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cantgrowup

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Everything posted by cantgrowup

  1. Hey.... if Hamer said she was "squatting on it" then I think that it was as Hamer said...... It was taped to her thigh. What I've noticed is that the three of the weapons that Hamer said was in the Death Car (the Clyde 1911, the Bonnie 1911, and the Bonnie .38 Detective Special) all had serial numbers or "United States Property" marking filed off. I'm beginning to believe that Hamer himself had these markings filed off. The Clyde 1911 and the Bonnie 1911 both had the "United States Property' markings filed off, and the .38 Detective Special had the SN filed off. Since B&C were wanted for murder and subject to the electric chair, they would not have had the time nor inclination, not care to modify these three weapons in the manner that they were later auctioned off as. I'm thinking that Hamer himself modified these three firearms so that he could obscure their legal ownership (either to the US government, or a civilian owner). I'm thinking that Hamer modified weapons so that they would not be easily traced to the Federal government, or a legal civilian owner. I'm thinking that the military-issue Bonnie 1911 that was given to Lee Simmons by Hamer as a momento was either modified and nickle plated by Hamer or Simmons afterwards. Your thoughts?
  2. At what price would it NOT be a bargain parts kit?
  3. I just added a nice Colt 1909 New Service .45 LC revolver to my B&C collection. One of these was found in the Death Car and is clearly shown in the Bienville Parish Deputy Sheriff AB Rogers "white board" photo of the Death Car weapons (shown above) that were left after the posse had taken their "souvenirs".
  4. Just noticed this post... I live in the Shreveport/Bossier area and shoot at Long Range Alley or Bodcau ranges.
  5. Hmmmm...... Seeing as how your gunsmith son blued my "1918 WW1" configured A3 and did a beautiful job..... I vote "blue".
  6. The only issue that I had with it was the initial installation. The threads were very tight and I used a bench grinder with wire wheel to polish the threads and worked the gas regulator into the gas tube many times .... advancing a few thread turns at a time... taking it out after each try and cleaning again with the wire wheel and liberally oiling. I finally got it to go all the way to where the ports lined up. I don't know what the thread size and pitch are on the regulator body, but ideally I would like to run it through a die to make sure the threads are cut correctly. Thanks ... Luckily, I know a good gun smith Oldtrooper.... I took the A3 back out today and tried shooting it with the BMGparts.com WW1 style gas regulator set on the smallest port. The gun fired and cycled perfectly, just like it did on the mid-setting two days before. Since it works well on that lowest setting, I will probably leave it there to save wear and tear on the gun due to less gas pressure. The gas regulator came out easily for cleaning after the two recent shoots so I probably don't need to do any further thread work on my regulator. I would have tried "ump-firing" but this particular nearby range doesn't allow rapid fire. I'll try it when I go to my less-restrictive range. The guy at BMG parts called and finally has the regulators in stock ... I have one on the way ... $100.00 ... I'll give you a range report when I install it. They charged me $150 !!!!!!!!!!!!!
  7. Thanks guys! I was shooting pretty good groups... just high. Now I know why!
  8. I've just shot my recently converted to WW1 style 1918A3 and realized that it shoots about 6" high at 50 yds and approximately 10" at 100 yds using handloaded M2 ball loads. Since there is no rear sight de-elevation option, there are no further elevation options other than a higher front sight blade. Has anyone else experienced this? I didn't have a spotter to let me know where it was hitting on the berm at 200 yds... so I gave up for the day. Not that I'm going to shoot this bugger much in the future, but it's frustrating that it isn't spot on at 100 yds with rear sight ladder laying down.
  9. The only issue that I had with it was the initial installation. The threads were very tight and I used a bench grinder with wire wheel to polish the threads and worked the gas regulator into the gas tube many times .... advancing a few thread turns at a time... taking it out after each try and cleaning again with the wire wheel and liberally oiling. I finally got it to go all the way to where the ports lined up. I don't know what the thread size and pitch are on the regulator body, but ideally I would like to run it through a die to make sure the threads are cut correctly. Thanks ... Luckily, I know a good gun smith Oldtrooper.... I took the A3 back out today and tried shooting it with the BMGparts.com WW1 style gas regulator set on the smallest port. The gun fired and cycled perfectly, just like it did on the mid-setting two days before. Since it works well on that lowest setting, I will probably leave it there to save wear and tear on the gun due to less gas pressure. The gas regulator came out easily for cleaning after the two recent shoots so I probably don't need to do any further thread work on my regulator. I would have tried "ump-firing" but this particular nearby range doesn't allow rapid fire. I'll try it when I go to my less-restrictive range.
  10. The only issue that I had with it was the initial installation. The threads were very tight and I used a bench grinder with wire wheel to polish the threads and worked the gas regulator into the gas tube many times .... advancing a few thread turns at a time... taking it out after each try and cleaning again with the wire wheel and liberally oiling. I finally got it to go all the way to where the ports lined up. I don't know what the thread size and pitch are on the regulator body, but ideally I would like to run it through a die to make sure the threads are cut correctly.
  11. I fired my OOW WW1 style M1918 for the first time today with the new-manufacture "old style" gas regulator offered by BMGparts.com and it functioned perfectly. I only shot 12 rounds. I had it on the mid-setting and had no failures to eject or load. I recommend it.
  12. No... but our Louisiana stay-at-home order lifts tomorrow and I think I might finally get to go out and shoot the "beast". If I do, I'll let you know how the regulator works.
  13. Has anyone successfully tried *ump-firing their A3 without using any mechanical device? Can the rifle be supported with one arm and pulled against stationary trigger hand? I haven't tried yet on my A3 because our range is still closed due to CV19.... so I was just wondering if it's possible. I guess one could use the "belt loop" *ump-fire method, but surely the ATF has also banned belt loops as a machine gun. (See how I avoided the illegal use of the dreaded word but I'm sure that "they" see right through my subterfuge. )
  14. When did they switch to the later-style charging handle that is seen on the A2?
  15. Thanks dalbert. I have only recently learned of Mr. Lehman and his famous guns for Dillinger and Nelson. According to Wiki, the Western Field Model 30 was first offered by as a store-branded shotgun by Montgomery Wards in 1925, and the Ranger Model 30 was offered by Sears and Roebuck in the same year, both of which were manufactured by Stevens (Savage). I'm not sure how far back other "Western Field" and "Ranger" guns were marketed by the two stores.
  16. I would love to see that article. But that was only 4 days after the ambush and I'm sure that given time, the FBI or some other agency could get it to fire at least one shell from it for ballistic testing. It could have been cut apart just to get the firing pin and installed in another Browning for test purposes. So... I don't doubt the link to the Grapevine killings. I've always maintained that the weapon had no value because it was non-functional and therefore useless to anyone as a firearm. That's why it was not taken by any of the posse members (as evidenced by the "white board" photo) and was probably discarded after testing.
  17. I agree Rob. Even Hamer said she had it hidden in a place where no lawman would have looked. It was backup for Clyde.
  18. Hans, The Bonnie revolver sold at auction in 2012. One of the items with the gun was a note written by Frank Hamer to former Texas Ranger Buster Davis on the back of a Texas Ranger Expense form. https://www.icollector.com/Bonnie-Parker-Colt-Detective-Special-38-revolver_i13906835# The Browning Auto 5 16g shotgun that is clearly visible in the 16mm film and stills, as well as several other photos. It is identifiable by the magazine cut-off lever on the lower left receiver, the sliding safety in the front trigger guard, and the rounded pommel on the buttstock, This is the "Browning Auto" (not a BAR as commonly reported) that was damaged by a bullet strike during the ambush. In the photo of Deputy Sheriff AB Rogers showing off the remaining arsenal left after the posse had taken their souvenirs, you can see a dent in the upper left of the receiver. In my opinion, this is the "holy grail" of Clyde weapons. Its whereabouts are unknown. After the ambush, this shotgun was forensically matched to the 16g hulls left at the Grapevine motorcycle police killings. Here is my legal length Clyde whippet Browning 16g (minus the bullet strike dent). http://pic20.picturetrail.com/VOL1324/13790650/24851870/414416077.jpg
  19. Well.... no way that anyone had a full size BAR in the front seat of the '34 Ford Sedan. It's not feasible. The three BARs were in the back seat floorboard covered by a blanket. Clyde had a Browning Auto 5 16g shotgun by his left leg and a Remington Model 11 20g by his right leg. The 1911 found in her lap was probably there for Clyde's access also. I don't doubt that Bonnie had a revolver taped to her thigh as attested to by Frank Hamer. Frank Hamer wrote a note to his friend when he gave him the pistol that said "Hold onto this. Bonnie was squatting on it". I wouldn't doubt that Bonnie may have had a Colt 1908 Vest Pocket .25 ACP in her purse as another backup for Clyde.
  20. Yes! Imagine having a 9" long 2-lb pistol like that "hidden in the folds of her dress"! Now I'm not saying she didn't have it there. She wasn't removed from the car until they towed to the Conger Funeral Home, so she may have had it hidden on her person. Adding in the .38 Colt Detective Special taped to her inner thigh, the 1911 in her lap, the Remington Model 11 20g shotgun next to her left leg, and a .25 Auto Colt 1908 Vest Pocket Hammerless in her purse... that was one well-armed 85 lb crippled redhead!
  21. Hans, There is a Colt 1911 on display in the Texas Prison Museum in Huntsville TX. It is serial number 97073 which according to the Colt website was a military configuration pistol made in 1914. It has had the "UNITED STATES PROPERTY" and "MODEL OF 1911 U.S. ARMY" ground off of the frame and slide and then nickel plated. The pistol has mother-of-pearl grips. The reported history is that it was found in Bonnie's lap after the ambush and given by Frank Hamer to his boss Prisons Manager Lee Simmons. Simmons actually traveled to Arcadia the day of the ambush and could have been given the gun that day. The Simmons family has had this pistol in their possession ever since and several years ago loaned the pistol to the museum. I don't doubt its provenance. I merely question if the current configuration is the same as when found in the car. I imagine that all of the 1911 pistols found in the Death Car were in military configuration and were those stolen from National Guard armories, including the one found in Bonnie's lap. My conjecture is that Mr. Simmons may have had the markings filed off so that it would not be viable US property anymore and then had the pistol nickel plated and re-gripped so that he would have a "show piece". It is just as likely that Frank Hamer brought the gun back to Austin, had it so modified and then given to his boss as a souvenir. I agree that Frank Hamer Jr. was not a credible witness to the ambush weapons. In addition to the mis-identified Remington Model 81 Police rifle, he also stated that there was a Winchester 1901 10g lever action sawed -off shotgun in the car. This shotgun is currently on display at the Texas Rangers Museum in Waco TX. However, this gun was not identified in the original Death Car inventory quoted by Frank Hamer to author Preston Webb in his 1935 book on the Texas Rangers. In that original list, Frank identified two automatic sawed-off shotguns, a 16g and a 20g, both of which were photographed at the ambush. Later references to this 16g was mis-transcribed as a 10g in subsequent books (i.e. "I'm Frank Hamer" biography, 1968), My contention is that Frank Jr. merely found a 10g lever-action shotgun in his dad's collection and assumed it must be the 10g that was listed wrong in the later accounts.
  22. I collect representative firearms that were used by the Barrow gang. I wanted to pick your brains about some of Clyde Barrow's weapons that were "modified". We know that Clyde had some BARs that were shortened. The Colt 1911 (1917-mfg military) that was "found on his body" has had the "United States Property" filed off of the frame dust cover. The Colt Detective Special that Bonnie had taped to her thigh had the serial number ground off. The "Bonnie 1911" (1914-mfg military) on display in Huntsville TX that was "found in her lap" has had the "United States Property" filed off the dust cover and the "Model 1911 U.S. Army" ground off of the right side of the slide and was then nickel plated. I can understand it would be pretty easy for Clyde to hack-saw off a BAR barrel and buttstock, but what about modifying pistols and nickel plating them. Were there underworld gun dealers that modified guns like this and sold them to criminals? I know that a lot of service men brought back their service guns and sometimes filed off the US property markings so that Uncle Sam wouldn't recognize them (yeah... right!). Would Clyde buy guns like this from shady dealers? Or.... did Clyde had the time or inclination to modify guns like that himself? I have heard about a "Baldy" Whatley being a underworld gun dealer to the Dallas criminals. Clyde stole so many 1911s from armories that I doubt that he needed to buy or modify them like that. I've always heard that Clyde's civilian shotguns and handguns were either bought or stolen from hardware stores. The theory that I hate to think happened is that the civilians that ended up with these B&C guns after their deaths modified them like that to erase US property identification. For example.... why would Texas Prison Supervisor Lee Simmons bother to have his Frank Hamer provided souvenir "Bonnie 1911" pistol defiled and nickel plated? Surely it was already like that when found in Bonnie's lap. I'm sure that the Yankee gangsters like Dillinger, Capone, and the Mafia had underworld gun dealers and gunsmiths, but what about the Southwestern criminals like B&C and Pretty Boy Floyd? Any knowledge or thoughts would be appreciated.
  23. Was this a special run of USMC-marked 1918A3s made by OOW? When was it made?
  24. Another John Browning design. It's amazing how many of the B&C guns are Browning designed.
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