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Inherited A Replica Gun, Questions....


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#1 DSkeet325i

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Posted 26 September 2004 - 09:45 PM

I have looked in the FAQ section but do not see anything that applies to me...My uncle died back in 1992 and had a big gun collection. My aunt gave my dad and I a couple of his guns and just recently she gave me his "Thompson replica"... I don't know alot about these guns and am interested in them. This gun says on the outside that it was made by Apache Arms in Tempe Arizona. I did some searching and came up empty handed. The gun also does not have the handle under the barrel of the gun, but has a slotted wood stock up front with a metal handle in the rear with what looks to be a flash supressor at the end of the barrell. Has a regular clip(20 rounds?) Thanks for any help and I will try to get some pics up when i go to my dads house.(leaving gun there until I move out of this house) Thanks again!

David
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#2 John Jr

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Posted 26 September 2004 - 10:25 PM

Sounds like a knock off? Can you post pics?


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#3 Sgt

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Posted 27 September 2004 - 05:59 AM

DSkeet--
I collect replica and dummy guns, but don't ever recall seeing that company as a maker. Does it shoot anything like blowback blanks or is it a semi? For replicas, most of what we see are the MGC Japanese Thompsons or original partskit with solid steel receiver. If yours is a partskit or high quality duplication, parts should be interchangeable. You should be able to switch the horizontal grip for vertical one and also install a drum, if you wanted. Does your gun disassemble? I'll bet if you post pictures someone will recognize it.
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#4 Bill in VA

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Posted 27 September 2004 - 06:35 AM

IIRC, the Apaches (at the ones I'm thinking of) were twins to the Spitfire carbines.
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#5 Norm

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Posted 27 September 2004 - 06:59 AM

Does this gun fire from an open bolt?

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#6 Tman

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Posted 27 September 2004 - 04:37 PM

Apache Arms of Tempe Arizona manufactured a .45 caliber semi auto rifle around 1968. Externally, it resembles the Spitfire or Volunteer series weapons of the same caliber. The Spitfire and Volunteer models used a tubular receiver, the Apache used a square type, closer resembling the Thompson. It also has a cast alloy muzzle attachment designed to give the appearance of a compensator but it has no operational merit. Internally, it differs radically from the Spitfire and Volunteer. It had a barrel length of 16.5" and an overall length of 37.5" and used a M3 30 round mag. Apache Arms later changed their name to Bowers Industries and moved to Mesa Arizona.

Hope this sheds some light on your firearm.
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#7 DSkeet

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Posted 13 February 2005 - 10:22 PM

QUOTE (Tman @ Sep 27 2004, 04:37 PM)
Apache Arms of Tempe Arizona manufactured a .45 caliber semi auto rifle around 1968. Externally, it resembles the Spitfire or Volunteer series weapons of the same caliber. The Spitfire and Volunteer models used a tubular receiver, the Apache used a square type, closer resembling the Thompson. It also has a cast alloy muzzle attachment designed to give the appearance of a compensator but it has no operational merit. Internally, it differs radically from the Spitfire and Volunteer. It had a barrel length of 16.5" and an overall length of 37.5" and used a M3 30 round mag. Apache Arms later changed their name to Bowers Industries and moved to Mesa Arizona.

Hope this sheds some light on your firearm.

Thanks for the replies, I had forgotten that I posted this message. This describes my gun well, do you think this gun would be worth spending the money to restore it? The wood is in fairly decent shape but the metal has seen better days. I shot it for the 2nd time today and a couple times it seemed to slip 3-4 rounds automatically under one trigger pull rather than the rest of the trigger pulls when it was just one round per pull. Maybe something is worn over the years? What are the estimated costs of having the gun re-blued and the wood refinished? Thanks alot for the help!

David
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#8 Ron A

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Posted 14 February 2005 - 02:40 AM

If this gun is fireing more than one round per trigger pull you got a problem.

In some circles this gun could be described as a "machinegun" - I would get a gunsmith to look at this right a way...

I am not sure that I would spend the money to blue this gun as the last one of this type I had only sold for $175.00 these are not collector items at this time or in the future.

In the present defective condition you could get in trouble......
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#9 Tman

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Posted 14 February 2005 - 10:44 AM

If I were in your position, I would get rid of it. If it has too much sentimental value, take it to a good gunsmith and get it fixed. The gun would be considered contraband in its present state and is subject to seizure.

Wood refinishing should not be too difficult. A light sanding and coats of linseed oil should bring it back. Most of the guns I have seen like this had a rough coating resembling the stuff the Brits use on their subguns. Enamel over phosphate, I think.
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#10 DSkeet

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Posted 14 February 2005 - 01:37 PM

I am taking the gun to a local gunsmith next week, going to see if he can fix it. I don't like the idea of the firing more than one round in one pull. It only did 3-4 rounds on 2 occasions but more firing could make it get worse and I don't want to get in any kind of trouble. Thanks for the help!
I will try to get some pics of this thing up soon.
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