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FAQ & Guide To Reising Submachine Gun Accessories


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#1 dalbert

dalbert

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 11:39 AM

These materials are protected by copyright and other intellectual property laws.
Copyright 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 © David Albert

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The Reising Model 50 Submachine Gun was featured on this 1945 War Bonds poster
for the 7th War Loan drive. It is the only known U.S. Government poster to feature the Reising.
(David Albert Collection)

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"Commercial" Model 50, "Military" Model 50, and Model 55 Reising Submachine Guns
Image courtesy Frank Iannamico

This is the premiere source of reference information on the internet for the Reising Submachine Gun. It is an online guide to Reising guns, and their accessories, both original and reproduction. If you have something you would like to share, please send the description and photos to David Albert at dalbert@sturmgewehr.com, and I will consider it for inclusion.

The list is organized as follows:

1. Reising Submachine Gun Frequently Asked Questions
2. Reising Accessories
3. Helpful Hints

Reising Submachine Gun Frequently Asked Questions

1. Reising Models

Harrington & Richardson Model 50 "Reising" Submachine Gun:

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The Reising Model 50 pictured above is popularly known as a "Commercial" Reising
(David Albert Collection)

The Reising Model 50 Submachine Gun was developed by Eugene Reising, and manufactured by Harrington and Richardson Arms Company in Worchester, Massachusetts. It hit the market in early 1941, and was adopted for use by the United States Marine Corps, based on its quick availability. The Marine Corps adopted the Reising because they experienced difficulty procuring the Thompson Submachine Gun, mostly because production of the Thompson had to ramp back up from an 18-year hiatus, and many of them were designated for overseas contracts, particularly to Great Britain. The Reising became adopted by many law enforcement agencies across the United States, and was also adopted for use in small numbers by the Canadian Army. A total of about 120,000 Reising Submachine Guns of all types were manufactured during World War II. Marketing of the Model 50 continued to law enforcement agencies after the war, and a couple of additional, limited production runs of the weapon were made by H&R during the 1950's.

The reputation of the Reising Model 50 was somewhat tainted by early South Pacific combat experiences in the U.S. Marine Corps. The weapon ran very well when clean, but the dirt and grime associated with Pacific Theatre combat conditions apparently led to some reliability issues. Reising parts were also not manufactured to tolerances that allowed them to be completely interchangeable. Many parts had been hand-fitted at the factory. During communal cleaning of Reisings by Marines under combat conditions, parts got mixed up, and promoted mechanical failures when the guns were re-assembled and employed. This led to a loss of confidence by some early users in the South Pacific, and subsequently resulted in some legendary acts of disposal of a number of Reisings, ordered by a unit commander to prevent their use by Marines. It has been speculated that when the interchangeability issue was discovered, absent sufficient armorer support to match up or re-fit parts, that the decision was made to destroy a large number of Reisings in anticipation of receipt of new replacements, for which greater care could have been taken to keep originally mated parts together.

The Model 50 operates from the closed bolt, and is a lightweight, highly accurate submachine gun. Its accuracy easily exceeds that of a Thompson, as well as other open-bolt submachine guns, and is controllable during full auto firing. For an NFA enthusiast, the Reising Model 50 is a relative bargain, and a collectible U.S. Martial arm of considerable firepower.

Harrington & Richardson Model 55 "Reising" Submachine Gun:

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Above 3 images courtesy Frank Iannamico

The Reising Model 55 Submachine gun is a shortened version of the Model 50, designed for U.S. Marine Corps paratrooper use. The weapon has a 10 1/2" barrel with no compensator, as well as features a folding wire stock with a pistol grip. All of its operational characteristics are the same as the Reising Model 50.

Harrington & Richardson Model 60 "Reising" Semi-Automatic Rifle:

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Image courtesy Frank Iannamico

Harrington & Richardson manufactured approximately 3500 Reising Model 60's, which were a semi-automatic version of the Model 50, with a longer barrel, making it a Title I firearm. Most were issued to guard units for service within the United States.

2. Military vs. "Commercial" Reisings

While the Reising Submachine Gun was never represented by its manufacturer as either a "Commercial," or "Military" Reising, such are the popular terms that many use to describe them. A "Commercial" Reising is usually one of the earlier manufactured weapons that is blued, and features either a 28 or 29 fin barrel. The "Military" Reising is usually parkerized, and has a barrel with 14 fins. The presence of such features does not hold absolutely true for either type, but they are generally accurate descriptions of the basic differences. There are also differences noted in rear sights, front sights, takedown screws, trigger guards, selector switches, and internal features that differentiate them.

3. Harrington & Richardson .22 Caliber Rifles Related to the Reising Submachine Gun

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An early H&R advertising matchbook for the new "Reising" .22 Automatic Rifle.
(David Albert Collection)

Eugene Reising designed several .22 LR rifles for H&R based on his Reising SMG design. All .22's were semi-automatic, and several names and design changes were associated with the various models listed below. The rifles came into existence because the Marine Corps wanted a .22 training rifle for the M1 Garand. Further details and pictures of each model will be added as time allows.

"Reising .22" - Original Test Rifle for Model 65 Marine Corps Production - This is the original 1943 test rifle for production of the Model 65. It has a vintage tag on it that is difficult to read in places, but indicates that 80,000 rounds were test fired through it, plus 20,000 at the factory. The tag, dated 1944, indicates that it is the original 1943 test rifle, and property of H&R, and to “Hold for Instructions.” Comparing it to a production Model 65, the buttplate is a plain piece of sheet metal, versus the stamped production metal buttplate. All markings are hand stamped. Serial number is a single letter. It does not have the H&R rollmark that production Model 65’s have…only “Reising ..22” hand-stamped on the side. “Safe” and “Fire” are also hand-stamped. The magazine is hand-stamped with “10” on it to indicate capacity, and does not feature the company markings of production magazines. The trigger guard appears to have been hand finished, versus the slightly rougher stamping on the production model. The safety knob is spherical, rather than pill shaped with flattened sides on the production models. The barrel has lathe turning marks on it. This is the rifle the Marine Corps used to evaluate the Model 65 design as a .22 trainer for the M1 Garand Rifle, which resulted in the subsequent production of tens of thousands of rifles of the Model 65 design and its descendants.

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David Albert Collection

Reising Model 65 (New Military Model) - Most Model 65's were made as training rifles for the Marine Corps, and a small number are marked to indicate so (post-production), however most have no military markings whatsoever. Marine issued Model 65's are usually encountered in very worn condition due to extensive training use. Their finish is a very light parkerized type that is unique to the Model 65, and has sort of a greyish-green coloring. Model 65's were also sold to civilians until they were replaced by the 165/150/151 models, which were made especially for the civilian market. Reising Model 65's were manufactured from 1943 to 1945. In May, 1945, production transitioned to the Model 165.

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David Albert Collection

Reising Model 65 (Specially Marked and Upgraded to National Match Specifications by USMC) - A very small number of Reising Model 65's were modified for National Match use. The example in this website owner's collection is scoped, and marked "USMC" and "NM" on the left side of the receiver. It has a crowned bull barrel with no front sight.

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David Albert Collection

"The General" (Reising .22 Caliber Automatic Rifle) - This was the .22 caliber Reising Model 65 that was marketed commercially during World War II. None of the rifles were marked as "The General," but Harrington & Richardson advertisements of the WWII period featured the nickname, and the rifle was also featured in an advertisement at the back of the 1943 version of H&R's Reising Model 50 Submachine Gun manual.

Doug Moretz' collection includes a full set of original paper items that accompanied a WWII purchased Reising Model 65 "The General" rifle. The various items can be seen at the following links, and include a wartime H&R letter explaining the unique rifle, it's limited wartime availability, and the changes that were projected after military production ended. Also included are several items associated with the Redfield Model 70-AT aperture sight included on the rifle.

Wartime H&R Letter to Accompany Reising Model 65 "The General" Rifle

H&R Reising Model 65 Care and Use Content Envelope

H&R Model 65 Instructions for Loading and Firing

H&R Flyer for Redfield Sight on "The General" .22 Rifle

Redfield Sight Guarantee & Instruction Envelope

Redfield Instructions for No. 70-AT Sight Mounted on H&R Reising "The General" .22 Rifle

Redfield Guarantee Card
Above Images Doug Moretz Collection

Below is link to a component part listing for the "General" Model 65 .22 Caliber Semi-Automatic Rifle, published in an August 1953 H&R Components Parts Price List. (Notice that it was listed as a discontinued model at that time)

"General" .22 Caliber Semi-Automatic Rifle Component Parts Price List, August 1953

Model 165 "Leatherneck" - The Model 165 is a lightened Model 65 with a 10-round magazine, and is marked with the "Leatherneck" nickname. H&R began using plastic trigger guards on the Model 165, and the rifles have a blued finish. The example shown below has the rear sight removed, and a scope mounted. The Model 165 began production in May, 1945, and probably ran until about 1952. This information is based on a 1945 letter from H&R describing the transition to the Model 165, and also on a 1953 H&R catalog that indicated the model had been discontinued.

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David Albert Collection

"Leatherneck" Model 165 Component Price List from August 1953 H&R Publication (Model was discontinued)

Model 150 "Leatherneck" - The Model 150 is similar to the Model 165, except that it has a 5-round magazine. It features basic iron sights. The price for the Model 150 listed in the H&R October 1, 1949 Consumer Price List was $49.50.

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David Albert Collection

Model 151 "Leatherneck" - The Model 151 is a Model 150 with an upgraded Redfield aperture sight. The price for the Model 151 listed in the H&R October 1, 1949 Consumer Price List was $53.50.

"Leatherneck" Models 150 & 151 Component Parts Diagram and August 1953 Price Listing

Model MC-58 - The Model MC-58 is the same as a military Model 65, except that the safety is located on the front of the trigger guard, functioning like the safety on M1 Garand and M14 Rifles. It has a dark parkerized finish. The rifle began use in 1959, probably initiated due to the adoption of the M14 Rifle.

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Model 700 - This Harrington and Richardson .22 Magnum caliber rifle is a distant relative to the Reising Submachine Gun, and other Reising related .22's. It is semi-automatic, however it does not utilize the Reising underlever (action bar) cocking design.

4. Reising Magazine Types

Original Reising .45 magazines hold 20 rounds, and another original version holds 12 rounds. Both are stamped with Harrington and Richardson markings, as well as indicate they are for the Reising. A 30-round aftermarket magazine also exists, as well as a 50-round aftermarket drum, which is a Thompson drum that has been modified with the top of a Reising magazine attached. Some Thompson box magazines have also been modified to work in the Reising, and hold 23 or 25 rounds. I will post pictures of these as soon as I can. (If anyone has a picture of the aftermarket 50-round drum, or modified Thompson mags, please forward them to me for inclusion.) Some 12 and 20 round Reising magazines have "NE" markings, followed by a number. These were made by New England Small Arms, which consisted of several manufacturers.

The following two pictures show 3 different .45 ACP Reising magazines from different angles. From top to bottom:
1. 12-round .45 ACP magazine - Can be easily identified by the indentations in the magazine housing to enable single stack feeding. These magazines also have flat followers.
2. Original 20-round .45 ACP magazine - Note the difference in the shape of the follower, to enable staggered row feeding of cartridges.
3. After market 30-round .45 ACP magazine made by Ken Christie.
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Above Images David Albert Collection

Example of Harrington and Richardson stamping on a 12-round .45 ACP magazine:
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David Albert Collection

A company is producing reproduction 20-round magazines for the Reising. They are marked similarly to the originals, but they read as follows:

H&R - Reising
Model 50 - Cal . 45 Magazine

5-Round & 10-Round Magazines for Reising .22 LR Rifles:

The Models 65, 165, and MC-58 were supplied with 10-round magazines, and the Models 150 and 151 were supplied with 5-round magazines. Both magazines are interchangeable with all Reising .22 LR rifles. 10-round, .22 LR Magazines were manufactured with both a parkerized, and a blued finish, while the 5-round magazines were manufactured with a blued finish.

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David Albert Collection


5. Articles on the Reising

Many articles have been written on the Reising, beginning in 1941. These articles are helpful in documenting the history of the weapon, as well as provide much useful collector information. Some of the articles also help provide a better understanding of the sources of many misperceptions and (actual or perceived) shortcomings of the Reising. Here are the magazine references for the articles:

1. Army Ordnance, January-February, 1941: "The H&R Reising Submachine Gun," by Lt. Col. Calvin Goddard (A note of interest regarding Calvin Goddard - He set up the crime lab at Northwestern University in Chicago immediately following the St. Valentine's Day Massacre in 1929, and developed many of the firearms forensic techniques used by law enforcement since that time. He wrote many small arms articles throughout his career.)

2. Business Week, January 18, 1941: "Private Sub-Machine Gun," by Business Week Staff Writer (A brief summary with a picture of Eugene Reising blindfolded, disassembling a Model 50 Reising Submachine Gun, which the article indicates H&R began to manufacture privately "on faith" that it might contribute to the U.S. Defense effort.)

3. Popular Science, April 1941: "Latest Submachine Gun is Designed for Mass Production," by Popular Science Staff Writer

4. American Rifleman, May 1941: "M-65 H&R Training Rifle," by F.C. Ness (Appears in "Dope Bag" section)

5. Steel, ??, 1941: "The Reising Submachine Gun," by Arthur F. Macconochie (Was reprinted in Steel's special edition "Modern Small Arms" digest of 15 small arms related articles from the magazine's pages in 1941)

6. Fur-Fish-Game, August 1941: "New Reising Submachine Gun," by Fur-Fish-Game Staff Writer

7. Leatherneck, September 1942: "The Reising Submachine Gun"

8. Mechanix Illustrated, October 1942: "Sky Dynamite," by Mechanix Illustrated Staff Writer, photos by Rudy Arnold (This short article covers Marine Paratroopers, and while not specifically about the Reising, the Model 55 is prominently mentioned, and pictured 6 times within the article, as well as featured on the cover.)

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David Albert Collection

9. Machinery, January 1943: "Producing the Reising Gun," by Holbrook L. Horton (This article begins with an H&R slogan, "The Reising Gun will Lick the Rising Sun.")

10. Hunting and Fishing, February 1943: "Reising Gun Defies the Rising Sun," by Hunting and Fishing Magazine Staff (Short article summarizes the Reising and its inventor.)

11. American Rifleman, February 1943: "The Reising Submachine Gun," reprinted in condensed version from "Leatherneck" magazine

12. Gun World, ??, circa 1960: "What Went Wrong with the Reising Gun," by William B. Edwards (Have photocopy of article with no date, but subscription ad lists address with no zip code, so probably from very early 1960's, judging by comments in article. If anyone can confirm issue date, it would be appreciated.)

13. Guns, ??, 1975: "The Short-Lived Reising," by Col. Robert H. Rankin

14. Combat Illustrated, June 1976: "The Reising Gun: A Matter For Contention," by Major Jack Lewis, USMC

15. Guns Illustrated, 1978: "It's A Bear!," by Charles W. Walker (Article covers the life of Eugene Reising, and focuses on 1920's Reising Arms Company .22 pistols.)

16. American Rifleman, June, 1983: "Harrington & Richardson Model 65 'Reising'"," by Edward A. Tolosky (This is one of the "Exploded Views" features in the magazine that briefly covers history, and has disassembly instructions and a parts diagram.)

17. The Phoenix Exchange, Spring/Summer, 1987: "The Reising Revisited" by Riley Diana (This magazine is no longer in business, and was similar to today's "Military Trader". Mr. Diana has agreed to let a copy of the article be posted here, and it can be accessed at the link below: (Updated 5/22/11)

http://www.sturmgewe...cle1987_Web.pdf

18. Machine Gun News, August 1994: "Reising M50: The Gun No One Wants," by Russell A. Williams (This article casts the Reising in a very negative light)

19. Machine Gun News, November 1994: "An Up-Reising!," by Frank Iannamico (This article casts the Reising in a very positive light, and serves to rebut some of the statements made in the Williams MGN August '94 article)

20. Machine Gun News, December 1995: "Reising Re-Thought," by Russell Willams (Williams re-thinks his approach used in the August 1994 article after significant feedback, Frank's rebut article, and also after firing 1200 additional rounds through his Reising. He decides it has some character, and concludes that its positives probably equal its negatives.)

21. Machine Gun News, December 1995: "Magazine Release for M50 Reising," by Frank Iannamico (This is a short, boxed feature within Williams' article in the same issue, and it describes a replacement magazine release for the M50)

22. American Rifleman, April 1996: "H&R Reising SMGs," by Bruce N. Canfield (7-paragraph summary featured in Q&A section)

23. Small Arms Review, July 2000: "H&R Reising Model 60 Carbine," by Frank Iannamico

24. Small Arms Review, September 2000: "The Reising Model 50 Submachine Guns" by Frank Iannamico

25. Small Arms Review, October 2000: "The Reising Model 50 Submachine Guns, Part II" by Frank Iannamico

26. Small Arms Review, December 2000: "The Model 55 Reising," by Frank Iannamico

27. Small Arms Review, July 2005: "H&R Reising Submachine Gun Manuals," by David R. Albert (This was my first published article for SAR)

28. ArmyTimes.com, May 15, 2006: "The lore of the Corps: Reisings found to be unreliable in combat," by Charles A. Jones (Article may be accessed at the following URL: ArmyTimes.com Reising Article)

29. Small Arms Review, January 2007: "Full-Auto Reising Model 65," by Captain Monty Mendenhall (Story of Max Atchisson's M65 .22 rifle full-auto conversions)

30. American Rifleman, April 2007: "The Short End of the Stick? The Reising Submachine Gun," by Bruce Canfield

31. Small Arms Review, April 2007: "Rescued Reising!," by Lawrence Heiskell (An account of a Reising that was about to be destroyed by a PD, but the transferable paperwork was found by ATF.)

32. Small Arms Review, August 2007: "Reising Star: A Buyers Guide to Reising Submachine Guns," by Frank Iannamico (Great article with many color pictures and examples of differences between Reisings -- this is a "must have" Reising magazine article.)

33. Shotgun News, November 19, 2007: "Not Quite Reising to the Occasion," by Peter Kokalis (This article is extremely negative towards the Reising, and has some factual errors, such as stating that 20,000 Reisings were produced during WWII, while the actual number is 5 to 6 times Kokalis' figure. - He also stated that the Model 60 Semi-Automatic Reising Carbine was manufactured to compete with the Model of 1927 Semi-Automatic Thompson, when, in fact, they were not even on the market at the same time.)

34. Small Arms Review, July 2008: "The U.S. .45 Model 50 and 55 Reising Submachine Gun and Model 60 Semiautomatic Rifle," by Robert C. Ankony, PhD

35. Guns, March 2010: "The .45 ACP in World War II," by Mike "Duke" Venturino

36. WWII Ordnance Illustrated, Spring 2010: "The Reising Submachine Gun: America's unknown, unloved machine gun," by Lt. James L. Ballou

37. Small Arms Review, April 2011: "Notes on the Reising Submachine Gun, Part I," by Frank Iannamico

38. Small Arms Review, May 2011: "Reising Notes, Part II," by Frank Iannamico

6. Books on the Reising

If you have any interest in Reisings, there are 2 books you MUST have in your library. Both books are written by Frank Iannamico. The first is "Reising Submachine Gun Story," and the second is "Submachine Guns of the United States of America." Both can be purchased at the following link:

http://www.machinegu...com/index2.html

Bruce Canfield's 1994 book, "U.S. Infantry Weapons of World War II," has 8 pages of general coverage, plus another page of collector notes on the Reising Models 50 and 55.

Alec S. Tulkoff's book "Grunt Gear - USMC Combat Infantry Equipment of World War II," is another book that has several pages devoted to the Reising SMG, and also features a photo of many Reising M55's in their original boxes, lined up on a shelf, with their serial numbers marked on the end of each box.

Another book exists that contains some additional information on the Harrington & Richardson Reising Model 65 and MC-58 .22 caliber military training rifles. The book is titled "U.S. Martial .22RF Rifles," by Thomas D. Batha. This is a 102 page paperback with 5 pages on the subject. It is still in print, and available from the large online booksellers, and is also sometimes encountered for sale at gun shows. Information contained within this book on the Model 65 demonstrates some inaccuracy.

Reising Accessories

1. Federal Laboratories Reising Hard Cases

The Federal Laboratories Reising Submachine Gun case is a very desirable accessory for any Reising collector. Federal Laboratories was based in Pittsburgh, PA, and distributed law enforcement equipment such as tear gas, gas guns, billie clubs, riot gear, sirens, emergency vehicle lights, Thompson Submachine Guns from about 1934-1940, Reising Submachine Guns, and cases to transport much of their police equipment. The company still exists at a different location today. The picture below shows an excellent condition example of their Reising Submachine Gun case. Cases will be encountered with both blue and black felt interiors.

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The Fed Labs cases are very sturdily built, using over 200 rivets, and metal corner pieces. The weakest part of the case is the handle. Surviving examples are also often encountered with damaged, loose, or missing gun positioning blocks, as well as peeling felt, all of which are can usually be repaired. Prices as of October 2008 usually range from about $500 to $1100, depending upon condition.

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Federal Laboratories sticker found on their Reising Hard Cases:

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Above Images David Albert Collection

2. Reising SMG Soft Case

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David Albert Collection

3. Reising Front Sight Wrench & Envelope

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4. Reising Paper Items (Manuals, Catalogs, Advertisements)

1941 Advertisement for Reising Model 50 Submachine Gun:
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David Albert Collection

Earliest Known Reising Submachine Gun Flyer, 1941:
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David Albert Collection

Earliest Known Reising Submachine Gun Manual:
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David Albert Collection

A 1941 Reising Submachine Gun Advertisement:
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David Albert Collection

Here is the 1941 Reising Submachine Gun Manual that was featured in the advertisement above:
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David Albert Collection

This is a manual printed at the direction of the War Department at Springfield Armory in August, 1941. It is only 6 pages long, and is now the first known military manual for the Reising. (Added 12/19/11)


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David Albert Collection

A 1942 H&R Reising Submachine Gun Manual - These were advertised in many WWII era magazines, with H&R offering them for free as a way to keep the H&R name in the public eye during the war effort, in hopes that civilians would purchase H&R firearms after the war.
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David Albert Collection

A 1942 Spanish Language H&R Reising Submachine Gun Manual:
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Doug Moretz Collection

An example of a 1943 H&R Reising Submachine Gun Manual with the Army/Navy "E" Flag Sticker attached:
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David Albert Collection

Two examples of Harrington and Richardson Envelopes used to mail 1942/43 Reising Manuals:
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Above Images David Albert Collection

Marine Corps Weapons School Descriptive Reising Manual, May 1942: (This is a hand-typed, military manual for the Reising)
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David Albert Collection*

Reising Submachine Gun General Data Manual:
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David Albert Collection

Marine Corps Ordnance School Reising Submachine Gun Manual:
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David Albert Collection

Marine Corps Reising Submachine Gun Manual:
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David Albert Collection

Harrington and Richardson Army-Navy "E" Award Program and Promo Material for Reising Submachine Gun:
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Image courtesy Frank Iannamico

Canadian Army Service Information Bulletin for Reising Submachine Gun, September 3, 1943:
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David Albert Collection

Reising Model 50 Submachine Gun Manual, 1951:
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David Albert Collection

"For Distinguished Service" Reising Submachine Gun Flyer, 1951:
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David Albert Collection

H&R "Leatherneck" Model 165 .22 Caliber Rifle Flyer, 1945:

This flyer was mailed with a letter from H&R dated May 17, 1945 indicating that the Model 165 "Leatherneck" Rifle had been announced in trade papers, and price was still to be determined. The back of the 4-page flyer featured an arrangement of newspaper clippings touting the service of the Reising Submachine Gun.

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David Albert Collection

Model 65 Instruction Sheet Envelope:
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H&R Protection Equipment Catalog, Undated (Probably late 1940's):
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David Albert Collection*

TM-ORD-2000, Marine Corps Maintenance Manual, Rifle, Cal. .22 Long Rifle - MC-58, October 1958:
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David Albert Collection*

SL-4-01423A, Marine Corps Stock List, Rifle, Caliber .22, MC-58, December 1959:
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David Albert Collection*

H&R Law Enforcement Protection and Recreation Equipment Flyer, September 1961:
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David Albert Collection*

5. Reising Web Gear

A 3-cell canvas Reising magazine pouch was procured by the Marine Corps for use with the Reising during World War II. These are very rare collector items. International Military Antiques sells a reproduction 3-cell Reising pouch, which is pictured below:

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Above Images David Albert Collection

A 5-cell, USMC marked Reising 20-round magazine pouch was also issued. At a glance, this pouch appears very similar to a Thompson 5-cell XX magazine pouch. Reising magazines fit in Thompson pouches, however the flaps will not close. All examples observed of Reising 5-cell, USMC marked magazine pouches bear the date of 1942, which can be seen in the picture below. The USMC marking, and 1942 date are the easiest characteristics to use in identification of a Reising 5-cell magazine pouch.

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Note the subtle differences between the Reising pouch, and the Thompson pouch. The male portion of the Reising pouch snaps are located on a webbing strip that is higher in comparison to the same feature on a Thompson pouch.

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Above Images David Albert Collection

The U.S. Marine Corps issued a paratrooper carrying case for the Model 55 Reising. This is probably the scarcest, and most expensive Reising accessory to be found. Here is a picture of one from that came from the former Harrington and Richardson museum.

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This picture shows the size of the Model 55 in comparison to the case. (This Model 55 is the former Harrington and Richardson museum gun.)

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This item is officially know as a "Holster, Reising Gun," and is more popularly known as a "Jump Case." It is a Marine Paratrooper case to hold a Reising Model 55 Submachine Gun. Here are photos of two different examples:

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6. Reising Slings

The subject of Reising slings is one that has some ambiguity, as well as some specifics. M1 Carbine slings were used on Reisings, and have a very similar appearance to official Reising slings. Many reproduction M1 Carbine slings exist on the market, so one should examine their characteristics closely if an original M1 Carbine sling is desired. Also used on Reisings in its various roles were leather and canvas slings existing in military and police inventories. A sling designed specifically for the Reising came into service with the U.S. Marine Corps in 1943. It is a mustard colored sling that looks like an M1 Carbine sling, but is marked "U.S.M.C." and "Boyt -43-" close to the lift-the-dot snap. The main difference between the Reising sling and the M1 Carbine sling, besides markings, is that the Reising sling, when placed on the weapon, has added space between where the sling loops through the front sling swivel, and the lift-the-dot snap. This allows the use of a second keeper for retention, if desired, based on feedback from Marines about the tendency of the lift-the-dot snap to sometimes unsnap.

Special Note, 2/4/10: A reproduction Reising sling is currently on the market, being sold on Ebay as an M1 Carbine and "Riesling" (sic) sling. Although the seller does not know how to spell the name correctly, this sling does appear original at a glance. I have obtained one, and a picture of it is featured in comparison to an original below. The sling is marked the same as the original in the picture below, however it is a light yellowish color instead of the darker mustard color of the original. If you are familiar with the Kerr/NoBuckl 1914 slings, and the shorter, mustard color Thompson slings of WWII, the color of the original is the same, while the reproduction is much lighter colored. The reproduction is also approximately 3 1/2" longer than the original. Originals are about 42" long, while the reproduction slings are about 45 1/2" long. The "D" end tabs of the original appear to have been swaged, and the reproduction tabs appear to have been placed in a press, and then pounded, and are also not as uniformlyshaped as the original "D" end tabs.

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David Albert Collection

7. Reising Cleaning Rod

The Reising cleaning rod is made of 1/4" steel wire, and measures 22 15/16" in length. The tip is 1 13/16" long. The loop handle is 1 11/16" wide, and 1 3/4" long to where the loop end stops. There are no known reproductions, however one person is considering reproducing the Reising cleaning rod in the future.

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Above Images David Albert Collection

8. .45 ACP Ammunition Specifically for Reisings

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The Dairt Co. of New York, NY manufactured ammunition specifically for use in Reising Submachine Guns. A statement to this effect is featured on both the long sides of the Dairt ammunition boxes. The bottom of the Dairt boxes are blank, except for a lot number stamp.

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Many Dairt .45 ammunition boxes encountered today have pasteover labels on both of the long sides of the box to indicate they contained reloaded ammunition. This was probably a result of the War Production Board (WPB) controls during World War II, and the fact that most new production ammunition was allocated to national defense. Federal Laboratories sold reloaded .45 ACP ammunition, probably including the Dairt brand. On July 17, 1943, War Production Board Limitation Order L-286 released reloaded ammunition for open sale.

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The box below features one side where the reload label has been removed at some point in its life. Underneath, the original statement regarding the Reising can be seen.

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Above Images David Albert Collection

This Remington Kleanbore ammunition was specifically designed for use in several .45 caliber weapons, including the Thompson Submachine Gun, and the Reising Submachine Gun.

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Above Images David Albert Collection

Helpful Hints

1. Broken Firing Pins

Broken firing pins are probably the most commonly encountered issue with Reisings. PaulF on this board posted an excellent "How To" regarding a solution to this problem. The post may be found at the following link:

http://www.machinegu...?showtopic=8854

2. Compensator Fin Breakage

Unfortunately, the metal fins in the Reising compensator are thin, and prone to breakage during firing. At least one person has designed a device to cover the compensator, and prevent the fins from breakage, but the device causes some cosmetic damage to the compensator itself. Here are some pictures of the device made by jim c 351. The last picture shows one of the two retaining screws that insert between the compensator fins to prevent slippage.

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3. Disassembly and Assembly

Disassembly photo sequences from the 1942 H&R Reising Manual can be viewed at the following link:

Field Disassembly: (Once image has loaded, click on it for finer detail.)

http://www.sturmgewe...sassembly-1.jpg

http://www.sturmgewe...sassembly-2.jpg

http://www.sturmgewe...sassembly-3.jpg

Detailed Disassembly and Assembly: (Once image has loaded, click on it for finer detail.)

http://www.sturmgewe...sassembly-4.jpg

http://www.sturmgewe...sassembly-5.jpg
Above Images David Albert Collection

4. Military Troubleshooting Guide

The following is a charted excerpt of troubleshooting tips from "The State Defense Force Manual," which was published from 1940 to 1944 for use by various State National Guard units. The versions of the manual from 1942 to 1944 include a section on the Reising Submachine Gun. Please keep in mind, these instructions were intended for military armorers. Please exercise extreme caution should you attempt any of these repairs, and understand that you do so at your own risk.

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* I would like to acknowledge the late Jeff Reising, and his family for the opportunity to acquire Jeff's collection of Reising paperwork in early March, 2011. The items will add to the study of the various Reising firearm designs, and my intent is to make much of the content available for others to see through this website. If an item is noted with an asterisk next to "David Albert Collection," it originated from the late Jeff Reising's collection of paperwork.

These materials are protected by copyright and other intellectual property laws.
Copyright 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 © David Albert
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