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Resurfacing Serial Numbers


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#1 Ron A

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Posted 07 October 2004 - 01:20 AM

Does anyone have any experence in resurfacing serial numbers? I have a C drum which has had the numbers ground off. Would it be a good idea to try to resurface the numbers - or does it thin the plate. Does the acid eat the metal and make it thinner?
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#2 Mike Hammer

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Posted 07 October 2004 - 02:22 AM

Ron: It's highly unlikley that you would ever make the ground off numbers reappear by the use of acid on the thin metal of the drum. You will only eat away more of the metal that is already too thin in that area. Be happy with the "mystery" of owning a relic of bygone days, no doubt there is a story behind that drum! wink.gif

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#3 giantpanda4

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Posted 07 October 2004 - 06:23 AM

I work with a metallurgist who has done this on tools that were stolen and numbers ground off. My recollection was that he able to see below the numbers where the grains had been disturbed - and you could read the numbers quite well. This was on a tool that had some thickness (1/4" in). I do not know if he has done sheet metal yet. I do not believe that the acid etching will cause much more damage. If I can get pictures, I will have them posted.

I am torn about whether you should do this. The ground number does add a bit of history/mystery to the drum. Drum numbers were not matched to the gun numbers. Why do you want to know? Just curious....
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#4 Ron A

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Posted 07 October 2004 - 09:13 AM

I guess the only reason is I am curious as to what the number were. I have been advised by some that the acid will eat the metal others have told me the number will show for a very short time then disapear so as not to eat the metal away. I would like to hear from someone who had done this procedure.
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#5 normandy123

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Posted 07 October 2004 - 10:35 PM

maybe, just maybe, you can make friends with the state crime lab guy and he will bring it up for you...they told me it doesn't have much depth, so it is not like chemical engraving or etiching just a color change and that it just emphasizes the disturbed metal molecules under the grinding...hope this helps...
remember if it shows up as a mismatch number, the unit might be worth less $ than the mystery of the ground off number or numbers it carries with it ...
my 2-cents
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#6 John Jr

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Posted 07 October 2004 - 11:20 PM

You steal that one out of Chicago?

laugh.gif
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#7 Ron A

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Posted 08 October 2004 - 12:36 AM

Its my understanding it came from Nevada
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#8 giantpanda4

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Posted 08 October 2004 - 06:27 AM

Ron,
My metalurgist coworker suggested to me that you use a 2% solution of Nitric Acid in Methanol. Brush this on the area were the stamping was, and the work hardened area under the stamps should darken. When you get enough to read the number, wash with pure methanol or put some other neutralizer on it. He suggested methanol instead of water so you minimize the corrosion. Make sure to oil it after you neutralize it as well. No pics are available of when he has done this in the past, but I have seen them. It does work well. But the further ground below the stampings the harder it will be to get a good result. Hopefully it is not ground too deeply!
Good luck - post pics if you get r done!
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#9 colt21a

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Posted 08 October 2004 - 01:07 PM

i have the krystal ball here:the number is #1037 wink!!

no muss no fuss...sold in neveda from one of the gun's from the collection of lester gillis or better known as {baby farce nelson} ooop's!!!> FACE<

and yes baby was from chicago!! take care,ron


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