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What Am I Doing Wrong?


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#1 Gunner

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Posted 23 November 2003 - 10:56 PM

I've had my new WH 28 for almost 3 weeks now. When I got it, it appeared to have been fired very little -- a couple of boxes of ammo at most. I've fired about 1,600 rounds -- about 1,000 S&B and 600 MFS. No lead bullets, just FMJ. I just noticed today that the slots in the comp were clogging up. I've slathered the comp with lead solvents that were designed as bore cleaners -- mainly Barnes CR 10 -- and scraped and scraped the insides of the vents. I finally got some solid slivers, about 1 cm, to come off. Looked like a mixture of lead and carbon. I stuck everything I could in the vents to try to knock or scrape everything off, X-acto knive, screwdriver, etc., and still left some deposits.

I looked at an earlier thread on this topic, and most of the discussion centered on whether or not to use lead bullets and if so, which alloys, loads, etc. were best. I thought I'd be o.k. with factory FMJ. Do you guys think that the ammo I'm using is the culprit? Or is this normal after 1,500 rounds? Also, two products were mentioned, a Carters, and and a welding anti-spatter spray. Is the consensus that these are effective? If so, where can I get them? Thanks in advance.
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#2 The1930sRust

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Posted 23 November 2003 - 11:07 PM

What are you doing wrong? You're shooting it! Stop it. No shoot, no carbon build up. wink.gif

Seriously, I don't have too much trouble with the carbon, and I shoot S&B. Still, I don't whittle away it it with anything that could scratch the metal, so be careful. I have used welding anti-spatter spray before (you can order it at any auto parts store or welding supply house), but noted little effect. I think a dose of Sheath spray is just as good. I think you can get a spray specifically designed for this (forget what it is called) from Dillon Precision. I live with it. Give the gun character!
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#3 PK.

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Posted 24 November 2003 - 11:32 AM

The exposed lead in the base of a FMJ bullet will vaporize and deposit in the Cutts.

Dillon sells the Carters product and it works well; you just have to remember to use it (my problem).

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#4 PK.

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Posted 25 November 2003 - 03:24 PM

I have had a wonderful experience since I started using “total metal jacket” (TMJ) bullets. These are lead bullets with copper plating all over. No appreciable fouling at all.

Remember “Lubaloy” from Winchester (c1930)? Good ideas never die.

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#5 Ron A

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Posted 25 November 2003 - 03:37 PM

Pk suggested I use the TMJ bullets - I have seen little, if any deposts in my comp after switching. They also work in my H & K guns with the "non standard" rifleing. With lead bullets in the H & K's I used to get leading, not anymore.
Again Thanks PK.
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#6 john

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Posted 25 November 2003 - 07:18 PM

I use a popsicle stick and a tiny hammer.....tap-tap and out it pops!
(make sure you fully support the compensator!!)
The welding anti-spatter spray I use is primarily Soy oil....works good but you must respray after each 150 rounds or so. It's not a big deal to bring it to the range with you.....it'll save some work later on!
I shoot the old US spam can ammo and see alot of this. after a few tries, it gets easier!

Remember to blow out all the "dust and chunks" before you shoot again!

john
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#7 beechnut

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Posted 25 November 2003 - 09:09 PM

I have heard the same stories about using CMJ/TMJ and JHP bullets from the IPSC guys. The guys in the open catagory all run hot .38 super-comp loads. Their guns are all ported and are subject to simliar fouling in the comp.

Since I've had my TSMG, I have only noticed severe fouling when shooting LRN bullets. I shot up the last of my CMJ bullets (Montana Gold) pretty quick, so I can't speak to their fouling propensity. The last 6k rds I've loaded have been GI hardball 230gr FMJ pulls from Jeff Bartlett ( www.gibrass.com ). I have not really noticed much fouling from them, and they have the exposed lead in the back.

I intend to keep using the GI hardball pulls until Jeff runs out. Then, I'll switch back to the Montanna Gold 230gr CMJs.
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