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  1. This new book has been in the works for 8 years, and as of this morning, is available for purchase on Amazon. The book's title is "The Many Firearm Designs of Eugene Reising," written by me, and published by Amazon. The foreword is by Frank Iannamico. "Thompson Printers" in Newark, OH did the cover layout. 😎 It is available at the following link: https://www.amazon.com/dp/1505541166/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?crid=27JP8SDMFHQUC&keywords=the+many+firearm+designs+of+eugene+rising&qid=1669078109&sprefix=the+many+firearm+designs+of+eugene+reising%2Caps%2C117&sr=8-1-fkmr0 Amazon is currently selling the book for 20% off the list price of $59.99, so they are $47.96 at this moment. You will not be able to get one any cheaper from me, and I don't yet have any author copies in hand. I expect to have some copies available around December 4th, and will make some signed copies available when I receive them. If you want the book now, buy it on Amazon! For the first time since my early start of the book, I read it all the way through over the weekend. It affirmed to me just how much information, and especially how much new information is included. This book will not win any artistic awards, and it's not a marvel of digital layout. It's full of collector and historical information, and hundreds of photos. It contains over 46,600 written words, plus thousands more included in letters, manuals, and vintage advertising content. It is a 350 page paperback book, in 6" x 9" format, printed in color. So, why would this new book on Eugene Reising be interesting to me? There are many reasons. It covers Eugene Reising's career from start to finish, with information gained from research and family resources, including some very surprising twists and turns The history of Harrington and Richardson Arms Co. (H&R) is covered more than in any other previously published work, including a very detailed account of the H&R bankruptcy, and subsequent activity since the original company folded in 1986 Learn about Eugene Reising's involvement with the design and adoption of the iconic M1911 pistol, while working with legendary gun designer John Browning, and stumping for the pistol with the likes of John T. Thompson If you like marksmanship, you will be impressed with Mr. Reising's proficiency, how it relates to the M1911, and how it influenced his designs Included in the book, printed in their entirety are two manuals for the MC-58 Rifle from my collection that have been virtually unobtainable - They are USMC TM-ORD-2000, and USMC SL-4-01423A - This includes a technical manual, and a stock list - This content is worth the price of the book by itself The Reising .22 Automatic Pistol is covered in great detail, which is a subject that has had very little coverage previously New information on the Reising Model 50 Submachine Gun, including a rebuttal to critics by Eugene Reising himself Reising .22 automatic rifles are covered in 4 chapters, including the Models 65, 165, 150, 151, and MC-58 - Mr. Reising's .22 rifles are the main focus of the book If you have any interest in Reising manuals, catalogs, and other paper items, they are covered extensively, as well as various accessories for the Reising pistol, submachine guns, and .22 rifles In addition to the two MC-58 manuals that are reprinted within, several instruction sheets for various Reising firearms are included You can explore many other firearms that Eugene Reising designed over the years, including a belt fed machine gun that competed with the Browning M1917 during WWI, some other submachine guns, tubular receiver M14's, the M14 Simulator, T30's, the "Guerrilla Rifle," and various other prototypes and personal firearms The book includes photos of many family heirlooms handed down by Eugene Reising and many previously unpublished photos It contains serial number data for over 460 examples of Reising .22 rifles collected over the last 8 years If you are a firearm collector, you will find interest in this book. It may even inspire you to seek more information that can expand our knowledge of the subject. I hope you will enjoy it, and if you're looking for an easy Christmas or Hanukkah present for which you can just send your significant other an Amazon link, this is a book for you. Thanks! David Albert dalbert@sturmgewehr.com
    4 points
  2. Agreed, this is straying way off base. And the attitude doesn't belong here, we don't need it.
    4 points
  3. Hi, You have an early Savage butt stock slide. It may haven reblued, maybe not. The stamped slides were only sold with the earliest Savage guns. No information is available about when the stopped stamping the slides. The number is a production number that would have matched the wood stock and the butt plate. It is not a Colt made piece.
    2 points
  4. Rebuilt 25 September, 1943 3Rd. Battalion 301St. Ordnance Regiment
    2 points
  5. I'm thinking that the results of this auction might provide a sign as to whether or not the U.S. economy is entering into a true recession and the potential for the depth of such a recession. And there's an old riddle: What's the difference between a recession and a depression? Ans.: A recession is when your neighbor is laid off, and a depression is when you're laid off.
    2 points
  6. Yeah, just think if this was applied to counting ballots.
    2 points
  7. You only have to worry about detachable stocks on guns that without a stock don't meet the 26" overall length even though the barrel is 16",like uzis ect.
    1 point
  8. Sgt. Marlin Sweetin custodian of the Springfield, Missouri Police arsenal November 29 1953. "Doesn't seem fair the department has two of these. Wonder if they would miss one of them?"
    1 point
  9. Information you seek with the exception of where serial numbers went is in the book American Thunder III by Frank Iannamico that TD. recommended. There is also an American Thunder I and American Thunder II book by Frank Iannamico. Shipping records if they ever were located would be a holy grail to find for a lot of military Thompson owners. Congratulation on your AOC Bridgeport!
    1 point
  10. Louke, Welcome to the Thompson forum. It appears to me that you have a Thompson submachine gun that was manufactured by the Auto-Ordnance Bridgeport factory in late 1941 or early 1942. Production records by serial number are not available. I am guessing you are not in the USA and this Thompson is deactivated. Please correct me if I am wrong. If in the USA, I have some good suggestions on finding out the past history. I can tell you the frame on your Thompson is from the Savage Arms factory. My guess is the frame on your Thompson has been renumbered to match the receiver serial number. The current authority on the World War II Thompson guns is by Frank Iannamico - American Thunder III. You will find a lot of information on your Auto-Ordnance Bridgeport Thompson in this publication. It appears you have a very nice example of a World War II Thompson submachine gun. Thank you for sharing pictures.
    1 point
  11. Almost certainly not. Such unit property lists are not preserved permanently, unless by chance.
    1 point
  12. I just vomited up a whole mess of grits
    1 point
  13. BSA had a sales relationship with AOC at this period, it might have been supplied to them as a sample.
    1 point
  14. Another Colt 21 in the door. This one is #4778. A really nice 21A but it looks to me that the wood may have been lightly sanded. Although the butt stock is original, the butt plate is not. Everything else looks to be correct to me. The receiver is marked "APD 431" which was the property marking for the Anniston Alabama Police Department to whom the weapon was sold to in 1927 by Moore Handley Hardware Company, Birmingham, Alabama. Pics attached for you RKI's to take apart. Your 2 cents will be appreciated.
    1 point
  15. These magazines really work but my 1918 gets really hot fast. Eric
    1 point
  16. Possible reblue theory is also backed up by the actuator looking blued... maybe just dirty though.
    1 point
  17. As long as you do not change the barrel from a 16" to the 10.5" barrel then you do not need a tax stamp. The buttstock kit has nothing to do with a tax stamp. The barrel swap does and that is classified as an SBR and you need your tax stamp then.
    1 point
  18. After many years of research and many phone calls. Greg Fox reproduced our interpretation of an FBI Monitor hard case. Here is a photo of the case with the gun in it. Greg can post other photos of the case alone, really great work on his part! Darryl
    1 point
  19. I am sorry to hear that news, RIP MIke.
    1 point
  20. Just released and available immediately on Amazon.com - The Thompson Encyclopedia - Volume 1. Yes, this is just Volume 1 of what will be a multi-volume set. I have personalized copies available for $ 135 plus $ 10 for shipping. PM me for details. If you like the Thompson submachine gun, commonly referred to as the Tommy Gun, this is a book for you. Volume 1 of a soon to be released multi-volume set of covers the history of the Thompson gun from the very beginnings, when the Auto-Ordnance Corporation was just a proposal by General Thompson to Thomas Fortune Ryan, until right before World War II. Every detail during these 20 plus years, every facet, every event, is explored in depth by several authors well known in the Thompson community. The continual research efforts and writings by Tracie Hill, William Menosky, Sutton Coffman, Patrick Jung, Ken Smith-Christmas and Tom Davis, Jr. are included in Volume 1. New stories and past articles with updated information make Volume 1 the current authority on the Thompson gun today. 500 plus pages coupled with hundreds of pictures of new information on General Thompson, George Goll, Theodore Eickhoff, Oscar Payne, E.E. Richardson and many others whose contributions made the Thompson gun the most illustrious submachine gun in the world. This is a must have book for the Thompson enthusiasts library! And remember, it is only Volume 1. More history and information on the iconic Thompson submachine gun is in the works. Volume 1 is only the beginning. You can also order through Amazon and even browse through a few pages of the new book. The Thompson Encyclopedia: Volume One: Hill, Tracie Lynn, Menosky, William G., Coffman, B. Sutton, Davis Jr., Tom, Smith-Christmas, Ken L., Jung, Patrick J.: 9798787971262: Amazon.com: Books
    1 point
  21. To bring bigger money it would have had to have original finish on both the gun and barrel, and most importantly the fluted barrel. Still a decent value in that condition IMO. .....oh, no magazine....a $29 deduct there.
    1 point
  22. It’s a good observation by Wiking. This is a close knit group and intent matters. People will pull together to help someone fix a gun with hard to find parts. But I don’t see any need to help a flipper make a profit.
    1 point
  23. First time I have seen these advetisements, thanks for posting Victor.
    1 point
  24. We all have our opinions and experience. The thing that will cause a barrel to wear faster is how hot it gets. If the temperature of your barrel gets up around 1000-1200 degrees oxygen will start to affect the steel. Barrels do not last as long when fired using lead bullets. Lead bullets are frequently lubricated and lead is much softer than FMJ and dirt and grit stick to, and/or become imbedded in the lead and have an abrasive effect on the bore. I believe this is covered in detail in Hatchers Notebook. You can put A LOT of rounds thru a Thompson barrel and it will look the same. You can't use accuracy as a guide because lets face it - nobody is target shooting with a Thompson. The thing that will tell you if your barrel is shot is when the gun starts to double or triple because you get short recoil where the bolt recoils far enough to eject and feed, but not far enough to engage the sear. My $0.02 Bob
    1 point
  25. Here in Vegas, there are ranges with MP5s,Thompsons, etc. with a over a 1 million rounds of FMJ through them and still going. Can't speak for accuracy though.... And besides the type of bullet, barrel life depends on how hot you let that barrel get. Multiple mags dumps all at once results in a very hot barrel with much faster wear.
    1 point
  26. When I was there in 2-12 IIRC. No serial number visible.
    1 point
  27. 1 point
  28. Best advice on any vintage subgun: buy a full parts kit and as many extractors and recoil springs and buffers as you can find
    1 point
  29. https://www.gunbroker.com/item/948883386 Not mine, could you just purchase this receiver, would give you perfect markings for a 1928A1 receiver, and the price is right, you could also resale it in the future.
    1 point
  30. Any of the Thompson books have pictures of these markings: American Thunder 1, 2, 3 Ultimate Thompson Colt Collectors Guide As well as many others, but I doubt I know what I’m talking about.
    1 point
  31. let me get this straight,, you want to 3D print parts for non guns ? i think your on wrong website,,,this site is about real guns,,just sayn
    1 point
  32. I have no idea what I’m talking about huh? Might wanna do a little checking into who I am and what it is I do before you start saying things like that bud. How long you been doing this? How long you been in the Thompson community? Might wanna tone down your smart ass attitude like that as it won’t get you far. I was making a point that if your business is going to be center around trying to buy and sell Thompson parts, build dummy guns, build semi auto guns using USGI parts, or a new SOT looking to crank out post sample Thompson’s, then your business plan isn’t going to go well as the parts market is drying up fast. But then again, what do I know….I’ve only been doing this for 12 years now so I’m just a moron in the Machine Gun community.
    1 point
  33. Excellent information by Colt Chopper on NO 134 and NO 135 being offered as a pair at the upcoming Morphy auction. You really need to be a knowledgeable buyer to enter the Thompson marketplace. Originality is one of the most important aspects of any Thompson gun; very good to excellent condition is another. Provenance is also very important. When you have all three, the value will usually be at the top of the market. Among other things, NO 135 does not have the original barrel. And has been refinished. All the provenance in the world will not correct those deficiencies. My advice in my Amateur's Guide book is simple: understand the products you may be bidding on.
    1 point
  34. A very interesting request. I would be very careful ordering machine gun parts from outside the USA without the advice of an attorney that specializes in import-export matters. Getting ripped off is just one of the pitfalls. Violation of US laws and regulations could be much more serious. Also, be wary of Internet advice. The parts or part kits from Royal Tiger Imports appear well used. reconbob has been selling off Thompson parts from the Doug Richardson estate on gunbroker.com. i would reach out to him and see if he would be interested in bulk pricing any of the Thompson parts. Good luck!
    1 point
  35. https://auctions.morphyauctions.com/_N__EXTRAORDINARY_PAIR_OF_VERY_LOW_CONSECUTIVE_SER-LOT551287.aspx These two have been around for sale for a few years. Maybe this time they'll find a new home. A few of us have discussed this in the past, please make note of the location where the trigger frame is marked "Semi-Automatic" on the two firearms, and compare. #134 is typical of what is seen on early Colt's. #135's marking is further forward, which is typical of those observed starting above numbers 250ish and higher. Not insinuating anything, just an observation that we discovered a few years ago while examining and discussing the very early numbers. There are exceptions to everything, and a good learning point for new and seasoned collectors. Reference page 170 of "An Amateur's Guide for the Colt's Thompson Submachine Gun"
    1 point
  36. Is on auction at Centurion this weekend. Lot number 86696 https://centurionauctions.hibid.com/catalog/404822/firearm-auction---nfa--military--collector--sporting/?q=nfa
    1 point
  37. This coming Saturday the 19th will be 12 months since they cashed the check on my Savage 1928A1 paper file form 4. Luckily the dealer I bought it from is a friend and has taken it out to 2 shoots over the last year so I could at least play with it a little. Maybe I will get it in time for Christmas?
    1 point
  38. Thanks for show us that. I'm fascinated by those miniatures.
    1 point
  39. I too was unaware he was ill. Many great times, common interests and 'shop talk' we shared over the years since first meeting him at Tracie's. We talked about him visiting and teaching me Walleye fishing and in return I'd teach him Smallmouth bass fishing. Sadly we never finalized the visit. He will be missed by all who met him. RIP Brother Mike.
    1 point
  40. Imagin this kind of service if it was in the private sector, with the kind of money that's involved, only in government. Tax dollars at work.
    1 point
  41. I HAVE A 27 WEST HURLEY WITH A 3 DIGET SERIAL NUMBER. ITS BEEN TRICKED OUT WITH ALL THE MODS DONE BY DEER SLAYER. USES ORIGINAL MAGS, REMOVABLE STOCK, SHORT BARREL, 1/2 INCH GRIP REST, EZPULL SPRINGS, SELECTOR SWITCH FOR THE BOLT HOLD BACK. LOTS OF MONEY SITTING THERE I ALSO HAVE A KHAR WITH EXACTLYTHE SAME MODS. ID VALUE MY GUNS AT AROUND 3500 EACH. BTW BOTH RUN LIKE A CHAMP
    1 point
  42. Here's a link to the Day 1 sales prices Most of the other sites do not list the Class 3 items https://www.icollector.com/Poulin-Fall-2022-Premier-Firearms-Auction_as85375
    1 point
  43. There are 22 million millionaires in the USA today. The rest of us can certainly feel their presence.
    1 point
  44. Search Poulin Auctions November 2022. I think one has to register. I was sitting there as they sold which is the only reason I know what they ended up selling for. I got my behind handed to me on just about everything I bid on. It wasn't pretty. The people at Poulin were absolutely great.
    1 point
  45. Looks like you had a nice time shooting it. Thanks for sharing
    1 point
  46. You just fill in your C+R FFL numbers in the space provided. My C+R happens to have an EIN (not normal), but one time I put the number in, they got confused so if you do, don't use it. I put N/A in those spaces where no info is available or applicable. Yes, you will be limited to a paper form filing, but it's not all that much worse than E-form 4's IMO. I've done a lot of MG transfers on my C+R. Follow the directions on the forms, do your fingerprint cards, etc. and it will go through.....at some point in the future. Best $10 a year ever spent.
    1 point
  47. Finally got around to taking a couple photos of my Manville items. I have all four versions of the rotary launchers (but only 3 hard cases). I should have a couple other items in the next month. Negotiations are on going .
    1 point
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