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Sten & Sterling Submachine Gun Reference Section


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#1 dalbert

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Posted 06 June 2009 - 01:08 PM

These materials are protected by copyright and other intellectual property laws.
Copyright 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2014 © David Albert

 

Sten Mark II Submachine Gun (David Albert Collection)

The intent of this reference page is to become the best single resource for Sten and Sterling information on the internet. It will always remain open to new content. I also want this page to serve as an online reference guide to Sten and Sterling accessories. If you have something you would like to share, please send the description and photos to David Albert at dalbert@sturmgewehr.com, and I will consider it for inclusion.

I've owned a Sten since 1988, and have collected many accessories, including a variety of manuals that I have not seen published elsewhere, and that I believe will be appreciated by the collector community. As far as the Sterling, I only have a basic knowledge, and a couple of manuals, so I will rely upon others to help me with content for that firearm.

The reference page is organized as follows:

1. Sten Submachine Gun Frequently Asked Questions
2. Sten Accessories
3. Sten Helpful Hints
4. Sterling Submachine Gun Frequently Asked Questions
5. Sterling Accessories
6. Sterling Helpful Hints

Sten Submachine Gun Reference Section

1. Sten Submachine Gun Models

Sten MK I

 


Sten MK I Submachine Gun, Serial Number 1 - This is the T40 Prototype (The "T" represents "Turpin," one of the designers) - MOD SASC, Warminster, UK (Photo by Frank Iannamico)

Sten MK II


Sten MK II Submachine Gun

[img=http://www.machinegunboards.com/forums/


Sten MK II Submachine Gun with Magazine Housing Rotated for Carrying
(Magazine is cutoff from feeding in this position)


Sten MK III



Sten MK III Submachine Gun - National Museum of the Marine Corps (Photo by Frank Iannamico)

Sten MK IV

This model of Sten Submachine Gun was apparently limited to prototype only, although rumors exist of its limited use by elite forces. Two different prototype versions exist. Of the various Sten SMG models, the MK IV's appearance differs the most.


Sten MK IV Submachine Gun, Serial Number 3 - National Firearms Centre, Leeds, UK (Photo by Frank Iannamico)

Sten MK V


Sten MK V Submachine Gun

Sten MK VI

The Sten MK VI is a suppressed version of a MK V.

(Picture to be posted ASAP)

 

Experimental Model



Early Experimental Sten, Serial Number 2 - MOD SASC, Warminster, UK (Photo by Frank Iannamico)

 

Foreign Sten Copies and Modifications


Long Branch Canadian Sten Mk II Submachine Gun modified by the Chinese for the 7.62x25mm Soviet pistol cartridge - National Firearms Centre, Leeds, UK (Photo by Frank  Iannamico)


Chinese copy of the Sten Mk II (Full auto only) - National Firearms Centre, Leeds, UK (Photo by Frank Iannamico)


Danish Sten - National Firearms Centre, Leeds, UK (Photo by Frank Iannamico)


German MP3008 - WWII copy of the Sten with vertical-fixed magazine housing and MP40 magazine - National Firearms Centre, Leeds, UK (Photo by Frank Iannamico)

Another German WWII Sten copy -  National Firearms Centre, Leeds, UK (Photo by Frank Iannamico)


Yet another German WWII Sten copy - National Firearms Centre, Leeds, UK (Photo by Frank Iannamico)


Indonesian made Sten - National Firearms Centre, Leeds, UK (Photo by Frank Iannamico)


Australian AuSten - Defence Academy of the UK, Shrivenham, UK (Photo by Frank Iannamico)

Suppressed Stens


Suppressed Mk II(S) - National Museum of the Marine Corps (Photo by Frank Iannamico)


Mk II Sten fitted with th 22.5-inch long, 2.25-inch diameter SOE type CISA suppressor - National Firearms Centre, Leeds, UK (Photo by Frank Iannamico)


Suppressed Mk 4A(S)Sten - National Firearms Centre, Leeds, UK (Photo by Frank Iannamico)


Suppressed Mk V Sten - National Museum of the Marine Corps (Photo by Frank Iannamico)

Lanchester Submachine Gun

The Lanchester Submachine Gun preceded the Sten in British inventory.  It bares a resemblance to the Lanchester, and can be seen as a simplified version designed for ease of manufacture.


Early Lanchester Submachine Gun with tangent rear sight - Private Collection (Photo by Frank Iannamico)


Early Lanchester Submachine Gun with tangent rear sight and various accessores - Private Collection (Photo by Frank Iannamico)

Cutaway Photos of Sten MK II

Many thanks to Mike - Tornado Technologies for the following photos of a cutaway Sten MK II.







"FrankenStens"

These are not official Sten models...They are modified Stens in the NFA community that I think will be appreciated by those who consult this resource.

Here is a user-friendly Sten that incorporates an FN-FAL pistol grip. It points and shoots nicely.

Above photos courtesy Trog

2. Sten History

Several resources on the internet describe the basic history of the Sten Submachine Gun, including how its name is a combination of acronyms, and that production numbers totaled approximately 3.75 million units. For me, the most fascinating thing about the Sten was how it was born of necessity during some of the darkest hours of British struggle in World War II. If you imagine your country being bombed nightly, along with the truly daunting possibility that an invasion and German occupation could occur at any time...your country is short on weapons and forces sufficient to repel such an invasion...these were the conditions under which the Sten was born. Britain procured as many Thompsons and other weapons from America as possible, but needed more guns of all kinds. Their inbound supply chain was sniped by German submarines, and a generally bleak picture existed around survival. Yet through all this, Britain was able to muster the necessary resources to prevent invasion, and the Sten played an active role in the story. Parts for the Sten were fabricated in many machine shops around the country, providing a decentralized manufacturing base for the weapon that made it less vulnerable to the results of a single, successful German bombing....(More to be added here ASAP)

3. Articles on the Sten

The following magazine articles were written specifically about the Sten Submachine Gun, or featured significant Sten content. Reading articles about the use of a firearm through the years helps provide a "snapshot" in time perspective, and can aid in understanding how certain weapons may have developed a particular reputation. The Sten is no different, and the following articles provide examples of numerous nicknames for the Sten Submachine Gun that developed through use. "Plumber's Delight," and "Cake Decorator" are two that jumped out at me.

1. Popular Mechanics, October 1943: "Machine Guns From Backyard Arsenals," by Popular Mechanics Staff Writer

2. Firepower, July 1985: "Build a Sten," (Observed online, but do not have specifics - If anyone has this issue of the magazine, please let me know the details.)

3. Gung Ho, Annual 1986: "The Bulldog's Bite: Sten Gun Still Firing In Anger," by William Seymour - Has brief history of the Sten, several accounts of combat use, as well as current (1986) use in some smaller conflicts.

4. Firepower, January 1988: "The Sten SMG: A Look From The Past," Reprint from Popular Mechanics, October 1943

5. Machine Gun News, August 1991: "Sleuthing and Troubleshooting the Sten MK II," by Al Paulson

6. Machine Gun News, March 1996: "Focus On: Building a Sten Mk V on a Registered Sten Mk II Receiver," by Carl Silver dba Select Fire

7. Machine Gun News, July 1996: "Sten Addendum," by Frank Iannamico

8. Small Arms Review, December 1997: "Sten MK II, III, & IV," by Captain Monty Mendenhall

9. Small Arms Review, December 1998: "Sten MK IV," by Captain Monty Mendenhall

10. Small Arms Review, March 1999: "Wehrmacht Sten," by Frank Iannamico

11. Small Arms Review, September 1999: "Sten to Sterling SMG Conversion," by Bob Bishop

12. Small Arms Review, January 2001: "User Friendly Solutions for Magazine Problems," by Captain Monty Mendenhall (This article has significant Sten content, covering defective magazine springs, and magazine feed lip angle measurement and repair)

13. Small Arms Review, June 2004: "Rolls-Royce Sten: The Mk5 Goes to War," by Peter G. Kokalis

14. Small Arms Review, August 2005: "Sten MKII," by Captain Monty Mendenhall

15. Small Arms Review, August 2006: "Bringing a Knife to a Gunfight? SMGs with Bayonets," by Captain Monty Mendenhall

16. Small Arms Review, November 2006: "Sten Magazine-Spring Solutions," by Captain Monty Mendenhall

17. Small Arms Review, March 2011: "Magnum Sten," by Frank Iannamico


4. Books on the Sten

The following books are written specifically about the Sten Submachine Gun:

The British Sten Manual for Shooters and Collectors, by Frank Iannamico, Moose Lake Publishing, 1997, 2000, 181 pages

The Sten Machine Carbine, by Peter Laidler, Collector Grade Publications, 2000, 370 pages

9mm Sten Machine Carbine Marks 1, 1*, 2 & 3, by Ian Skennerton, Self-Published, 1999, 48 pages


The following books contain good information on the Sten, in addition to other firearms:


The World's Submachine Guns, by Thomas B. Nelson, T.B.N. Enterprises, 1963

The World's Machine Pistols and Submachine Guns, Vol. IIa, by Thomas B. Nelson & Daniel D. Musgrave, T.B.N. Enterprises, 1980 (This book has additional information about Canadian Sten modifications, and also about suppressors.)

Les Pistolets Mitrailleurs Europeens, by Michel Malherbe, Editions Loisirs Techniques, 1985

The Owen Gun Files - An Australian Wartime Controversy, by Kevin Smith, Turton & Armstrong Pty. Ltd., Publishers, 1994 (Has some background information on the Sten's performance, and details why Australia wished to replace it with the Owen SMG.)

Weapons of the WWII Tommy, by David B. Gordon, Pictorial Histories Publishing Co., Inc., 2004 (This book has an excellent chapter on the Sten, and documents many different types of accessories. It is particularly helpful on the subject of Sten web gear. I highly recommend this book as an additional reference.)


Sten Accessories


1. Sten Manuals


The Sten Submachine Gun has seen service throughout the world, and several uncommonly encountered manuals exist documenting its service. There are multiple versions of British and Canadian manuals, to include commercial WWII Home Guard examples. Sten manuals from The Netherlands, Belgium, Norway, France, and Israel also exist.


Early British Sten Manual, February 1942:

David Albert Collection

Another Early British Sten Manual, February 1942:

David Albert Collection

British Air Ministry, Provisional Armament Publication No. 35, May 1942:

David Albert Collection

Sten Mk I, II, & III Illustrated Identification List, August 1942:

David Albert Collection

Sten Mk V Parts List, June 1944:

David Albert Collection

Small Arms Training, Volume I, Pamphlet No 22, 1942:

David Albert Collection

Small Arms Training, Volume I, Pamphlet No 22, 1942 (Canadian):

David Albert Collection

Small Arms Training, Volume I, Pamphlet No 21, 1944: (The British Sten and Thompson manuals were combined in this edition)

David Albert Collection

Small Arms Training, Volume I, Pamphlet No 21, 1944 (Canadian):

Roscoe Turner Collection

Small Arms Training, Volume I, Pamphlet No 21, 1944: (This is the 1955, updated version)

David Albert Collection (Former)

Manual of Modern Automatic Guns, by Bernards Publishers Ltd:

David Albert Collection

Know Your Weapons No. 5, Sten and Bren Guns, by Nicholson and Watson:

David Albert Collection (Former)

Sten Machine Carbine, by Gale and Polden:

David Albert Collection

Manual of the Sten Gun, by Lieutenant E.W. Manders & W. Bently Capper

David Albert Collection (Former)

The Sten Machine Carbine, Unknown Author and Publisher

National Firearms Centre Library, Leeds, UK - Photo by Frank Iannamico

The Armourer's Handbook, Part II: Machine Carbines and Pistols, by Labore, published by Gale and Polden

David Albert Collection

Dutch Sten Manual, 1943

The two Dutch manuals are very interesting to me, in that they are designated as being for the "Sten Model IV," but do not show that weapon, which was probably never used in any number. In the first Dutch manual, shown below, are drawings of the Sten MK III.

David Albert Collection

Dutch Sten Manual, 1943, Updated Version

The updated version of the Dutch 1943 Sten manual has many pasted in corrections. The drawings of the original Sten MK III are pasted over with drawings of the Sten MK II. The manual still indicates it is for the "Stenmodel IV," as can be seen on the front cover.

David Albert Collection

Belgian Sten Manual, 1944

Balder Collection


French Sten Manual, 1944


French Sten Manual, 1948

David Albert Collection

Belgian Sten Manual, 1945

David Albert Collection (Former)

Norwegian Sten/MP-40 Manual, 1948

David Albert Collection (Former)

Israeli Sten/Thompson/MP-40 Manual, 1948

David Albert Collection

Canadian Sten Service Information Bulletin, 9/3/43

David Albert Collection

Canadian Sten Manual, 1953

David Albert Collection

Canadian Sten Manual, 1953 (New "Infantry Training" series)

David Albert Collection (Former)



2. Sten Slings



Early, Non-Adjustable Sten Sling (Roscoe Turner Collection)


Mk2 Adjustable Sten Sling (Roscoe Turner Collection)

Two slings exist that were specifically designed for the Sten Submachine Gun. The first was a non-adjustable type, and the second sling, designated "Mk2," features a buckle to allow length adjustment. The non-adjustable sling was requisitioned via Catalog No. BE 8574, and the later, adjustable sling was requisitioned via Catalog No. BE 8604. Many examples are marked with their catalog numbers. Both slings are approximately 3/4" wide. A variety of manufacturers produced Sten SMG slings during WWII. Most Sten slings feature manufacturer marks with dates ranging from 1942 to 1945.

Most Sten slings are encountered with a round metal loop that attaches to a barrel shroud cooling hole. In the case of some Sten slings manufactured in India, the round metal loop was made with a blunted nail. Instead of the metal loop, some slings have a spring loaded clip.

Some observed manufacturer marks and dates include:


BAGCRAFT LTD. 1944
(Image to be posted ASAP)

BLACKMAN 1943

Blackman 1943 Markings (Roscoe Turner Collection)

C.P. LTD. 43
(Image to be posted ASAP)

D.&M. LTD. 44

D&M Ltd. 44 Markings (Roscoe Turner Collection)

FINNIGAN'S LTD 1944 (Has also been observed with 1943 date)

Finnigan's Ltd 1944 Markings (Australia) (Roscoe Turner Collection)

H.H.C. & CO. LTD. 1944

H.H.C. & Co. Ltd. Markings

J. & A.H. 1943

J. & A.H. 1943 Markings (David Albert Collection)

M.E. Co. 1943

M.E. Co. 1943 Markings (David Albert Collection)

MMC & Co. Ltd. 1944
(Image to be posted ASAP)

ROVER '45

Rover '45 Markings (David Albert Collection)

R.P. LTD. 1944 (Has also been observed with 1945 date)

R.P. Ltd. 1944 Markings

Z.L.& T. LTD. 1942 (Early, Non-Adjustable Sten Sling)

ZL&T Ltd 1942 Markings (Canada) (David Albert Collection)

Some Sten slings do not have manufacturer markings. The Enfield Rifle sling was also used in combination with an early, skeletonized Sten stock that featured a diagonal metal piece within the wrist of the stock, where the Enfield sling could be attached.

One Sten sling in my collection is painted, and the paint appears to be rubberized. If anyone has further information on this feature, please post it in the forum, or contact me at dalbert@sturmgewehr.com. At this point, I'll make the assumption that the sling may have been used in the tropics, and the paint was applied to aid in preservation and longevity in such climates.

3. Sten Web Gear

US M3 Submachine Gun Triple Magazine Pouch Rigger Modified for Sten Magazines:

Here's something you probably haven't seen before...I know I hadn't. This item has been in a collection for some time, and recently, the origin of the pouch was determined. These M3 SMG pouches were rigger modified for silenced Stens used by U.S. Special Forces in VietNam. The weapons were apparently used primarily for ambushes, and the fellow who provided their identification served with the Special Forces in Pleiku in II Corps in the Central Highlands 1968-69. The slight rust markings on the fabric match up to the Sten magazines perfectly.



(The above photos and information courtesy Roscoe Turner)


4. Sten Magazine Loaders

If ever there were a firearm that needed magazine loading tools, the Sten is the one! Trying to put the last 12 rounds into a Sten magazine without a loading tool is a frustrating exercise that will surely reduce your time on the range, and increase your ibuprofen dosage.

At least 3 different Sten magazine loader designs exist, each having their own unique method of making the loading task easier.

Pictured below is a British Sten Magazine Loader, of steel and brass construction. This seems to be the most commonly encountered design, and its official designation is "Filler, Magazine, 9mm Machine Carbine, Mk2," which was requisitioned via Catalog No. BE 8322. It is not the most intuitive device, so the following pictures are offered to help with instruction on this subject.


The loader is placed on top of a Sten magazine. It only fits one way, and has a piece of spring steel with a detent that holds it on the magazine.


The brass piece is pulled down with a finger to depress the magazine spring, and presents an opening into which a cartridge is inserted.


The brass piece is then lifted, and starts to push the cartridge into the opening in the magazine.


The brass piece is lifted to full height, and the cartridge becomes fully seated into the magazine.


The process is repeated, depressing the previous cartridge down into the magazine, while presenting the opportunity to load another cartridge, until the magazine is full.

Above images by David Albert

Here is another style of Sten magazine loader, officially known as "Filler, Magazine, 9mm Machine Carbine, Mk4." It attaches to the back of the magazine, with a small finger that holds under the lip of the back of the squared portion of the magazine top, and a spring tab that locks into the magazine locking slot. The lever is manipulated, pushing down the top cartridge, until there is sufficient room to insert another cartridge.


David Albert Collection

5. Sten Cleaning Rods

The Sten cleaning rod pictured below fits into certain Sten MKII skeleton stocks that feature holding tabs riveted inside the frame. The cleaning rod fits the contour of the stock.



David Albert Collection

Here are some examples of a Sten cleaning rod inserted into a skeleton stock featuring cleaning rod retention tabs. (This type of stock was designated "Butt, No3 Mk2.)



Above Images David Albert Collection

A brass, 2-piece Sten cleaning rod:



Above images David Albert Collection

Mk4A Pull-through type Sten cleaning device: (Marked "2800-4011-(Broad Arrow)"


David Albert Collection

6. Sten Oiler (Mk5 Oil Bottle)

A Sten oiler with a "P.H." makers marking, which I will research and update ASAP:
(My completely wild guess at this point is that "P.H." stands for "Parker-Hale," but again, that is only a guess.)




Above Images David Albert Collection

7. Sten Ejection Opening Guard

The "Guard, Ejection Opening" is a spring steel device that attaches to the Sten barrel shroud, and physically blocks the hand from sliding backwards over the ejection opening. The example pictured below is a Canadian version of the device, and is marked with a broad arrow inside of a "C."


David Albert Collection

8. Sten Bayonets

Original Sten bayonets are quite rare, since their utility was apparently questioned, and most were scrapped. A well known vendor sells a reproduction of the bayonet, and anyone considering the purchase of what is stated as an original should remain very cautious.


A rare, original bayonet for the Sten Mk II - National Firearms Centre, Leeds, UK (Photo by Frank Iannamico)


A reproduction Sten Mk II bayonet - Private Collection (Photo by Frank Iannamico)


Mk V Sten with bayonet - Private Collection (Photo by Frank Iannamico)

The Sten MkV used an Enfield Spike Bayonet:


9. Sten Ruptured Case Extractor

This tool fits into the 9mm Sten cartridge chamber when a case becomes ruptured, and is squeezed to grip the remaining brass piece, and remove it from the chamber. The tool is unmarked.


David Albert Collection

10. Sten Tools and Gauges

Sten Magazine Gauge:


A Sten magazine gauge for measuring the width of the magazine lips, and the angle and height of a loaded cartridge. - Private Collection - Photo by Frank Iannamico

Sten Magazine Mandrel:


British armorer's mandrel for removing dents from the bodies and reforming the feed lips on Sten magazines. - Private Collection - Photo by Frank Iannamico

Sten Mk III Chamber & Barrel Gauges:


British armorer's gauges for testing chamber and barrels for erosion. - David Albert Collection

11. Other Sten Accessories

A Rhodesian Sten Mk II front grip:




Foregrip on a Mk V Sten (Probably reproduction) - Private Collection - Photo by Frank Iannamico

Sten Helpful Hints

1. Disassembly and Assembly

Information about disassembly and assembly will be added soon.

2. Parts Diagrams

Sten MK II Exploded Parts Diagram:



Sten MK II Parts Diagrams from 1942 Air Ministry Manual:




Sten MK III Exploded Parts Diagram:



3. Parts Variations

Sten Bolts (Proper British name is block, breech)


MK1* - part number B3/BE 9961. Machined tripping lever recess. Mk1 does not have this feature.


MK2 – part number B3/CR 677. With the repositioning of the tripping level 1.3 inches forward to accommodate the pistol grip of the MK5 Sten a larger recess was milled along with additional cuts under the breech face. Differences in the milling near the breech face are circled.

Note: MK designation is unique to the bolt and does not indicate the MK Sten it was designed for.



The MK2 bolt can be used in the Mks I, II, III and 5 Stens.

Ref: The Sten Machine Carbine, by Peter Laidler
(The preceding information courtesy Roscoe Turner)

4. Checking Ammo for Functionality/Sear Engagement

It's a very good idea when firing a Sten to check if the ammunition you plan to use will operate the weapon as designed. I have personally experienced placing a 32-round magazine in my Sten, and when I attempted to fire a short burst, I ended up with a 32-round burst. The ammunition I was using was powerful enough to cycle the action, however it did not push the bolt back with enough force to engage the sear, so it continued to fire until empty. It is recommended to place only a few rounds in the magazine to test the ammo to see if it cycles with enough force to engage the sear, and allow trigger control, and then to proceed to full magazines, observing all appropriate safety precautions, of course.

An attribute claimed for the Sten was that it could use any 9mm Luger ammunition. While this is true, based on chamber dimensions, etc, for best performance, its not quite that simple. Stens require quality ammunition, with strong cartridge cases. The combination of advanced primer ignition, coupled with the 360 degree cone in the breech of the barrel can produce ruptures if cases are on the thin side. A ruptured case will probably produce a stoppage, which can frequently be cleared. The problem is, the bullet can lodge in the barrel, creating an obstruction, and potential for a mishap. When the gun is subsequently fired, the barrel may be bulged or burst. It wasn't until the Mk. II cartridge was established that this problem was significantly reduced. A burst cartridge case will get your attention, and appropriate safety precautions should be taken whenever firing a Sten to reduce potential for injury. (Preceding paragraph courtesy of Richard Smith)


Sterling Submachine Gun Reference Section


Nicknamed a "Stenling," this Sterling Submachine Gun was made from an NFA registered Sten tube, and a Sterling Mk4 parts kit. Private Collection (Photo by Frank Iannamico)


1. Sterling Submachine Gun Models



A Patchett Sterling Submachine Gun, stock folded - National Firearms Centre, Leeds, UK (Photo by Frank Iannamico)


2. Sterling History

(Content to be added ASAP)

3. Articles on the Sterling

1. Firepower, April 1984: "Semi-Sub Guns, Uzi vs. HK-94 vs. Sterling," by By Firepower Staff

2. Firepower, November 1984: "Sterling Para Pistol," by By Bud Lang

3. Firepower, November 1986: "P.A.W.S. for Silence...ZX7SS," by By Frank W. James (Story about suppressed P.A.W.S. Submachine Gun, a Sterling clone)

4. Guns & Ammo's Complete Guide to Full Auto Firearms, 1988: "A Sterling SMG!," by Dave Arnold

5. Small Arms Review, September 1999: "Sten to Sterling SMG Conversion," by Bob Bishop

6. Small Arms Review, May 2001: "George Patchett and his Seven Sterling Patents," by Captain Monty Mendenhall

7. Small Arms Review, January 2005: "Sound Testing the Suppressed Sterling Mk V Submachine Gun," by Doug Melton

8. Guns Magazine, July 2010: "The "Patchett" 9mm SMG: Century's Remarkable Type II Sterling," by Holt Bodinson

4. Books on the Sterling

The Guns of Dagenham: Lanchester-Patchett-Sterling, by Peter Laidler & David Howroyd, 1995, 336 pages

Sterling Accessories

(Additional content to be added ASAP)

1. Sterling Manuals

Infantry Training, Volume I, Infantry Platoon Weapons, Pamphlet No. 4, The Sub-Machine Gun (All Arms) 1955:

David Albert Collection (Former)

User Handbook, Sterling Submachine Gun, 9-mm MK4 (S.M.G. 9mm. L.2.A.3.), Sterling Engineering Company Limited, 1963:

David Albert Collection

Infantry Training, Volume II, Skill At Arms (Personal Weapons), Pamphlet No. 9, The Sub-Machine Gun (All Arms) 1975:

David Albert Collection (Former)

User Handbook for the Gun, Sub-Machine, 9mm L2A3 and Gun, Sub-Machine, 9mm L34A1 (1977):

David Albert Collection

User Handbook, Sterling Sub-Machine Gun, 9-mm. MK 4 (S.M.G. 9mm. L.2.A.3.), Sterling Armament Company Limited, 1984:

David Albert Collection

User Handbook, Sterling Para Pistol, 9mm Mark 7: A4/A8, Sterling Armament Company Limited, 1984:

David Albert Collection

Sterling Helpful Hints

(Content to be added ASAP)

These materials are protected by copyright and other intellectual property laws.
Copyright 2009, 2010, 2011, 2013 © David Albert


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