Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Dumb Question About Oiler


  • Please log in to reply
18 replies to this topic

#1 gspc32

gspc32

    Long Time Member

  • Regular Group
  • 15 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 29 December 2004 - 04:51 PM

How does the oiler go into the receiver? When assembled, is the long arm of the oiler at the top of the gun? I know it's dumb but I can't find a definitive answer in my references.
  • 0

#2 Pop-pa

Pop-pa

    New Member

  • Regular Group
  • 2 posts

Posted 29 December 2004 - 05:01 PM

The oiler goes on the sides of the upper reciever, I put mine in 1st then the recoil spring and then the guide.
  • 0

#3 Kevin

Kevin

    Regular Member

  • Regular Group
  • 257 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:western, TN
  • Interests:Airplanes
    Guns
    Hot Rods

Posted 29 December 2004 - 06:24 PM

Long arm at the top. Put it in first, then the bolt.
Kevin
  • 0

#4 SecondAmend

SecondAmend

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 610 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 29 December 2004 - 07:43 PM

Not a dumb question at all.

Ya buy at '28 West Hurley w/o oiler and want to put one in - how does it go in?

Logical question if you've not seen one.
  • 0

#5 OldFalGuy

OldFalGuy

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 700 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Central Texas
  • Interests:Sporting Clays, Skeet, Reloading and just plain Living

Posted 30 December 2004 - 09:28 PM

I am going to be installing one also and from this thread I sure as heck can't tell what goes where when, up down, side, bolt first before the spring and guide???? With the bolt removed what goes in first,second, third and so forth??? Felt on the sides, right?
clueless WH owner

Mark
  • 0

#6 john

john

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 551 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Saint Paul, Minnesota

Posted 30 December 2004 - 10:45 PM

Look at the notch in the felt on one side.....The felt tip is cut parallel to the steel part of the oiler and angles to a point. This angled edge goes up (relatively, as you are holding the Upper receiver "upside down").
The angle of the felt at the end of this notch matches the angle of the slots cut in the receiver for the Blish lock. If you put it in backwards (upside down) the tip of the felt will contact the Blish lock tabs as the bolt comes rearward, and the oiler won't last long.

Just look at the relative angle and you'll see what I mean wink.gif

I've never put one in upside down but I'd guess it would bind on the Blish lock tab???

Hope this helps.

john
  • 0

#7 DC Chris

DC Chris

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 408 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Columbia, MD

Posted 31 December 2004 - 03:53 AM

I just did this to my WH 28.

The bolt action is much more quiet with the oiler installed. I purchased the 5-1 Thompson reprint service manual from WWII that had the picture in it. It is probably worth picking up to add to your library.

All in all, a good and fair question... I had to look at the book just to make sure too! It snapped right in like a glove with the long arms towards the top of the receiver (short arms closest to you with the receiver upside down). I purchased a GI internals kit from IMA for Christmas. All savage and contained a blish lock, actuator, recoil spring, buffer, fiber disk, bolt (complete with extractor, hammer, firing pin, spring, etc) and the felt oiler. All parts (sans oiler but it is WWII surplus) are marked S.

So to summarize:

1) It should be installed in a completely stripped receiver first
2) Long arms towards the top of the receiver (closest to the hole for the actuator)
3) The short side (back, if you will) of the oiler should fit perfectly over the buffer hole in the rear of the reciever. When reassembling, the buffer pilot that sticks out of the end of the receiver should slip right through the center "rear" hole of the oiler.
4) The oiler shouldn't need to be removed for a regular take down and cleaning. Just make sure it is well saturated with good oil after every take down. Remember what PK says .... Thompsons like to run wet!
5) I have heard that the "new production" oilers are not worth it. I forget what vendors were selling them (Sarco?) but the scuttle was that they were not worth it and didn't fit right. They were around 20 or 30 bucks but I would *highly* suggest you get a WWII oiler versus fooling with an inferior product.

Good luck and welcome to the boards. This is the best Thompson community on the internet, so feel free to ask any questions you may have.

Chris.
  • 0

#8 OldFalGuy

OldFalGuy

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 700 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Central Texas
  • Interests:Sporting Clays, Skeet, Reloading and just plain Living

Posted 31 December 2004 - 12:47 PM

Thanks Chris- I think the way you laid it out will help lots of folks.

Let me ask the collective here about the oiler bottle -
I have one but not the WH in front of me.
Does the bottle just sit in the buttstock to be removed to apply oil tot he various parts or does it somehow drip oil through the buttstock into the receiver/felt oiler to continuosly lube the bolt?
I doubt the latter but given its squarish shape I thought it odd for a removable oil bottle.

Mark
  • 0

#9 Zamm

Zamm

    Respected Member & Artist

  • Regular Group
  • 831 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Long Island, New York
  • Interests:Thompsons, and all their goodies!<br>Obsolete Victorian Photomechanical processes,<br>Etching, Engraving and all Printmaking,<br>Entomology, specializing in Coleoptera,<br>Arachnology, specializing in Theraphosidae.

Posted 31 December 2004 - 12:53 PM

Mark,
The bottle is just stored in the buttstock.
You remove and oil by hand.
The design is just one of the elegant touches of
a lost era...
Zamm
  • 0

#10 DC Chris

DC Chris

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 408 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Columbia, MD

Posted 31 December 2004 - 02:05 PM

Mark-

Yes, there are really two oilers - the internal oiler I was speaking above and the external "buttstock" oiler that is held behind the trap door of the stock. These were originally included so a soldier could quickly oil his gun in the field after lots of usage. When I shoot, I typically put through about six boxes of ammo and don't field oil it... it seems to stay pretty lubricated and I re-oil the internal oiler when I get home and clean it. Maybe if I shot 1000+ rounds through I would oil it at the range. I am not aware of the number of rounds suggested to when to field oil.

As Zamm said, just pop it out and apply oil when needed. There is also a small cushion (also missing in the WH) that fits inside the stock with the oiler can as well to prevent the rattle of the can in the compartment during movement and firing. IMA also has the original felt buttstock (WW2 surplus) cushions for $9.95 each... but no actual oil cans. I am not trying to pimp out IMA, but they seem to be the only ones to have these.

Thompson Buttstock Oil Can Cushions

You have to love America.... $9.95 for something that is probably worth a few cents.... as Ron says - "Thompson Greed!"


Chris.
  • 0

#11 Merry Ploughboy

Merry Ploughboy

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 894 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 31 December 2004 - 02:59 PM

The device that is stored in the butt stock should, perhaps, be more properly called an oil can.

The M1 and M1A1 use a round oil can.

If I recall, the 21 and 28 use two (or three?) of the felt "donut" cushions and the M1/M1A1 only use one.

Other details in "American Thunder", etc.

I believe Sarco, Numrich and Northridge all sell the oil cans for 28s and M1s.
  • 0

#12 OldFalGuy

OldFalGuy

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 700 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Central Texas
  • Interests:Sporting Clays, Skeet, Reloading and just plain Living

Posted 31 December 2004 - 03:18 PM

Yep, With the tip on the square bottle it could well be a oil can so to speak. Gee, I hope I don't need 3 of the felt things from IMA for can-$30 ohmy.gif
If PK says to runthe sucker wet I will then treat it like the rest of mine and lather it down well with CLP from a spray bottle- Haven't removed any of the blue (black) from either the Vickers or the mg42 and the M2 looks unfired too.

Mark
  • 0

#13 KGV

KGV

    Long Time Member

  • Regular Group
  • 16 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Jersey
  • Interests:Defending my 2nd amendment rights!

Posted 31 December 2004 - 03:18 PM

Omega Weapons Systems has the felt donuts for $5 each and oil cans for $25 each.
Here is a link to their site, http://www.omega-wea...com/catalog.htm

Ken

  • 0

#14 DC Chris

DC Chris

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 408 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Columbia, MD

Posted 31 December 2004 - 04:32 PM

Ken-

I saw this too, but I wasn't sure what "new" meant on the Omega website as if they were reproductions versus unissued. I would think WW2 surplus Thompson parts would be listed as used.

Anyone know or ordered one from omega? $25 for a butt stock oiler that is GI is a little on the cheap side with today's Thompson greed...(just kidding!)

I have one from Numerich.

MP- Only one was needed for my 28. I tried to put in a second but the door does not close.

Chris.
  • 0

#15 AZDoug

AZDoug

    Regular Member

  • Regular Group
  • 200 posts

Posted 01 January 2005 - 09:47 PM

Three felt donuts in the buttstock to hold teh oil can in place.

Doug
  • 0

#16 DC Chris

DC Chris

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 408 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Columbia, MD

Posted 02 January 2005 - 01:52 AM

Doug-

Please explain to me why three of these are required!?!? I am looking for information as this is not a '21 Colt but a '28 WH.

user posted image

My buttstock appears to be a WW2 GI surplus stock. These were proposed as NOS WW2 surplus buttstock oil can rattle donuts and with two or three of these installed the butt stock trap door will not shut. For me, one does the trick with a little bounce to release it.

Any information you can share on the subject is welcomed.

Chris.
  • 0

#17 AZDoug

AZDoug

    Regular Member

  • Regular Group
  • 200 posts

Posted 02 January 2005 - 02:28 AM

Could be Brain Fart.

I hate getting old.... huh.gif

I will look in the buttstock tomorrow, maybe it was two. I didn't remember them being that thick until I saw the picture. I am pretty sure I had to drop three in, one for spacing and the other two held the oiler. Your buttstock wouldn't have a an old one mashed up inside at the bottom of the hole?

Gonna check out the rates at the local senility old folks home tomorrow if it was less than three. blink.gif

Doug
  • 0

#18 DC Chris

DC Chris

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 408 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Columbia, MD

Posted 02 January 2005 - 04:28 AM

Doug-

I am not trying to bust your cohonies - I am for sure that there is not one smashed up inside the buttstock. I clearly looked inside with a flashlight and a long screw driver.

I guess I was looking to see if the depth of the oiler hole can was different per each butt stock or fabrication.

MP - You are correct sir. Oil can is a much better description versus "other oiler".

Chris.
  • 0

#19 AZDoug

AZDoug

    Regular Member

  • Regular Group
  • 200 posts

Posted 03 January 2005 - 02:39 AM

OK. i checked two stocks.

A 1921/28 Colt stock with swivel that seems two have two felt donuts in it, anda non-crossbolted WWII stock (NOS stuff, those unfinished ones they used to sell for $10). The W12 marked NOS stock took three donuts to keep the oilcan from rattling against the access plate. These were old donuts, not new, that I bought from someplace like SARCO, and put in if that makes any difference.

Doug
  • 0