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Stevens 520 Cartridge Stop Malfunction?


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#1 snoopy2u

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 08:36 AM

I am new to this forum, hope I do this correctly! In searching links and info on my Stevens 520 - I ran into your site showing numberous Stevens 520's, and 620 shotguns. I am hoping to connect with one of these members whom can assist me.

 

Though, my 520's have long barrels, and certainly can not be termed "trench guns", they nonetheless function the same and have the same internals.

 

I have not fired a live round from my Stevens as yet, but - I have played with it enough at this point to beleive that it would operate fine under battery. with one exception - the cartridge stop lever. It is my belief that a cartridge stop would hold the next round in the tube, until the fired round was ejected, and the action brought forward to load the next round. That this cartridge stop would hold this next round via small lips on the upper and lower portion of the stop.

 

This does not happen on my 520's. When I load my magazine, the rounds protrude from the tube about 1/4 inch and rests on the lifter. I can still action, load, and eject a full magazine without problem, but - is not the cartridge stop intended to hold this next round in the tube until ready?

 

The stop has a bump towards the rear of the stop, so that when the breech/ bolt moves rearward, the bolt rides on this bump thus piviting it upward. There is also a screw in the receiver towards the front of the stop, and the stop has a bevel cut in the back of the stop, so that when the bolt rides the rear stop bump, and the stop pivits upward, it hits this screw head, and moves outward a small bit. Then the bolt is actioned forward to pick up the next round, and the stop returns downward, back against the receiver's inside wall.

 

I see this happening as i play with the action - but, no where do I see the stop holding a round in the tube. Nor, do I understand which edge of the stop is susposed to hold to round in the tube. and, of course, How the stop's piviting is susposed to function in relation to the stop's ability to retain a round in the tube and guide a round into the breech area.

 

Does anyone understand what I explained?  Given that these shotguns or old, and parts are worn, one of my 520's has a cartridge stop that appears to be well defined, sharp and should function. The other shotgun's stop is well worn - and I could swap it out with a better one, but - i'd expect that it would not operate any differently. rounds would still rest on the lifter.

 

Can one of you more knowledgeable members help me out here. And, explain the proper operation of the cartridge stop, how to fix mine, and what to look for in repairing my rifles.

 

 

Attached File  r1.jpg   135.8K   6 downloads   

 

Attached File  r3.jpg   115.19K   5 downloads

 

 

Note this cartridge stop's definition and clarity. I presume that this stop is in sufficient shape to function correctly. Breech is towards the rear of the receiver, the stop has pivited upward on the receiver's stop screw, and the stop has moved outward from the receiver. If the bolt was brought forward, the stop would pivit downward, off the stop screw and rest closer to the inside of the receiver.

 


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#2 emmagee1917

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 02:23 PM

Nothing wrong . That's how they are . Buged me , too , at first .

Chris


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#3 snoopy2u

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Posted 04 November 2014 - 03:10 PM

OK - So, you are saying that the shotgun is designed so that the next round in the magazine tube, and each round, there after, is intended to rest on the lifter? 

 

Help me again, These shotguns are a bugger to load. I have been loading empty shells for testing, and it is a pain in the rump. Does one load the tube with the bolt forward, or with the bolt to the rear?

 

Chris

Weddington, NC


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#4 emmagee1917

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Posted 05 November 2014 - 04:07 PM

I've always have had the bolt forward. Never even tried it any other way .

Chris


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#5 emmagee1917

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Posted 06 November 2014 - 11:54 AM

Ok , went home last night and loaded my 520-30 every which way and looked how every thing moved.

The tube could be loaded with the bolt both forward and to the rear .

If loaded forward , the lifter would have to be pushed up out of the way so the shell could be inserted . Once inserted and the hand removed , the lifter would return to the down position and the shell would come back over the lifter to almost the bottom of the "V" in the "Y" cut. Loading the next shell pushed the lifter up and drove the first shell back into the tube . No extreame effert was required to do so , in fact , quite easy.

If loaded with the bolt to the rear ( gun empty ) , the lifter would already be up . The shells could then be inserted directly into the tube . The shells remained totally in the tube until all 5 were inserted . Using the thumb on the base of the shell , moving it around found the " sweet spot " where the shell could be ejected from the tube into your hand . The tube was unloaded this way , then reloaded again . The slide was then run forward , locking it in place . The shell in the tube moved out onto the lifter to the bottom of the "V" in the "Y" as before. Putting pressure on the slide to release the action lock and pushing the button allowed the slide to be racked back . This caused the round to release fully from the tube and move fully onto the lifter . The next shell remained fully in the tube . At the end of the rearward stroke , the lifter lifted. The slide was run forward , chambering the round , droping the lifter , and moving the next shell partly out into it's position on the lifter again.

HTH , Chris


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#6 snoopy2u

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 11:04 AM

Chris - Thank you. And, I will try loading both ways. But - in a couple of places in your reply, you stated that the round "stayed fully in the tube". In playing with my 520, I found that when the bolt is forward, the lower ( holding the shotgun upside down) rim of a round, when loading into the tube, would catch on a portion of the bolt. Though, I do not feel this is a design feature, rather of fluke - when you mention that the round stays fully in the tube - why does it stay there? What is the round caught upon that keeps it in the tube. 

 

I have read this before on other researches, that the round rests upon the lifter as you described. That this is the design feature of loading the tube on this shotgun. But - while you are playing, you are finding that the round can actually be retained in the tube - for some reason.

 

Trying to understand if my shotguns are functioning as designed, and correctly. If i need to replace a part. What is the function of the cartridge stop, if not to stop the cartridge?

 

Chris

Weddington,NC


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#7 snoopy2u

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Posted 08 November 2014 - 11:35 AM

Chris - Just tried loading both my Westernfield and Riverside 520's. With the both forward and closed, the rounds rest about 1/4 inch outside the tube, on the lifter as you described. This was the correct operation and design feature as you stated earlier.

 

with the bolt to the rear, the lifter is up against the bolt, but - the bolt has now, in its return rearward, operated the back of the cartridge stops "hump" and has pivited the cartridge stop up, and on the forward receiver screw behind the cartridge stop, pushing out the cartridge stop from the inside of the receiver. This appears to be the correct timeing of the bolt and cartridge stop.

 

Now - since the cartridge stop has been pivioted up and outward from the receiver, the rounds had to be pushed hard past the leading edges of the cartridge stop. Once the rounds were clear of the +cartridge stop, into the tube, YES - the cartridge stop did in fact retain every round inside the tube.

 

From there, the timeing was slightly different on each of my shotguns. On one ,I had to bring the lifter down before pulling the bolt closed. The Western field operated better, in that bringing the bolt closed, the cartridge stop pivited downward, off the receiver screw, and back against the inside receiver wall. When this happened, the semi-circular cut in the cartridge stop allowed the round in the tube to feed. the lifter quickly dropsped during this bolt closing process, allowing the need round to pass by the semi-circular cut in the cartridge stop, and rest on the lifter's forward edge, as you describe.

 

This loading was easiest done with the muzzle on the ground ( not your foot).

 

I have seen multiple variations of these internals, even for the 520's.

 

While playing with my Stevens 620, I found that the trigger spring is different than on my 520's, trigger was different, bolt appeared more rounded, safety was still inside the trigger housing, and the cartridge stop was the same as my 520's, and operated the same.

 

However - many cartridge stops for the 620 are shown as a long flat peice, with a square hump. And since i do not have a 620 with the safety on the upper rear of the receiver - i do not know if the cartridge stop on these newer models operated the same as the apparent older models that i have.

 

do you know of anyone else with one of these shotguns, or does someone have a copy of a Tm9-2117 that might explain how these things were designed to work.


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#8 emmagee1917

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 02:20 PM

I did not tear down the gun to see what part did it , but there must be a means to hold the round fully in the tube to allow the lifter to move up/down when cycling. Also , when lifting the round up for feeding , the round being fed has to move from " part tube " to " all on lifter " to be lifted and the next round must be held " all in tube " to allow the lifter to lift and to keep the rest of the tube's rounds in the gun. I would guess that there is two hooks on the cartrige stop and it pivots in an arc during the feeding cycle so it takes turns holding and releasing the round. First on the forward ( in tube ) hook , the the rear ( half tube / half lifter ) hook , then onto the lifter fully ( released from rear hook , but front hook now stops the next round inside tube ) .

Chris


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#9 TSMGguy

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Posted 02 April 2015 - 11:14 AM

All correct. To remove rounds from the tube just press the lifter toward the top of the gun. 

 

The only failure mode I've ever encountered on the 520 & 620 trench guns that I own is when the slide bar has become bent, and it jumps out of the indentation in the bolt. This has been easily remedied with a little carful bending of the bar so that it engages the bolt with a bit more pressure. 

 

I enjoy these old guns from Stevens, but don't consider them to be on a par with the Winchester Model 12, or the Ithaca Model 37.  


Edited by TSMGguy, 02 April 2015 - 11:15 AM.

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