease, mallets and small chisels always work, if a bit primitive. laugh.gif
  • 0

#26 Matt in Pdx

Matt in Pdx

    Long Time Member

  • Regular Group
  • 57 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 19 July 2004 - 08:31 PM

Has anyone pulled factory fmj bullets to see which ones do not have lead expopsed at the base?
  • 0

#27 SecondAmend

SecondAmend

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 610 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 20 July 2004 - 11:51 AM

Matt,

I'm not sure about other brands, but Federal markets the .45s without exposed lead at the base as "TMJ" - total metal jacket. The price is about the same as FMJs but they can be hard to find. I use the TMJ .45s in the L drum under the assumption that a drum dump is the worst case scenario for comp fouling.


  • 0

#28 Chip

Chip

    Long Time Member

  • Board Donor
  • 63 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 20 July 2004 - 01:47 PM

I have always used "Break Free" CLP on my guns and have not had any trouble with the compensator leading up. This weekend we ran several C and L drums through it and all that built up was some carbon which wiped away with a lubricated rag. The bullets fired were both the totally enclosed and TMJ with exposed lead base.


  • 0

#29 Gunner

Gunner

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Board Donor
  • 282 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 20 July 2004 - 05:15 PM

This weekend I was at Bass Pro, and looked at an electrical rig made by Outers. It was about $75, which would be a bargain if it worked. It seemed cumbersome. You set the barrel up vertically, plug it at the chamber end, tape up the compensator slots, insert a metal rod, and pour in solution. There is an voltage converter and wire that clips to the receiver, and you flip an switch, and the metal is supposed to accumulate on the rod. Anybody have any experience with this setup?
  • 0

#30 SecondAmend

SecondAmend

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 610 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 21 July 2004 - 06:41 AM

Gunner,

I'd want a full satisfaction or my money back guarantee before I bought it. I'd also want a clause to indemnify me for any actual and consequential damages.

Then I'd try it on something that did not matter. Sounds like the machine is sort of trying to reverse (inverse?) plate by getting the residue to separate from rather than bond to the underlying metal (the comp). I'd be concerned about bluing being damaged and generating pits in the comp metal.

  • 0