Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

The Ambidextrous Thompson


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Roland, Headless Thompson Gunner

Roland, Headless Thompson Gunner

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Board Benefactor
  • 683 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Maryland
  • Interests:Thompsons, Garands, All things WW2, Corsairs, Classic Guitars, Sex, Guns and Rock & Roll

Posted 19 July 2004 - 07:16 AM

At a gun show in May I saw what I recall being an M1A1 with the receiver cut on the left and right sides for the charging handle. I asked one of the board's resident experts about it and he thought someone must have customized it and that it might not be safe to fire. I just opened my newly acquired copy of Tracie Hill's book and see that there was indeed a short lived ambidextrous M1 made.

Any idea how many were made and may exist now?i Anyone have one of these?
  • 0

#2 Roland, Headless Thompson Gunner

Roland, Headless Thompson Gunner

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Board Benefactor
  • 683 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Maryland
  • Interests:Thompsons, Garands, All things WW2, Corsairs, Classic Guitars, Sex, Guns and Rock & Roll

Posted 19 July 2004 - 08:48 PM

Nobody have any info on these?
  • 0

#3 John Jr

John Jr

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 1956 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Mena, Arkansas, USA
  • Interests:Plenty

Posted 19 July 2004 - 09:14 PM

Not I said the rat.


  • 0

#4 TD.

TD.

    Respected Member

  • Board Benefactor
  • 2911 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 20 July 2004 - 08:10 AM

Hi Roland,
The only two references I can think of right now dealing with the Ambidextrous M1 Thompson are cited in two of Tracie Hill’s books. The first is on Page 67 of the Bannan and Hill book, Notes on Auto-Ordnance, 2nd Edition. The picture credit is cited as the William Douglas Military Museum. I would guess this same Thompson is again pictured on Page 231 of Tracie’s current book, Thompson: The American Legend. The author of this section is William B. Douglas. It appears only one (a guess on my part) Thompson was modified in this manner - an early M1 Thompson, Serial Number 307. That’s all the information I have. I suggest contacting Bill Douglas for additional information on this Thompson variation.


  • 0

#5 giantpanda4

giantpanda4

    Respected Member

  • Board Benefactor
  • 2086 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Howell, MI 48855
  • Interests:Mechanical toys - cars, instruments, and of course - guns. The 1921-28 thompsons are the epitomy of perfection for a mechanical device that fills all my interests!

Posted 20 July 2004 - 11:22 AM

Roland,

I am curious as to what you saw. Did you get contact info so you can see that thing again? If so, could you get a picture so we can compare it to Tracie's photos?

There were a lot of strange things done to recievers - apparently, the question is who did the work.

Though I do not see a problem with the cocking lever on the right - but I shoot left handed!! laugh.gif My advice to anyone who complains about it is to buy a 1928!
  • 0

#6 Roland, Headless Thompson Gunner

Roland, Headless Thompson Gunner

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Board Benefactor
  • 683 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Maryland
  • Interests:Thompsons, Garands, All things WW2, Corsairs, Classic Guitars, Sex, Guns and Rock & Roll

Posted 20 July 2004 - 12:47 PM

Unfortunately I am a wealth of non-information. This was my first visit to an out of state show and I was more intrigued with the 28 overstamp which was the first I'd seen. My buddy tells me that table is always there and always has Thompsons thought they did seem to interested in showing them. They show will cycle around again in a couple of weeks and I plan to head back. The receiver definitely had the slot cut on the left side but the actuator was still mounted on the right.
  • 0