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Incoming M2 Kit Questions


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dismed,

Make sure you buy an original US GI carbine with a non detachable spring tube. Some of the early Winchesters and all of Quality HMC guns had separate spring tubes.

Hear again I prefer US GI 30  rd mags. I have some US GI 'SEY' mags for sale at $75.00 each.

Jim C

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IMHO an original GI carbine would be the best host.

The most reliable 30-round magazines I have found are the ones, made in Taiwan or Korea, not sure where. They have a shiny black finish and are marked UU on the spine. I have found these to be FAR more reliable than originals, and a LOT cheaper. Beware of MANY other poorly made aftermarket 30 round mags.

Another area that causes problems with carbines are worn extractors and ejectors and their springs.

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Broadhead Armory story

I bought one of those Broadhead M2 kits years ago in the 1980s for $400.00. It transferred to my local C3 dealer, but when they tried to transfer it to me it was rejected. ATF would not tell me why. An ATF agent met me at the dealers to look at the kit, she took pictures of the parts, but could not tell me why they wouldn't transfer. I contacted the seller RODNEY CODY from Ohio and he would not refund my money he just said "too bad." $400.00 was a lot in those days. Still wanting an M2, I found a Winchester for $550.00, I still have it.

ANYWAY 10+ years later I see a Broadhead M2 kit for sale online. I contacted the owner and he told me the story why they were originally not transferring them. As it turns out the Broadhead Armory registered them simply as an "auto-connector" not stating exactly what firearm they were for, so people could engrave the serial number listed on the form on just about anything; UZI bolts, AR auto-sears etc. and the ATF became aware of this. After learning the ATF was finally transferring the Broadhead kits, I immediately  contacted my dealer (hoping 10 years later they were still in business and had the parts) they said yes the parts were still in their safe. Happy ending I sold the kit for $4000.00 (again years ago) So F*** you Rodney.

The kit I had the tripping lever was the registered part with a serial number engraved on it. I'm pretty sure it was BXO 38.

 

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Thanks guys.  It wasnt my dream gun but was a good price.  The other thing that sucks is the cost of ammo.  Never knew .30 carbine was so expensive.  What about the new Inland guns?  Specifically the advisor.

m2-e1654202716580.jpg

Edited by dismed
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.30 Carbine is relatively cheap, easy and economical to reload.  The cases are actually so small that handling them can be more of an issue than anything else in the process.  Plated or polymer coated bullets, either W296 or 2400, a carbide die set and you're good to go.

(I won't discuss small rifle primer prices. 🙄)

Edited by StrangeRanger
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39 minutes ago, dismed said:

Thanks guys.  It wasnt my dream gun but was a good price.  The other thing that sucks is the cost of ammo.  Never knew .30 carbine was so expensive.  What about the new Inland guns?  Specifically the advisor.

m2-e1654202716580.jpg

Which part has the serial number engraved on it?

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FWIW there's a school of thought that says that since an M2 kit will eventually trash any receiver you put it in you should get a nice original GI carbine for display purposes and a cheap aftermarket or two and beat them to death in FA.  Not necessarily recommending this because we all know that the beat to death guns have a high probability of ending up on a table at a gun show but it does make a certain degree of sense.

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10 minutes ago, dismed said:

The Winchester M2 trigger housing has the s/n.

That is the best type of registered kit. I will never wear out. Good score!

Edited by timkel
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9 hours ago, timkel said:

That is the best type of registered kit. I will never wear out. Good score!

Agree, I have the trip lever registered on mine.  No issues with it but would eventually wear out and need of repair if I shot the hell out of it.

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Ah, Ye old broadhead armory M2 kits.    Amazing what they morphed into and the players involved.   I always find it hilarious to read some of this stuff from back in the day and the shenanigans that were played and continue to some degree today.  The prices are generally discounted for a reason.

https://casetext.com/case/us-v-hunter-23

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  • dalbert changed the title to Incoming M2 Kit Questions

Seems like APEX has had a number of M2 Carbine owners contact us seeking replacement bolts.

My understanding is that the long lug on the right side cracks eventually.
Usually after discovering this failure the owners want 2 bolts!

Not too many round carbine bolts available as there used to be.

Richard

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On 11/25/2022 at 8:59 AM, johnsonlmg41 said:

Ah, Ye old broadhead armory M2 kits.    Amazing what they morphed into and the players involved.   I always find it hilarious to read some of this stuff from back in the day and the shenanigans that were played and continue to some degree today.  The prices are generally discounted for a reason.

https://casetext.com/case/us-v-hunter-23

Interesting read, George Dodson aka SUPRESS-ON (sp?) was the guy who was busted for making "pre 81" AR-15 drop in autosears after 1981.  

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13 hours ago, APEXgunparts said:

Seems like APEX has had a number of M2 Carbine owners contact us seeking replacement bolts.

My understanding is that the long lug on the right side cracks eventually.
Usually after discovering this failure the owners want 2 bolts!

Not too many round carbine bolts available as there used to be.

Richard

So here's the question:

Do the bolts crack because the receivers have been stretched? Or do they crack regardless of receiver condition?

 

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14 minutes ago, StrangeRanger said:

So here's the question:

Do the bolts crack because the receivers have been stretched? Or do they crack regardless of receiver condition?

 

I have had my M2 since 1988, never broke anything, although I wouldn't say I shot it excessively or abused it. But have done a few mag dumps 

There is a dealer in CA who sells carbine parts, who has been accused on a few sites of selling counterfeit parts including round bolts that reportedly break the right hand lug after a few hundred rounds. COULD be a source of the bolts that fail. ? 

Interesting post (not me)

http://www.uscarbinecal30.com/forum/another-riverbank-armory-george-liakos-victim_topic6368.html

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23 minutes ago, StrangeRanger said:

So here's the question:

Do the bolts crack because the receivers have been stretched? Or do they crack regardless of receiver condition?

 

I thought it was the flat bolts that were prone to cracking/failing. The later USGI round bolts were stronger and good to go. After market bolts failing, not surprising.

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I have a RR Inland M2. I have yet to break any parts, however, you always hear M2s eat parts. I run a round bolt. 

Suggestion for ammo is to load your own. I have an old Star set up in 30 Carbine. I have way too much brass & bullets bought back years ago. Have 10 M1s and the M2 to feed. 

The new Inland guns seem well made from the ones I have had come through here. Fulton Armory also makes new ones last I knew.

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