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What The Heck Is This?


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#1 rfguy1984

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Posted 26 November 2003 - 03:02 PM

http://www.westernfi.../thompson/j.htm

Is this a FA registerd blank? New one on me...
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#2 LIONHART

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Posted 26 November 2003 - 03:29 PM

From what I understand, not too many of those were manufactured prior to the 1986 Machine Gun Ban. It's a Special Firing Pin for a Semi-Auto Thompson. Once installed, it would allow Fully Automatic Fire, and Safe only. No Semi-Auto.
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#3 Incomplete

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Posted 26 November 2003 - 03:30 PM

Would it be concidered over priced?
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#4 John Jr

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Posted 26 November 2003 - 03:32 PM

There are some states out there that wont allow a select fire weapon. They only allow Full Auto Only. This has to be one of the dumbest things I have ever heard of, but there are states like this out there.

I think that is what Nick means in his ad.

Jr

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#5 Bill in VA

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Posted 26 November 2003 - 04:25 PM

Sort of OT, but John, Jr. mentioned some states allowing full-auto only. Connecticut is one such state that allows machineguns as long as they are full-auto only.

As I understand it, at least in regards to Connecticut, they worded the law to prohibit any "select-fire" firearms. Their intention was to ban machineguns, but some enterprising, 2A-friendly fellow noted the wording of the CT law, argued semantics, and won since "select-fire" means capable of both semi- and full-auto.
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#6 WEllin11

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Posted 26 November 2003 - 08:33 PM

Is this legal? If it is, it would appear to be an inexpensive way of owning a FA weapon. What is "The rest of the story"?
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#7 Bill in VA

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Posted 26 November 2003 - 11:26 PM

Is this legal? The ad states, "This registered machine gun parts, allows legal conversion to full-auto fire in a semi-auto model 1927 Thompson." Based on that, the fact that he says it's currently on a Form 3, and the fact that it's a ridiculously high-priced piece of sheet metal, (plus the seller is Nick Tilotta, who's pretty well-respected in the C3 world), IMHO I'd say "Yes, it is legal." But what do you mean by "the rest of the story"? It's a registered drop-in auto connector ...sort of a lightning link for a 1927A1.
As for being overpriced, aren't they all? I think the $550 I paid for my M11, and the $4k I paid for my TSMG are way overpriced, but with 922(o), but if you wanna play, you gotta pay.
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#8 Sgt

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Posted 26 November 2003 - 11:40 PM

Personally, I wouldn't want the auto feature without a way to easily switch it to semi. That brings up my question. Is it mechanically and legally feasible to fabricate a selector control with this auto connector?
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#9 PK.

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Posted 27 November 2003 - 12:04 AM

Yes it is. Installation of the registered firing pin makes the gun an open bolt design. With the addition of a 28 frame (or the mods to the 27 frame to include a pivot) and the proper notch in the bolt it will have the same capabilities as a normal TSMG.

There are a lot of details to this but I’m going to bed.

Happy “turkey day” to all.

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#10 Norm

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Posted 27 November 2003 - 11:22 AM

Yes, it is legal.

I own one. wink.gif I am still in the paperwork process, but the registered conversion device is at my class 3 dealer and is paid for. There were only ten of these registered. Mine is serial number BAGG-003.

They are designed as a "drop in" full auto only conversion, but with modifications to the device and the bolt in which it is attached, it can be made into a select-fire weapon. It does not require any modifications to the receiver.

The gun that contains this device can have a short barrel on it AS LONG AS THE DEVICE IS INTALLED! If it is removed and put into another gun or "parted" from the weapon, the short barrel must be removed. This is not neccessary if the gun is registered as an SBR. I have a letter from the ATF saying that this is ok to do. I am going to register my 27A1 as an SBR.

I look forward to clearing the paperwork for it so I can send my 27A1 to PK for some TLC. biggrin.gif

Norm
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