Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Roger Cox Book


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Poprivit

Poprivit

    Long Time Member

  • Regular Group
  • 122 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 17 January 2006 - 03:24 PM

Much has been said about Mr. Cox's book, it's value, and possibility of reprint. I've never seen a copy, but I understand it's quite valuable. I own a publishiung house (small) and am an author of 10 books. I'm quite familiar with the publishing busines and have a comment, or two about a reprint.

1. Unless the book had quite a high cover price, sales would have to be at least 1,000 to pay printing, ISBN fees, USA book rights, shipping, etc. I understand that Sarco had the rights at one time - do they still?

2. My last effort ws "The Complete Guide to Cessna Aircraft" 2nd edition (Amazon.com; B&N and others). I printed 2500 copies a few years ago. Any one want to buy a few hundred? $19.95 ... I've got lots left.

3. Nitch, specialty, or 'boy's books" publishing is a VERY time-consuming proceedure. For instance ... where would the publisher get all the photos for the book. Just copying the ones in the original will not work. A copy of a copy prints poorly. There's a moire effect that comes from scanning a photo in a book. In other words, it wouldn't come out well at all.

4. Photos probably could be acquired by hitting up all the TCA, MG.com and private owners, but using old photos would require getting written permission from the owners.

5. Figure 8 months to a year for publication.. Look at how many problems Mike has with a calendar. And thats only 12-15 photos and 20-35 pages. I estimate 150-200 photos for a book, both black and white and 150-200 pages.

6. The BIG ONE - who will advance the $6500 to $8000 to do the book?

7. At $100 per book, 65-80 would have to sell just to pay costs.
Would 80 of you put up that kind of money?
or
160 @ $50
320 @$25
And this is just cost. I like to think a profit can be made in publishing - especially after 8 mos. of work, so double all the figures. That would return $8k in net sales, or $1k per month.
Bottom line, just how bad do we want/need a book?
I'm more than open to discussion, be it here or e-mail.

Tom Murphy
Cartier House Wholesalers and Publishers
Gardnerville, NV
tfmurphy3@charter.net
  • 0

#2 LIONHART

LIONHART

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 2785 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Thompsons of course. All Manufactures and Models.

Posted 17 January 2006 - 10:07 PM

Get a hold of SARCO. They sold the rights and everything else of the Cox Book a few years back. Whomever purchased the lot, didn't do anything with it. I could see them selling in the $80.00-$100.00 Range.
  • 0

#3 giantpanda4

giantpanda4

    Respected Member

  • Board Benefactor
  • 2061 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Howell, MI 48855
  • Interests:Mechanical toys - cars, instruments, and of course - guns. The 1921-28 thompsons are the epitomy of perfection for a mechanical device that fills all my interests!

Posted 18 January 2006 - 07:10 AM

I agree with Lionhart! iagree.gif $100 does not seem too bad for a reprint that is as good quality as an original!

Maybe approach the TCA or even TATA as a group for funding...??? Though Tracie has a rival book....

I would be very supportive of this!

Once you obtain the rights to do it, let us know!
  • 0

#4 TD.

TD.

    Respected Member

  • Board Benefactor
  • 2882 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 January 2006 - 07:36 AM

I purchased a Roger Cox book and Supplement from Roger when they were first offered for sale. At the time this book was certainly the definitive book on the Thompson Submachine Gun. In a word, CLASSIC! I do not think the Chapter on the Industrial Thompsons has been duplicated anywhere. However, most of the information in this book has been added to (dare I say improved) by new publications. If you have Tracie, Gordon and Frank's books along with a couple from Doug and the TCA newsletters, you pretty much have everything covered. Does anyone really think a reprint of this book for upwards of $100 will sell more than 50 copies. I don't see anyone with an original book buying one. That along with the fact original books do come on the market place on a semi-regular basis make the prospects of sucess for a project like this very slim. Of course, that is just my opinion. Let's hear from others on this topic.


  • 0

#5 giantpanda4

giantpanda4

    Respected Member

  • Board Benefactor
  • 2061 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Howell, MI 48855
  • Interests:Mechanical toys - cars, instruments, and of course - guns. The 1921-28 thompsons are the epitomy of perfection for a mechanical device that fills all my interests!

Posted 18 January 2006 - 08:49 AM

TD,

One of my criteria for establishing a reprint price is what the old original ones are selling for. Z3 will attest, there are none under $495 for sale. Some are asking $1100!

I believe there are sufficient buyers at $100 to do this!
  • 0

#6 LIONHART

LIONHART

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 2785 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Thompsons of course. All Manufactures and Models.

Posted 18 January 2006 - 10:55 AM

Indeed. Originals are commanding very high prices, that many in the hobby just can't afford. With all the interest in Thompson's I'm sure you would have a hard time keeping any on hand, and I'm sure that those who own Originals would most likely buy the Reprint as well. These Books woudn't be bringing $400.00+++ if there wasn't a demand for them.
  • 0

#7 Arthur Fliegenheimer

Arthur Fliegenheimer

    Respected Member

  • Regular Group
  • 3453 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 January 2006 - 12:32 PM

Just to echo TD's sentiments, I think the demand for the Cox book is because of it's collector status. It was the definitive book on the minutia of Colt TSMG"S, but since 1982, other authors have added to, and even corrected, Cox's original work. I wouldn't go so far as to say the book is obsolete, but why would someone want a copy when the value of the book lies in its original 1982 date of publication?

I never could understand the point of the reproduction Colt TSMG brochures. There is scant information contained in them and their appeal lies primarily in their collectablability. Why would those who already have original Cox books, or brochures, want reproductions of them? They are not printed on delicate parchment so referring to them as a reference isn't going to depreciate their value. It's not as if it were a how to mechanics book on cars or cycles, so there is not much chance of getting grease and oil on the pages.

$1100? Was that the one Cox book in color and signed by relatives of Eickhoff, Payne and Marcellus?

Making a copy hardcover Cox book would have to cost more than $100. How much more than a $100 would people pay for it rather than procure an original? It seems the Cox book does show up on ebay several times a year with prices that are in the $300-$400. Why pay $150 for a copy when $300 rings the bell?

  • 0

#8 John Jr

John Jr

    Long Time RKI Member

  • Regular Group
  • 1956 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Mena, Arkansas, USA
  • Interests:Plenty

Posted 18 January 2006 - 09:34 PM

If I can get 1100 for my book, its gone and I will even throw in the supplement!


  • 0

#9 giantpanda4

giantpanda4

    Respected Member

  • Board Benefactor
  • 2061 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Howell, MI 48855
  • Interests:Mechanical toys - cars, instruments, and of course - guns. The 1921-28 thompsons are the epitomy of perfection for a mechanical device that fills all my interests!

Posted 18 January 2006 - 10:34 PM

I guess I owe an update here... the $1100 was a book for sale on Amazon (used) I saw before Christmas. Now the only one there is a "low price" of $699.

I'd rather have the $100 reprint....
  • 0

#10 Poprivit

Poprivit

    Long Time Member

  • Regular Group
  • 122 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 19 January 2006 - 03:48 PM

Philohio

Ahhhhh, the Beechcraft Bonanza. Mine was a V-Tail. Never has so much been spent to fly so few! biggrin.gif
  • 0