Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Carbon Buildup In Cutts Compensator


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 Roger in AZ

Roger in AZ

    Member

  • Regular Group
  • 24 posts
  • Location:Phoenix, Arizona

Posted 17 September 2003 - 09:17 PM

I was looking through a Dillon Blue Press catalog and they sell a product that is supposed to prevent fouling of compensators, muzzle breaks etc. The product is called Carter's fouling preventative and compensator spray. Anyone use this on your Cutts compensator and if so how well does it work and will it damage the finish of a Thompson.

Thanks

Roger

  • 0

#2 PK.

PK.

    Technical Expert

  • Board Benefactor
  • 1567 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CO, USA
  • Interests:Full time gunsmith who loves Thompsons, 35+ years experience.

Posted 17 September 2003 - 09:55 PM

It will not damage the finish and works well with TMJ or FMJ bullets; nothing will help lead bullets. I understand the other “standard” is welding anti spatter spray available at welding supply stores. I have a can I use in the weld shop but haven’t run out of Carter’s yet.
  • 0

#3 Ron A

Ron A

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 641 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Helena, Montana
  • Interests:Collector of Thompson guns & items<br>Colt single actions<br>Native American items - pre 1900

Posted 17 September 2003 - 10:07 PM

PK as always is correct - this spray is great in my 1919 and the thompson, however I have not found anything that will help remove the leading from the comp of the thompson. Just dont shoot lead in the thompson. The bbl will also lead up and that is a bitch to clean out..
  • 0

#4 Chopper28

Chopper28

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Board Donor
  • 710 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Class III stuff and Harleys

Posted 18 September 2003 - 12:35 AM

I have used the Carters comp spray recommended by PK and I find it to work very well. It does not hurt the finish and is easy to use. One bottle will last you a looooong time. Well worth the price. Good product. Just my .02
  • 0

#5 Whiskey Brother

Whiskey Brother

    Regular Member

  • Regular Group
  • 136 posts

Posted 19 September 2003 - 04:23 PM

I agree with PhilOhio, I've been shooting my hand cast lead bullets through my Semi-Thompson for years, and I have never had leading of the barrel. That might be a different story with full auto, but in semi's they work good. I use wheelweights fluxed with Marvelux from Brownells, and it works great!
  • 0

#6 Ron A

Ron A

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 641 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Helena, Montana
  • Interests:Collector of Thompson guns & items<br>Colt single actions<br>Native American items - pre 1900

Posted 19 September 2003 - 06:48 PM

PhilOhio - you are right, it will depend on the alloy. When I have purchased cast bullets I have not always be able to tell what the alloy is. In some cases in full auto those would lead. As I don't cast for 45, I have chose to use FMJ. and solve the problem. However the copper plated lead bullets which PK suggested don't lead..

  • 0

#7 PK.

PK.

    Technical Expert

  • Board Benefactor
  • 1567 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:CO, USA
  • Interests:Full time gunsmith who loves Thompsons, 35+ years experience.

Posted 20 September 2003 - 09:25 AM

I agree with everything you have said Phil, except one notion; a plain base lead bullet will allow vaporization of a small amount of metal from the heat and gas abrasion of propellant combustion. This will cool and deposit in the comp. Granted, the composition of the alloy will affect this to a greater or lesser degree, but in my experience some lead fouling will be found deposited in the comp along with the usual combustion byproducts deposited by any ammunition. Is this a problem? I can be if the alloy is less than optimal.

Handloading is a time consuming hobby many just can’t entertain. Bullet casting in particular consumes a large amount of hours. I would have to venture that the majority of us just don’t have that luxury of time to cast and load. Most will simply buy the cheapest bullet they can get and make up some blasting ammo, until they discover the results in their barrel and comp. Then thy go to FMJ or TMJ.

Back to the original question; spray your comp. I have gotten a sample of a product called “Gas Piston Parts and Choke Tube Cleaner” from Slip 2000. They claim it will work well in a TAMG Cutts. I have a nasty one to try it on and will do so and report back soon.

By the way Phil, if you are ever in the area I have 2200# of Linotype, I’ll fix you up with an arm load. I’d ship it but I don’t think you’d like the bill. laugh.gif

  • 0

#8 SecondAmend

SecondAmend

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 610 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 20 September 2003 - 01:47 PM

PhilOhio re "all this education is eventually wasted"

Hopefully, this messageboard can act as an "expert system" such that the combined knowledge shared herein is available to all, for all civilized time.
  • 0

#9 Fullauto

Fullauto

    New Member

  • Regular Group
  • 9 posts

Posted 27 October 2003 - 08:56 AM

I found an interesting phenomenon. I was using a batch of mixed cases, Norinco and Fiocchi, and found that due to the difference in case hardness, the rate of fire varied throughout the firing of the mixed ammo. The Norinco cases with the noticably softer brass had a lower rate of fire with the same powder/bullet combo. Easy solution. Batched my brass and used an extra half a grain of 231 in the Norinco cases.
  • 0

#10 Grey Crow

Grey Crow

    RKI Member

  • Board Donor
  • 1077 posts
  • Location:North Central Pennsylvania
  • Interests:Thompson Submachine guns, computers, reptiles.

Posted 27 October 2003 - 09:41 AM

Ok, just for a little clarification for me.
A long time ago I was told by a gunsmith that in heavily leaded barrels that mercury if left to stand overnight would remove lead from the barrel. (This is a very dangerous practice due to the toxicity of the metal) but it blends with the lead similar to the way it does silver. The mercury can be strained from the lead once it is removed from the barrel. The procedure does require plugging the barrel and filling it with the mercury.
  • 0

#11 Ron A

Ron A

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 641 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Helena, Montana
  • Interests:Collector of Thompson guns & items<br>Colt single actions<br>Native American items - pre 1900

Posted 27 October 2003 - 01:22 PM

There is a product you can purchase at a drug store called "Blue Ointment" it contains a high % of mercury, or it use too. I am not sure if it stills has as much as in prior years as the tube I have is around 10 years old. I put in on with a patch and let sit overnight and the lead will just push out with a bore brush. Blue ointment is for the treatment of Crabs.
  • 0

#12 Ron A

Ron A

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 641 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Helena, Montana
  • Interests:Collector of Thompson guns & items<br>Colt single actions<br>Native American items - pre 1900

Posted 27 October 2003 - 05:46 PM

Phil Ord - you win!
  • 0

#13 full auto 45

full auto 45

    Respected Member

  • Board Benefactor
  • 4606 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Looking over your shoulder right now
  • Interests:Thompson's, Any Machinegun, Harley's and scuba diving. In that order.

Posted 27 October 2003 - 06:09 PM

Hell those infested little bugers swimming in the Chesapeake have so much mercury in them now you could stick one in a thermometor and it would work right! And of course the South Central Los Angeles PINK Snappers are the worst for infestation.
  • 0

#14 john

john

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 552 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Saint Paul, Minnesota

Posted 28 October 2003 - 07:21 PM

I've just been using the welding anti-spatter spray in my 28. Spray it on when it's clean and the lead still builds up (even shooting jacketed bullets....still lead open in base) BUT the stuff flakes off with a little nudge from a popsicle stick....no scratches or gouges!
The can I have was marketed by LINDE Welding supply (I believe it's soy oil and Co2 as a propellant) but there are several others.

No evidence of buildup or abnormal corrosion, etc....doesn't seem to hurt the finish at all and cleans right off in my dunk bucket.

john
  • 0