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Wood Stripping


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#1 adlake

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Posted 13 August 2005 - 05:40 PM

Hi all


I know this is been covered before and I read in FAQ above, but perhaps someone maybe found a better way in wood stripping. The coats of linseed oil and stain, That need to be removed in order to restain the wood again. What are your ways to stripping wood to the bare grain with out damaging the wood.? Thanks all-adlake
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#2 Grey Crow

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Posted 13 August 2005 - 09:16 PM

Oven cleaner and water seem to work the best, then sand off the fuzzies stain then oil.
Handle the wood VERY carefully because it will dent easily in this state until the finish hardens.
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#3 Gunner

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Posted 14 August 2005 - 10:15 AM

I have gotten mixed results with oven cleaner, so much so that I no longer trust it. It's done great on some woods, but ruined others -- they turn a nasty gray-green color. Oven cleaner can ruin the molecular structure. If you're not worried about ruining markings, I'd sand.
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#4 Lancer

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Posted 14 August 2005 - 10:29 AM

I also find oven cleaner a bit scary to use.
I've had some nice results using Formby's finish remover and very fine steel wool. Use a light touch around any cartouches. Doesn't seem to raise the grain or damage the wood in any appreciable way.
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#5 Hurridale

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Posted 14 August 2005 - 11:04 AM

I've learned to stay away from oven cleaner, too. Again, mixed results and I've had some wood crack using it.

Something that's worked for me is to scrub it off as best you can using detergent, rinse, then run it thru the dishwasher with regular dishwashing detergent (just don't use any heated drying.). Let it dry for few hours, sand down the raised grain, then oil it. Steel wool (0000) between oil coats, finishing off with buffing with some old nylons.

Does a great job of stripping down to the wood and raising the grain -- in fact, TOO nice of raising grains if you want to preserve cartouches.

I got the idea after seeing what the dishwasher did to my wooden handled knives.

Edited by Hurridale, 14 August 2005 - 11:06 AM.

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#6 M1Brian

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Posted 14 August 2005 - 11:47 AM

Try giving the stock a quick wipe with a rag lightly dampend with laquer thinner. Air blow dry and use some 000 steel wool to smooth out. Put a new coat of oil on and away you go. I tried it on a cmp garand and a light wipe removed 60 years of oil in one swipe. I had never used that method before and after trying it on a small area I did all the wood in a matter of minutes. The gun looks beautiful and I have noticed no adverse affects since doing it several years ago.
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#7 Grey Crow

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Posted 14 August 2005 - 08:04 PM

I've cleaned 5 stocks with oven cleaner all with great results.
A few have been done with just good old fashioned sand paper. I also use Rottenstone from Brownells.
I have found that using a wet towel and steam iron works fantastic for raising small dents where the fibers have not been broken.
From there its stain and oil.

Once a coat or two of oil have been added you may find a few areas that require a little more work.

Next time I order from Brownells I'll get some Whiting, I'm always open for different methods.

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#8 full auto 45

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Posted 14 August 2005 - 08:46 PM

Wipe it down with laquer thinner. It raises the wood so be sure to let it dry for a day or so before you start sanding. I've done 2 or 3 like that. Leaves it looking white and fuzzy.
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