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#1 dalbert

dalbert

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Posted 28 November 2010 - 04:19 PM

---- Under Construction ----

These materials are protected by copyright and other intellectual property laws.
Copyright 2010-2011 © David Albert



David Albert Collection


jimc351 Collection

This pinned post is intended to be a collector reference guide for U.S. Combat Shotguns. Please feel free to provide your input, and any images used will have the person's name or screen name credited below the image(s). Any photos of items you would like to include may be sent to David Albert at dalbert@sturmgewehr.com.

Content will be added as it becomes available, and time permits.

History of Updates:
11/28/10: Began construction of reference section
12/30/10: Added J.Q.M.D. 1943 and Vietnam era shotshell pouches, and information on slings and bayonets
12/31/10: Was just sent an incredible number of photos of items from the impressive collection of Bob in AZ, and will continue posting until complete
1/1/11: Continuing to post photos from Bob in AZ
1/2/11: Added manuals from Charlie Flick collection, still have many more shotgun rounds to add from Bob in AZ collection
1/16/11: Added more shotgun images, still have many more shotgun rounds to add from Bob in AZ collection
2/5/11: Replaced photo of Winchester Model 12 Trench Gun, also added Win M12 Riot Gun, added another shotgun group picture, and continued to post Bob in AZ ammo photos
7/14/11: Added photo of Stevens Model 620 Trench Gun sold by Cowan's Auctions (Photo Courtesy of Cowan's Auctions Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio), also added bayonets, and more shotshells from Bob in AZ collection


U.S. Combat Shotguns Reference Post Table of Contents:

1. U.S. Combat Shotgun Models, WWI-Present (Descriptions and FAQ)
2. U.S. Military Shotgun Manuals
3. Shotgun Web Gear
4. Bayonets, Slings, & Other Accessories
5. Military Shotgun Ammunition
6. Books on Combat Shotguns
7. Magazine Articles on Combat Shotguns

U.S. Combat Shotgun Models, WWI-Present

WWI

Winchester Model 97 (WWI Model 97's were not take-down variety)
(Photo to be added ASAP)

Winchester Model 12
(Photo to be added ASAP)

Remington Model 10 (Riot Model Shown)


Remington Model 10 (Trench Model Shown)

Image Courtesy Bob in AZ

Remington Model 11
(Photo to be added ASAP)


WWII

WWI era shotguns listed above also saw service in WWII, and some were again manufactured for WWII service.

Winchester Model 97 (Trench Model Shown) (WWII Model 97's were take-down variety)

David Albert Collection

Winchester Model 12 (Riot Model Shown)

jimc351 Collection

Winchester Model 12 (Trench Model Shown)

jimc351 Collection

Winchester Model 12 (Trap Model Shown)


Remington Model 11 & Sportsman
(Photo to be added ASAP)

Remington Model 31 (Riot Model Shown)


Ithaca Model 37 (Trap Model Shown)


Stevens Model 520-30 (Trench Model Shown)


Stevens Model 620 (Trench Model Shown)

Photo Courtesy of Cowan's Auctions Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio

Stevens Model 620A (Trap Model Shown)


Savage Model 720
(Photo to be added ASAP)

Vietnam War

Most WWII era shotguns listed above also saw service in Vietnam.

Stevens Model 67
(Photo to be added ASAP)

Stevens Model 77E
(Photo to be added ASAP)

Remington Model 870
(Photo to be added ASAP)

Winchester Model 1200
(Photo to be added ASAP)

Post-Vietnam

Mossberg Model 500
(Photo to be added ASAP)

Mossberg Model 590
(Photo to be added ASAP)

M1014 Benelli
(Photo to be added ASAP)

Lightweight Shotgun System
(Photo to be added ASAP)

U.S. Military Shotgun Manuals

TM 1-1100, May 2, 1942: Shotgun and Skeet Shooting

Bob in AZ Collection

TM 9-285, September 21, 1942: Shotguns, All Types

David Albert Collection (Former)

TM 9-1285, November 25, 1942: Ordnance Maintenance, Shotguns, All Types

David Albert Collection (Former)

Ord 11 SNL T-3, 20 June 1945: Shells, Shotgun

Charlie Flick Collection

TM 9-2117, July, 1957: Field and Depot Maintenance, Winchester Riot-Type Shotgun M12, and Stevens Riot-Type Shotguns M520-30 and M620A

David Albert Collection

TM 9-1005-206-14P/2, November 1962: Operator, Organizational,and Field Maintenance Repair Parts and Equipment for Commercial Shotguns

Charlie Flick Collection

TM 9-1005-303-14, July 1968: Operator, Organizational, Direct Support and General Support Maintenance Manual Including Repair Parts and Special Tools List, Shotgun, 12-Gage, Winchester Model 1200, Riot Type, 20-Inch Barrel, W/E (1005-921-5483)

Charlie Flick Collection

T.O. 11W3-6-2-1, 20 November 1972 (Air Force): Military Shotgun, 12 Gauge, Pump Action, Model 870, with Adapter Part Number 32911

Charlie Flick Collection

U.S. Military Shotgun Bayonets

U.S Military bayonets were not specifically made for use on shotguns, however U.S. Military trench shotguns were equipped with bayonet lugs. WWI and WWII trench guns feature bayonet lugs fitting the M1917 Bayonet.

Remington Manufactured M1917 Bayonet:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

Winchester Manufactured M1917 Bayonet:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

Shotgun Web Gear

Shotgun Ammunition Belts

No government procurement documentation has been discovered yet to support the official use of any shotgun ammunition belts in U.S. Military service. Some existing examples of shotgun ammunition belts were probably intended as Navy signal flare cartridge belts. Mills made a series of shotgun ammunition belts for hunters, beginning in the 1870’s. The early Mills shotshell belts featured the Mills dog emblem on the buckle. Some examples of Mills shotshell belts with a 1905 patent date on them do not have the dog emblem buckle, and instead have a military style buckle. There is little doubt that Mills shotshell belts saw U.S. Military service, however whether they were an official item, or if they were individually procured and used remains the question today.

Mills Shotshell Belt:



Above Images David Albert Collection

Mills Shotshell Belt with Matching Shoulder Strap:


Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

U.S. Navy Cartridge Belt Mark 1, by A.L. Siegel Co. 1943: (This belt was officially designed for use with the Very Signal 10-Gauge (Flare) Pistol.)

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

M1918 Shotgun Ammunition Bags

M1918 Shotgun Ammunition Bag by Progressive, March 1918:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

M1918 Shotgun Ammunition Bag by OMO, July 1918:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

M1921 Shotshell Pouches

M1921 Shotshell Pouch marked "USMC":

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

M1921 Shotshell Pouch by Jefferson Quartermaster Depot, 1921:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

M1921 Shotshell Pouch by Jefferson Quartermaster Depot, 1921, with Additional Inspection Markings, 1922:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

M1938 Shotshell Pouches

M1938 Shotshell Pouch by Airtress Midland, 1944:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

M1938 Shotshell Pouch by Airtress Midland, 1945:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

M1938 Shotshell Pouch by Atlas Awning, 1943:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

M1938 Shotshell Pouch by Hill Shoe Inc., 1943:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

M1938 Shotshell Pouch by J.Q.M.D., 1943 (Jeffersonville Quartermaster Depot):

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

M1938 Shotshell Pouch by J.Q.M.D., 1944 (Jeffersonville Quartermaster Depot):

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

M1938 Shotshell Pouch by J.Q.M.D., 1945 (Jeffersonville Quartermaster Depot):

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

M1938 Shotshell Pouch by J.Q.M.D., 1945 (Jeffersonville Quartermaster Depot), Without Outside Pouch Markings:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

M1938 Shotshell Pouch by Rubon, Kansas City, 1942:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

Vietnam Era Canvas Shotshell Pouch:


Above Images David Albert Collection

Bayonets, Slings & Other Accessories

Specific bayonets were not designed for shotguns in military use, rather existing bayonets were used. For WWI and WWII era combat shotguns, mounts were compatible with the M1917 Bayonet.

The most common sling encountered in photos of shotguns in combat is the leather M1907 sling. All available military slings were probably used on combat shotguns at one time or another.

Military Shotgun Ammunition

Military shotgun ammunition can be categorized into two main types: Combat ammunition, and non-combat ammunition intended for instruction, hunting and sporting use. I want to sincerely thank Bob in AZ for the content he contributed to this section from his significant collection.

Combat Shotgun Ammunition

WWI Remington-UMC 00 Buck Brass Shotshells:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

WWII Remington Arms Company Inc. M19 00 Buck Brass Shotshells:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

WWII Remington-UMC 00 Buck Brass Shotshells, Marked "For Use in Hunting Small Game":

These are combat shotgun rounds that were probably marked in this manner to avoid issues with the Geneva Conventions.

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

The next 3 boxes were packaged in the standard issue government kraft boxes and marked with lot numbers. These paper 00 Buck cartridges may have been used in combat, or by defense guards at the various war time production plants. The contents were standard commercial rounds found in commercial boxes issued to the general public.

Peters Div. Remington lot numbers are in the 26000 range.
Remington lot numbers are 4-digit, and in the 5000 range.
Winchester lot numbers are 4-digit, and in the 22000 range.

WWII Remington Arms Co. 00 Buck Paper Shotshells:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

WWII Peters Division, Remington Arms Co. 00 Buck Paper Shotshells:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

WWII Western "Record" 00 Buck Paper Shotshells, "U.S. Property" Marked:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

WWII Winchester Repeating Arms Company 00 Buck Brass "Sawtooth" Shotshells:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

WWII Winchester 00 Buck Paper Shotshells:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

WWII Winchester Ranger 00 Buck Paper Shotshells, "U.S. Property" Marked

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

Non-Combat Ammunition for Instruction, Hunting and Sporting Use

Many shotshells made during WWII were consumed in aerial gunnery training, to support the critical Army Air Forces strategic bombing fronts, and also Navy gunnery. The skills employed in skeet shooting, particularly with leading and follow-through also applied to defensive aerial gunnery on bombers and ships. Many military shotguns were devoted to such training. Some shotshells with smaller sizes of chilled shot were also supplied for small game hunting and practice.

Tracer Aerial Gunnery Ammunition:

The following 3 boxes of tracer ammunition were manufactured by Remington, and issued during WW2. All contain the same cartridge. The red and white "FOR GOVT USE" is the more common box. The other two are extremely hard to find.

WWII Remington Tracer Paper Shotshells, Military Packaging (25 Rounds):

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

WWII Remington Tracer Paper Shotshells, Military Packaging (10 Rounds):

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

WWII Remington Tracer Paper Shotshells, For Government Use Only”:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

Hunting and Sporting Ammunition:

WWII Peters “Victor Trap” Paper Shotshells, #8 Chilled Shot, “U.S. Property”:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

WWII Remington “Kleanbore Nitro Express” Paper Shotshells, #7.5 Chilled Shot, “U.S. Property”:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

WWII Remington (Peters-Victor) Paper Shotshells, #8 Chilled Shot, Military Packaging:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

WWII Western Cartridge Company "Super Trap" Cartridges, #8 Shot, Military Packaging:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

WWII Western "Xpert" Paper Cartridges, #4 Shot, "U.S. Property" Steel Heads:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

Winchester Ranger "Super Trap" Paper Cartridges, #8 Chilled Shot, Military Packaging:

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

Winchester Ranger "Trap Load" Paper Cartridges, #8 Chilled Shot, "U.S. Property":

Above Images Bob in AZ Collection

Books on Combat Shotguns

The World's Fighting Shotguns, by Thomas F. Swearengen, Ironside International Publishers, Inc., 1978

Bruce N. Canfield's Complete Guide to United States Military Combat Shotguns, by Bruce N. Canfield, Mowbray Publishing, 2007

Magazine Articles on Combat Shotguns

1. Surplus Firearms, 2007: "Winchester Goes To War," by Rick Hacker (Covers the Model 1897 and Model 12 Shotguns, as well as other WWII Winchester firearms, and shows receiver markings and stock cartouches.)

2. American Rifleman, November 2009: "Remington's Model 10: 'The Other Trench Gun'," by Bruce N. Canfield

These materials are protected by copyright and other intellectual property laws.
Copyright 2010-2011 © David Albert

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