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Proper Storage Humidity?


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#1 Sig

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Posted 09 March 2005 - 09:18 PM

I want to know opinions and more importantly sources of any facts that are available on proper firearms storage humidty.
I have a dehumidifier that will allow just about any selection possible. I understand TOO dry shrinks the wood, NOT good. I have a couple Colt Thomspons and way too many Colt accessories so want the right #.
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#2 full auto 45

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Posted 10 March 2005 - 08:18 AM

I leave mine set between 50-60%. Seems to work fine for several years now.
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#3 nobra81

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Posted 12 March 2005 - 10:02 AM

I keep mine at 60 to 65%. Works fine, but I've seen where people say 50% should be your target

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#4 dalbert

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 01:39 AM

I was about to post a new topic on the subject of humidity control, and found this post that SIG made last year on the board. (Thanks, Michael!)

OK, please forgive me if I sound like a novice with some of my questions, but I'm moving to a whole new climate that I'm not used to, and want to make sure my guns don't rust. I'm accustomed to storage of guns in Hawaii and Texas, but not Ohio. In Hawaii, we kept them very well oiled, and in the dryest location possible, along with some dessicant. In Texas, they seem to do fine with normal oiling and air conditioned storage. I will have a basement storage location in Ohio, and am obviously concerned with higher humidity.

I have not used dehumidifiers before. I am looking to purchase one (possbily a DeLonghi 30 pint machine that will operate down to 44 degrees), and want to get any advice that board members might be able to offer. The storage space is just over 200 square feet, and I have several safes, as well as some guns that will be on display racks. Should I used Goldenrod dehumidifiers inside the safes in addition to the whole room dehumidifier? Is there a more favorable brand or certain features that I should look for? The dehumidifier will discharge to a sump pump. I plan to purchase a hygrometer to monitor humidity, and from what I have read and seen in this post, I will probably try to maintain a setting around 50%.

Are my plans valid? Is there anything I should consider that I haven't mentioned regarding basement humidity control?

Thanks In Advance!

David Albert
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#5 philasteen

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 07:14 AM

David, I'm in Florida and I use the goldenrods with great success. I would recommend them.
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#6 Grey Crow

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 10:08 AM

I would think that Pennsylvania and Ohio have very similar climates. I've kept a several guns in a wooden box for the past 15 years with no humidity control at all. They are at room temperature and get a very light wipe down every six months, when I remember.
One of the guns is a blued revolver that is additionally stored inside a foam lined case with its accessories.
Recently I obtained a safe and use a Golden Rod, but still no additional moisture control. In PA especially in August the humidity is so thick a knife will slice it.
I have another problem due to extremely sweaty hands. But to date just keeping everything oiled has worked.

I actually have more concern for the vintage paper products from the 20's as they are far more fragile than the firearms.

I have a friend who has a rifle that was given to the family by William Penn to pay a debt. It hangs on the wall above the fire place. It has been stored this way for years, with only an occasional dusting and oil. The flintlock is in new condition considering its age and history.

Just my .02
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#7 Lancer

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 10:15 AM

Dave
I live about 100 miles north of you. A lot depends on when and how your home was built. Mine was built in the mid 50's with very little basement water proofing and the basement is 1200 sq.ft. Before I bought my dehumidifier, I kept track of the basement humidity level for several years. They ranged from lows of 30%-35% in the winter months to 80%-90% in the summer months. Last June I bought a SEARS 70 pint dehumidifier and was easily able to lower the level to the 45%-55% level. Like Phil, I'm not comfortable storing guns in the basement so I have not addressed the winter low humidity levels. You would most likely have to use a humidifier to raise the level in the winter.
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#8 dalbert

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Posted 15 April 2006 - 04:41 PM

Thanks for the advice. The house has a humidifier for the winter months, and was built in 1997. I'm fairly certain it stays dry, as most of the basement is finished out, and the house is on a hill, so I believe it drains well. Nonetheless, I want to be prepared for anything. I think I'll go ahead and buy the dehumidifier, and several of the Goldenrods for the safes. I'll have to monitor everything closely.

Thanks Again!

David Albert
dalbert@sturmgewehr.com
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