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Wwii L Drums


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#21 Arthur Fliegenheimer

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 01:14 PM

As of 2003, Richardson identified only one Bridgeport Drum and of course the George Goll marked Bridgeport Drum variation in his last updated 1996 publication. So in the last 9 years, somebody beat DH's time and discovered at least two other variation Bridgeport Drums?
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#22 Mike Hammer

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 05:57 PM

What seems incredible now is that nearly a quarter million of the wartime 50 rd drums were destroyed at the end of 1944 due to being "obsolete" because of the 30 rd magazine. What an tremendous waste. Makes you wonder how many old 50 rounders are left out there? sad.gif

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#23 Z3BigDaddy

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 06:35 PM

Or when they lined up all the PT boats and lit them all on fire......
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#24 gijive

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Posted 17 May 2005 - 07:52 PM

Mike Hammer and Roger,

I reread the recent TCA article on the Universal Stamping made drums for Auto-Ordnance. I stand corrected, there is a U stamped drum with 1921 Model winding instructions. I had previously believed they were last made by Worcester. Thanks for posting the correction.

I still wouldn't refer to it as a Bridgeport, however, it does have the New York Auto-Ordnance address. Regardless of manufacturer, it would be referred to as a "New York" drum.
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#25 TSMG28

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Posted 18 May 2005 - 11:44 AM

gijive,

I agree with your comment about calling the first United Specialties drum a "Bridgeport" drum. I was thinking about that last night and came to the same conclusion you did. Doug Richardson referred to this version as a Savage drum because of its coincidence with the "commercial" Savage Thompson which also had the New York address on the receiver.

Perhaps the best way to refer to these drums is the way we refer to all other drums, by the manufacturer (or supposed manufacturer). Therefore, my earlier post should have said there are five variations of the United Specialties drums rather than saying Bridgeport drums.

Arthur,

If we use the terminology above, Doug actually identified three variations of the United Specialties drums in his book. As I mentioned earlier in this thread, he then added a fourth in a TCN article a number of years after his book was created. Doug identified the first variation, which he called the Savage drum, the fourth variation, which he simply refers to in his book as the Bridgeport drum, and the George Goll drum, which from the photos appears to be either a third variation example or a one-off special (it's hard to tell from the picture in Doug's book). I don't have the TCN article in front of me, but I recall (hopefully correctly), that the variation he found later was the second (with the WIND TO 9 CLICKS on the cover but the Bridgeport address on the body).

Of course, as Doug points out in his book and Tracie points out in the latest TCN article, swapping of bodies and covers was common, so who knows how many true variations were originally manufactured. Without any records or personal testimony, we will never know for sure.

All of this does not represent any original research on my part. I was simply trying to answer some questions that arose using available resources (Doug's drum book, TCN, and some personal observartions). Doug Richardson has probably forgotten more about Thompsons than I know, so I have to defer to him and Tracie when it comes to the minutia.

Mike,

As other posts have mentioned, I don't even want to think about all of the unique history and material that has been destroyed because it was out of vogue.

Roger
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#26 TSMG28

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Posted 23 May 2005 - 12:12 PM

Just to close the loop on this thread, I spoke with Tracie this past weekend about the United Specialties drum variations. He was able to confirm the pedigree of each of the five variations he wrote about in TCN.

Also, I need to amend my comments about the variations identified by Doug Richardson. The "new" variation he wrote about in TCN as after he published the second edition of his drum book. His third edition, which I have, does include that variation. Therefore, his book identifies three unique variations as I noted in the earlier post. Just wanted to keep the record straight.....
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#27 Arthur Fliegenheimer

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Posted 23 May 2005 - 01:27 PM


TSMG 28,
In DR's third edition (1996) "Drum Magazines," I can find only two L drums he identifies as Bridgeport's. In fact in DR's explanation of the Goll drum he states,

"The most interesting aspect of the Goll drum is the fact that it was made without the STANDARD COVER MARKINGS. For this reason it has been included here as an authentic variation of the standard Bridgeport drum."

Am I missing the page that DR identifies this third version?

But is Tracie going to put out a TCN article addressing the confusion he started by mislabeling photos in his book about the no "NO" numbered third variation of the Colt drum as being a Worcester?

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#28 TSMG28

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Posted 23 May 2005 - 03:43 PM

Arthur,

As I indicated in my previous post, it appears from the pictures in Doug's book that the Goll drum was made from a third variation drum based on the cover markings. Since Doug did not recgonize this as a legitimate variation, he included the proper text that you quoted. If the Goll drum is indeed a one-off, then it is the unigue variant that Doug calls it.

I will let you discuss with Tracie the issue of the pictures in American Legend....
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