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Question On Firing My West Hurley Thompson


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#1 TD.

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 07:21 AM

I finally got the opportunity yesterday to fire my "new" West Hurley Thompson. As everyone knows, it was a fantastic feeling. I loaded up and decided to shoot few shots on single to get used to the gun. I pulled the trigger and promptly fired a short burst. Another pull of the trigger and another short burst. Single did not work - full auto only - not that that is necessarily a bad thing biggrin.gif I later read in one of my Army manuals that the rocker is assembled incorrectly in the lower frame when semi does not function and the gun shoots full auto only or that the rocker may be worn out and need replacing.

This is a first for me but I believe I have heard of it before. Has anyone ever had this happen or heard of this happening? Is the rocker the only thing I may have a problem with. Any comments would be appreciated.
Thanks,

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#2 PK.

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 08:27 AM

Check your rocker for proper installation and wear, however WH guns often exhibit this problem due to tolerance deficiencies between the bolt/ receiver/ frame assembly. It can be corrected, usually in hand with a refurbish of the gun.
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#3 TD.

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 06:53 PM

PK.
I want you to know that when I bought this gun your account receivables increased in value biggrin.gif However, I am going to play with it and enjoy owning it for awhile before I turn it over to a Master. I plan on checking the assembly of the rocker and perhaps even replacing the rocker one evening in the dead of winter when I can't play outside games anymore (you may get the lower frame in box full of pieces one day if I cannot get it back together; I suspect that has happened a few times in your career). One additional question for me and everyone else that may have the same problem with their West Hurley: Is there any danger of hurting the weapon if I continue to fire it as is?
Thanks for all your posts and advice.
TD.

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#4 PK.

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Posted 25 October 2004 - 07:53 PM

There is no danger of damage from the problem you discuss, however there are often snakes lying in the grass in WH 28 guns. One of the most sinister is the position and shape of the locking slots in the receiver- they are often to far back and of the wrong shape to retard the bolt to the degree desired in order to lessen the impact on the rear of the receiver. This is normally not a problem in the short run, but can become one if you plan to use your gun for many years, or much shooting.

Thanks to you and every one who asks good questions and keeps this board alive.

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#5 PK.

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Posted 26 October 2004 - 05:14 PM

Before all you WH owners have a heart attack, I guess I should have mentioned that I repair this problem in the course of a full refurbish, restoring the design parameters and preventing future damage.

Sorry for the oversight.

CNC= same mistake many times. It’s all in the programmer/ operator. Same for manual machines (just no programmer :-)

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#6 Jay Baker

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Posted 26 October 2004 - 05:36 PM

Damn, I just sold it.
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#7 John Jr

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Posted 26 October 2004 - 08:42 PM

TD, I had the same problem, another guy on here is complaining of an M1 doing this or something similar, and another guy I know had this issue.

I defeated mine by replacing all the guts in the lower (or most of them) with Sarco replacement parts, but I think it was the disconnector in mine. My friend had to replace the sear and it fixed his. I would try that first.

Good luck.


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#8 TD.

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Posted 27 October 2004 - 06:38 AM

Thanks everyone, I appreciate the advice. This is one thing that makes this board so great. I checked on the rocker and it appears to be installed correctly. However, I did note some wear on this part so I plan on replacing the rocker first. If that doesn’t work, I will probably go further and replace all the internal parts in the lower.

A couple of additional questions for PK. – You mentioned one of the potential problems with WH’s is “the position and shape of the locking slots in the receiver- they are often to far back and of the wrong shape to retard the bolt to the degree desired in order to lessen the impact on the rear of the receiver.”

1. Is there some type of test and/or specific poor operating problems or anyway for us WH owners to tell if we have a problem gun?

2. What do you charge to perform a “full refurbish” on a Model of 1928 WH, including the repair of this problem?

Thanks PK. Thanks again everyone.

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#9 PK.

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Posted 27 October 2004 - 09:08 AM

1- The only way to really know the position of the locking slots is to measure them using gages designed for the purpose. Most all WH ’28 guns suffer from this malady, but to differing extremes. A decision to repair this problem must be made in conjunction with the second issue; shape.

2- The shape of the locking slot is supposed to be a straight plane on 45 degree angle running out into the shelf that allows the ‘ears’ of the lock to move to the rear. Most WH guns have the corner at the intersection machined away at about 22.5 degrees and about ½ the length of the plane.

Often, the slots are not aligned with the centerline of the receiver, twisting the lock when the gun tries to open.

The combination of 1 & 2 above is poison. The last guns made (the 22 caliber serial numbered 45’s) don’t seem to have the 2ed problem, and if the position is not to far off, may be alright as is.

This is not the only issue addressed in a refurbish, but one of the major ones. While each gun is different, the average price for a complete refurbish of a WH 28 is about $1600 currently; the gun will look and function as good any Thompson once completed, and the repairs are good for life.

Let me add a test you can perform to determine the relative position of your locking slots: Remove the receiver from the frame and remove the pilot and recoil spring. If you can, place the receiver upside down in a vise with the bolt, lock and actuator in place. If you don’t have a vise, lay it on a table or bench with the actuator knob between two phone books or such and have a friend hold the receiver assy. Using a screwdriver or some other tool to engage the sear notch with one hand so you can push the bolt rearward, place a finger of the other hand on the back of the actuator pushing forward. In essence, your hands will be opposing each other to keep the bolt and actuator pushed together tightly, while in the fully forward position. While maintaining this opposing force, allow the entire assy to move rearward until the ears of the lock engage the locking slot in the receiver. The gap between the front of the bolt and the receiver wall that stops its forward motion should not be more that the thickness of a dime.

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#10 TD.

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Posted 27 October 2004 - 10:20 PM

PK.,
Thank-you again for the additional information. I am sure it is appreciated by all. Now, where is a dime when you need one.........

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#11 Kevin

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Posted 30 October 2004 - 12:56 PM

PK, depending on how I hold my tongue. I can get a dime - or almost a nickel ( or is that $1600 dry.gif ) to fit in the gap. Other than that my WH runs fine. How big a problem do I have?
Kevin
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