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Exporting Tsmg Parts


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#1 Roland, Headless Thompson Gunner

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Posted 22 August 2005 - 04:39 PM

I suspect I know the answer to this but can I as an individual sell and ship spare TSMG parts to a fellow downunder?
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#2 full auto 45

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Posted 22 August 2005 - 05:37 PM

You can ship away all the TSMG parts you want. But the feds won't let you bring them back in. That way they can get them out of our hands. Bastards. But sometimes....you can get things back, but that is another story.
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#3 Arthur Fliegenheimer

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Posted 22 August 2005 - 11:07 PM

You can't legally ship TSMG parts out of the country, but a tourist can come to the U.S. and then legally bring back such parts to their country in their luggage? Wouldn't customs be involved in both methods of delivery? I'm thinking of Murry and the C drums he had no trouble bringing back to New Zealand.
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#4 TSMG28

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Posted 23 August 2005 - 11:57 AM

Murray follows the NZ Customs laws to great detail. He secures the necessary import licenses in advance when he knows what he will be acquiring, and handles it in real time when special opportunities like the C drum pop up.

So as far as NZ importation is concerned, he is covered. I don't know about the laws concerning the purchase of items in the U.S. by a foreign national who carries them out of the country.

Also, is a magazine considered a "component or part" of a Thompson, or does this mean actual parts of the firearm. Does web gear to hold the magazine qualify as a component or part. I am certain you could get a number of different interpretations of all of this.....
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#5 Balder

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Posted 23 August 2005 - 12:28 PM

So if I, while visiting the United States, buy - let's say a 20-round magazine for an FN FAL G-1 - and bring it back to Norway, am I commiting a crime? Under Norwegian law I am not. Just curious.

Regards,

Balder
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#6 Balder

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Posted 23 August 2005 - 04:53 PM

Sorry if I didn't make myself clear in my last post: Will my hypothetical baggage of one FN FAL magazine represent an infringement on US laws? Will I, if caught by US officals upon leaving the USA, risk any legal repercussions? I am not planning a future smuggling career, I am just trying to find out what I can legally bring out of the USA since I go there on a fairly regular basis. Thank you.

Balder
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#7 PATHFINDER

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Posted 24 August 2005 - 12:22 AM

QUOTE (hardrede @ Aug 23 2005, 07:53 PM)
OTOH, if the magazine images on an X-Ray machine, who knows???


Oh god, I can't believe this..........Hardrede is right. Sneaking them in and out of the country will just get you caught. Yes we will see the magazine on the x-ray and if you are leaving the country we will question and confiscate. You most likely will be charged and may not be allowed to re-enter the US. We are extreeeeeeemly sensitive to firearm components in all forms even on domestic flights. Try to hide them inside of something and you will get an 'artful concealment' charge (sometimes a felony).

We had a gent moving last minute stock to gun show (AR parts) and the x-ray op spotted the parts and the LEOs were called and they where citing him for an undeclared weapon. I stepped in as DHS/TSA rep and stopped the citation as it did not fit the lawful definition of a firearm: he had no receivers. They wanted to argue that he 'lots of gun parts there' 'enough to assemble 15-20 weapons'. I asked the LEOs to put one together in front of me without a lower. They kept saying the uppers were the receivers etc etc. I won and he was allowed to fly by TSA and the LEOs but then the air carrier freaked when they saw a milk crates worth of gun parts and told him he could not check the bag on their plane!!!

Here is the point: A semi-retired 50 something hausfrau, now working for TSA, is fully trained to spot firearm components on CTX type x-ray machines and does it with surprising accuracy. She has no more idea where that part goes or what it does than a rabbit has about driving a car, but she knows it is a gun part and will flag the bag.

Also, if you have firearm components in your carry on, be prepared to miss your flight and spend a little time with your government explaining why you needed that Colt 1911 slide in your carry on bag.

If everyone just follows the laws then no one has reason to bitch about people owning guns but the ones who keep sliding by until they get caught make us all look bad when they do. Some will always try to get around the law or ignore the law and when the law is changed to one we can not help but follow (prohibition of firearms ownership for example) they will be the first to complain "what happened?" Be a responsible firearms owner and follow ALL the laws. Even the ones you don't like.

I will paraphrase Alexander here:

We are all firearms collectors alike here. We follow the rules. We are the example of what responsible gun ownership can be. If you can not change your ways, then change your name, for you are not one of us.
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